Fully Alive with Dr. Ronnie Phillips, Jr.

Fully Alive with Dr. Ronnie Phillips, Jr.

Do you feel burned out, wanting a new fresh anointing on your life?

In this episode, Dr. Ronnie Phillips, Jr. the lead pastor of Abba's House discusses how you can live fully alive. Hear him share his story and the struggles Ronnie had with his faith. Through his story, learn how God worked miracles in him to go deeper in the gifts of God. Listen to find out how you can receive a fresh anointing with the upcoming conference Fresh Oil, New Wine coming up March 3-6, 2019.

32 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

Charisma Connection

Guest: Dr. Ronnie Phillips Jr.

 

Do you feel burned out, wanting a new fresh anointing on your life?

In this episode, Dr. Ronnie Phillips Jr., the lead pastor of Abba's House in Chattanooga, Tennessee, discusses how you can live fully alive. Hear him share his story and the struggles Ronnie had with his faith. Through his story, learn how God worked miracles in him to go deeper in the gifts of God. Listen to find out how you can receive a fresh anointing with the upcoming conference Fresh Oil, New Wine coming up March 3-6, 2019.

Introduction

Jenny Rose Spaudo: Hello, and welcome to our podcast Charisma Connection. Today I have with me Dr. Ronnie Phillips, Jr. and he is the lead pastor of Abba’s house. For those of you who don't know me, I'm your host today Jenny Rosse Spaudo. I'm excited for this podcast because Dr. Ronnie Phillips Jr. has a very unique and powerful anointing in his position. As lead pastor of Abba’s House, He and his wife have ministered in very deep ways to people who are hurting and broken and their ministry has just done so much good. Today we have a very, very interesting topic of discussion and that is your new conference coming up called Fresh Oil, New Wine. So, before we jump into that though, could you just tell us a little bit about your background in particular and maybe how you became the pastor at Abba’s House.

 

Ronnie Phillips: To be honest, that was such a long road for me. I was called by the Lord to preach at eight years old. But my father, who was in ministry came to our church in 1979, in the midst of controversy. The pastor before him was accused of murdering his wife. My father walked into a church split in 1979. I was born a year later. And then 10 years later, the worship and student pastor that he inherited was found out to be a pedophile dating back 20 years. So, my father, who's written many warfare books and published with Charisma, really as a Baptist had no choice but to dive into spiritual warfare and the things of the Spirit, But, as a child, I was growing up during those developmental stages in the midst of a lot of church drama and hatefulness. I became very bitter at the church. I love my father but I really hated the church and church people. I don't have time to tell you my entire testimony, but I'll tell you a little bit of it. I got away from the Lord and got into drugs and alcohol in my teens and I buried one of my best friends at 19. It changed my life. I was in a corporate job in insurance, was married very young and, at age 23, I was traveling by Abba’s House when it was being built and I felt the Holy Spirit say to me, ‘there lies your destiny,’ that I've been running far too long and I was actually on my way to a bar that night with friends and the Holy Spirit just brought conviction to my life. That night, I hit the title bathroom floor there in my home and got things right with God. I got touched by the Holy Spirit and started serving God right where I was. I kept my corporate job and I started preaching in prisons and rehabs and helping the homeless and loving people. God opened up a door for me two years, three years into that just doing outreach and preaching and ministering to people to pastor a church in the inner city of Atlanta, with about 120 people and no staff. It was kind of a weekend church as we called it. I did that for a year. It matured me in ways that even seminary …. getting all the degrees … doing those things, it didn't mature me like pastoring that little church in the inner city with fed the homeless and welcomed the drug addict and all of those things. Shortly after that, my father had heart problems and had open-heart surgery and I came back to help my dad as an associate. Shortly after I came back my father would have a triple bypass. He had the widow maker and would be out of commission for six months. The church got to see me lead Abba’s House without him being there because we took his phone and we wouldn't let him be the pastor for six months. He lost weight and got his health right and he’s still here, thank God. He's my hero. So, the church got to see me lead at 29 years old without him, and that was important. Even though I had corporate experience in the past, you're out of town, in seminary, and since then graduated, it was important for them to see me lead outside of his shadow. God really moved. We saw miracles and people saved during that season. And at that point, the leadership of our church voted that I would be the successor to my father over a number of years. Every year that went by after that, I took on more responsibility and my father took on less. We made that official in 2017. The church voted to support our elders and our council that I would be the leader. I’m in year two as the lead service, I call myself. We're trying to make some changes, some positive changes to reach this next generation. We obviously celebrate our history and our great legacy of being Baptist, but also embracing the gifts of the Holy Spirit and embracing signs and wonders. We are thankful for our great heritage, but we've also kind of renewed our passion for reaching people. We feed the homeless every week. We love people, our church is growing. It is becoming a multicultural church at Kingdom church, which makes me very happy. Honestly, it is a dream come true. I thought I had sailed and lost favor with God and man in my early 20s. If you would have told me maybe at 22 years of age that I would be the lead pastor now and doing what God has called me to do and preaching and traveling the world, I would have told you that you are crazy. But for the grace of God and all things work together for the good for those called according to His purpose. So, that is the very quick version of how I got to be lead pastor. I should have just said grace because that’s the answer, by the grace of God.

 

Jenny Rose Spaudo: That's such a powerful testimony. I wish you could just share every detail because it's just so exciting to hear what God has done in your life. While your dad was still leader pastor of Abba’s House, he started the Fresh Oil, New Wine Conference, right? That was, what, 22 years ago? How has the conference changed and evolved since then? And what do you what do you kind of expecting this year?

 

Ronnie Phillips: It started as a conference for burned out Baptist preachers. We are still a Baptist church, but in the 1990s, the statistics were that 50 or 60 percent of Southern Baptist pastors had been touched or filled with the Holy Spirit, but had to keep it hidden. Maybe they had a private prayer language. They believed in the gifts of the Spirit, but because of the denomination’s view on the spiritual gifts, they had to kind of hide that belief. Many of them were suicidal or quitting the ministry. They still are. So, my father had this dream that he would have this conference called Fresh Oil, New Wine for burned out Baptist pastors to come and get away from the normal denominational routine. Here's some preachers maybe from other denominations and really go deeper in the things of the Spirit. Man, it’s been a powerful conference for 22 years. Charles Caron and Josh Jentezen Franklin, so many powerful voices. Perry Stone has been a number of times. Men and women of God came that Baptists had never heard of, but they got filled with the Spirit. But it did change. That was the draw for probably the first 12 years. The last 10 years, it's really transformed into more of a family; a family of pastors in our city and pastors and staffs travel around the world to come and just be in that atmosphere. It is turned into more of a kingdom conference where people that are burned out from all denominations. We have Assembly of God pastors come, we have Church of God pastors come.  We still have Baptist pastors that come and we have a number of non-denominational pastors that come in and really pastors that are in small rural areas. I just left Harrisonburg, Virginia, and preached for three days for one of our pastors in our network. These pastors, many of them are bi-vocational or if they are full-time maybe they have one part-time staff person. They need refreshing. So, they'll come to our conference and they get to hear mighty men and women of God. This year, we've got Jentezen Franklin, who's one of my mentors, coming. He’s one of my heroes. His humility is the greatest thing about him. He’s a great family man. He's humble. I spent time in his home, my wife and I for our anniversary, and he just pours into young pastors, and he's humble. He’s one of the humblest people I've ever met. Of course, my father is still one of the greatest expository preachers in the country. So, they're going to get to hear him and myself, and then also Bishop Dale Bronner, who I've admired for a decade. When I pastored that church in Atlanta, I only had about five messages when they called me. I know that sounds funny, they were good, but I only had about five. So, I would get up at five in the morning in and when I would drive to Atlanta from Chattanooga, I would just be praying God, let this message come out right. Let God move in a powerful way. When I would cross over the Georgia border, I would hear Bishop Browner on the radio from Atlanta, and it was amazing that Bishop Bronner would be preaching some Sundays on what I was preaching on. I would have one hand on the steering wheel and the other writing things that I heard. So, having him Abba’s House is just a dream come true. He's going to be there for a couple of days. I'm excited about this year. I think we’re have a powerful time.

 

Jenny Rose Spaudo: You’re describing that there's just so much more unity among denominations than we've seen in the past. I'm relatively young but back when I was really young, and my parents, my dad's a pastor, and they were just starting out, there was still a lot of division among denominations, and, well, I disagree with you and on this and on that. But do you think that there's hope that we could ever come back together again as a nation, as a as an American church? What does the Bible have to say about that? And why is unity so important in this day and age?

 

Ronnie Phillips: The Bible says how good and pleasant it is for brothers and sisters to live together in unity. It also says in Matthew 18 for where two or three are gathered in my name, there I will be in the midst of them. The word agreement is the Greek word symphonia. We get our word symphony from it. If Jesus Christ is the conductor, and we all are in the right position that God has placed us in and we're operating in our gifting under the authority of the conductors, then a beautiful sound is released into heaven. When we talk about unity, it's really about right position, being in alignment with God, seeking first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness and just believing that Jesus is who He says He is. He'll do what he said he would do and just walking together on and on with our brothers and sisters. I am blessed because of the legacy and my father to preach in multiple denominations. I'm preaching in a Pentecostal church, an IPHC church today, and I am a Southern Baptist. I’ve preached at Southern Baptist churches, IPHC, and I'm preaching in my First Presbyterian Church this year in Colorado. I've never been to Colorado, and I've never preached in a Presbyterian Church, but I’m excited. I just believe that the kingdom of God is bigger than our differences. Of course, we don't want to compromise on the basics of the faith, the virgin birth, the Trinity, the atoning blood of Jesus, those kinds of things. But we don't need to be arguing over semantics when we need to be modeling this unity so that the political world can see the church and go, man, I wish we could attain that kind of unity. We really need to be an example to our political leaders of how to walk together unity even when we disagree. The church is just divided as the political world, but it's changing because of the power of the Holy Spirit. We need to celebrate those changes and love one another and reach people for Jesus Christ. I believe there's a generation rising that is going to reach people and they're going to put aside all these petty differences and do Kingdom things. I'm a part of that, you're a part of that. I'm excited about it. I believe we're going to see a great move of God really in the next two years that that's going to bring heaven to earth, which is what Kingdom theology is all about. So, I'm excited about it.

 

For the rest of the interview with Ronnie Phillips Jr., please visit cpnshows.com.

 

Connect with Ronnie Phillips Jr.

·         At ronniephillips.org

·         Abbashouse.com

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

Episode Notes

Charisma Connection

Guest: Dr. Ronnie Phillips Jr.

 

Do you feel burned out, wanting a new fresh anointing on your life?

In this episode, Dr. Ronnie Phillips Jr., the lead pastor of Abba's House in Chattanooga, Tennessee, discusses how you can live fully alive. Hear him share his story and the struggles Ronnie had with his faith. Through his story, learn how God worked miracles in him to go deeper in the gifts of God. Listen to find out how you can receive a fresh anointing with the upcoming conference Fresh Oil, New Wine coming up March 3-6, 2019.

Introduction

Jenny Rose Spaudo: Hello, and welcome to our podcast Charisma Connection. Today I have with me Dr. Ronnie Phillips, Jr. and he is the lead pastor of Abba’s house. For those of you who don't know me, I'm your host today Jenny Rosse Spaudo. I'm excited for this podcast because Dr. Ronnie Phillips Jr. has a very unique and powerful anointing in his position. As lead pastor of Abba’s House, He and his wife have ministered in very deep ways to people who are hurting and broken and their ministry has just done so much good. Today we have a very, very interesting topic of discussion and that is your new conference coming up called Fresh Oil, New Wine. So, before we jump into that though, could you just tell us a little bit about your background in particular and maybe how you became the pastor at Abba’s House.

 

Ronnie Phillips: To be honest, that was such a long road for me. I was called by the Lord to preach at eight years old. But my father, who was in ministry came to our church in 1979, in the midst of controversy. The pastor before him was accused of murdering his wife. My father walked into a church split in 1979. I was born a year later. And then 10 years later, the worship and student pastor that he inherited was found out to be a pedophile dating back 20 years. So, my father, who's written many warfare books and published with Charisma, really as a Baptist had no choice but to dive into spiritual warfare and the things of the Spirit, But, as a child, I was growing up during those developmental stages in the midst of a lot of church drama and hatefulness. I became very bitter at the church. I love my father but I really hated the church and church people. I don't have time to tell you my entire testimony, but I'll tell you a little bit of it. I got away from the Lord and got into drugs and alcohol in my teens and I buried one of my best friends at 19. It changed my life. I was in a corporate job in insurance, was married very young and, at age 23, I was traveling by Abba’s House when it was being built and I felt the Holy Spirit say to me, ‘there lies your destiny,’ that I've been running far too long and I was actually on my way to a bar that night with friends and the Holy Spirit just brought conviction to my life. That night, I hit the title bathroom floor there in my home and got things right with God. I got touched by the Holy Spirit and started serving God right where I was. I kept my corporate job and I started preaching in prisons and rehabs and helping the homeless and loving people. God opened up a door for me two years, three years into that just doing outreach and preaching and ministering to people to pastor a church in the inner city of Atlanta, with about 120 people and no staff. It was kind of a weekend church as we called it. I did that for a year. It matured me in ways that even seminary …. getting all the degrees … doing those things, it didn't mature me like pastoring that little church in the inner city with fed the homeless and welcomed the drug addict and all of those things. Shortly after that, my father had heart problems and had open-heart surgery and I came back to help my dad as an associate. Shortly after I came back my father would have a triple bypass. He had the widow maker and would be out of commission for six months. The church got to see me lead Abba’s House without him being there because we took his phone and we wouldn't let him be the pastor for six months. He lost weight and got his health right and he’s still here, thank God. He's my hero. So, the church got to see me lead at 29 years old without him, and that was important. Even though I had corporate experience in the past, you're out of town, in seminary, and since then graduated, it was important for them to see me lead outside of his shadow. God really moved. We saw miracles and people saved during that season. And at that point, the leadership of our church voted that I would be the successor to my father over a number of years. Every year that went by after that, I took on more responsibility and my father took on less. We made that official in 2017. The church voted to support our elders and our council that I would be the leader. I’m in year two as the lead service, I call myself. We're trying to make some changes, some positive changes to reach this next generation. We obviously celebrate our history and our great legacy of being Baptist, but also embracing the gifts of the Holy Spirit and embracing signs and wonders. We are thankful for our great heritage, but we've also kind of renewed our passion for reaching people. We feed the homeless every week. We love people, our church is growing. It is becoming a multicultural church at Kingdom church, which makes me very happy. Honestly, it is a dream come true. I thought I had sailed and lost favor with God and man in my early 20s. If you would have told me maybe at 22 years of age that I would be the lead pastor now and doing what God has called me to do and preaching and traveling the world, I would have told you that you are crazy. But for the grace of God and all things work together for the good for those called according to His purpose. So, that is the very quick version of how I got to be lead pastor. I should have just said grace because that’s the answer, by the grace of God.

 

Jenny Rose Spaudo: That's such a powerful testimony. I wish you could just share every detail because it's just so exciting to hear what God has done in your life. While your dad was still leader pastor of Abba’s House, he started the Fresh Oil, New Wine Conference, right? That was, what, 22 years ago? How has the conference changed and evolved since then? And what do you what do you kind of expecting this year?

 

Ronnie Phillips: It started as a conference for burned out Baptist preachers. We are still a Baptist church, but in the 1990s, the statistics were that 50 or 60 percent of Southern Baptist pastors had been touched or filled with the Holy Spirit, but had to keep it hidden. Maybe they had a private prayer language. They believed in the gifts of the Spirit, but because of the denomination’s view on the spiritual gifts, they had to kind of hide that belief. Many of them were suicidal or quitting the ministry. They still are. So, my father had this dream that he would have this conference called Fresh Oil, New Wine for burned out Baptist pastors to come and get away from the normal denominational routine. Here's some preachers maybe from other denominations and really go deeper in the things of the Spirit. Man, it’s been a powerful conference for 22 years. Charles Caron and Josh Jentezen Franklin, so many powerful voices. Perry Stone has been a number of times. Men and women of God came that Baptists had never heard of, but they got filled with the Spirit. But it did change. That was the draw for probably the first 12 years. The last 10 years, it's really transformed into more of a family; a family of pastors in our city and pastors and staffs travel around the world to come and just be in that atmosphere. It is turned into more of a kingdom conference where people that are burned out from all denominations. We have Assembly of God pastors come, we have Church of God pastors come.  We still have Baptist pastors that come and we have a number of non-denominational pastors that come in and really pastors that are in small rural areas. I just left Harrisonburg, Virginia, and preached for three days for one of our pastors in our network. These pastors, many of them are bi-vocational or if they are full-time maybe they have one part-time staff person. They need refreshing. So, they'll come to our conference and they get to hear mighty men and women of God. This year, we've got Jentezen Franklin, who's one of my mentors, coming. He’s one of my heroes. His humility is the greatest thing about him. He’s a great family man. He's humble. I spent time in his home, my wife and I for our anniversary, and he just pours into young pastors, and he's humble. He’s one of the humblest people I've ever met. Of course, my father is still one of the greatest expository preachers in the country. So, they're going to get to hear him and myself, and then also Bishop Dale Bronner, who I've admired for a decade. When I pastored that church in Atlanta, I only had about five messages when they called me. I know that sounds funny, they were good, but I only had about five. So, I would get up at five in the morning in and when I would drive to Atlanta from Chattanooga, I would just be praying God, let this message come out right. Let God move in a powerful way. When I would cross over the Georgia border, I would hear Bishop Browner on the radio from Atlanta, and it was amazing that Bishop Bronner would be preaching some Sundays on what I was preaching on. I would have one hand on the steering wheel and the other writing things that I heard. So, having him Abba’s House is just a dream come true. He's going to be there for a couple of days. I'm excited about this year. I think we’re have a powerful time.

 

Jenny Rose Spaudo: You’re describing that there's just so much more unity among denominations than we've seen in the past. I'm relatively young but back when I was really young, and my parents, my dad's a pastor, and they were just starting out, there was still a lot of division among denominations, and, well, I disagree with you and on this and on that. But do you think that there's hope that we could ever come back together again as a nation, as a as an American church? What does the Bible have to say about that? And why is unity so important in this day and age?

 

Ronnie Phillips: The Bible says how good and pleasant it is for brothers and sisters to live together in unity. It also says in Matthew 18 for where two or three are gathered in my name, there I will be in the midst of them. The word agreement is the Greek word symphonia. We get our word symphony from it. If Jesus Christ is the conductor, and we all are in the right position that God has placed us in and we're operating in our gifting under the authority of the conductors, then a beautiful sound is released into heaven. When we talk about unity, it's really about right position, being in alignment with God, seeking first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness and just believing that Jesus is who He says He is. He'll do what he said he would do and just walking together on and on with our brothers and sisters. I am blessed because of the legacy and my father to preach in multiple denominations. I'm preaching in a Pentecostal church, an IPHC church today, and I am a Southern Baptist. I’ve preached at Southern Baptist churches, IPHC, and I'm preaching in my First Presbyterian Church this year in Colorado. I've never been to Colorado, and I've never preached in a Presbyterian Church, but I’m excited. I just believe that the kingdom of God is bigger than our differences. Of course, we don't want to compromise on the basics of the faith, the virgin birth, the Trinity, the atoning blood of Jesus, those kinds of things. But we don't need to be arguing over semantics when we need to be modeling this unity so that the political world can see the church and go, man, I wish we could attain that kind of unity. We really need to be an example to our political leaders of how to walk together unity even when we disagree. The church is just divided as the political world, but it's changing because of the power of the Holy Spirit. We need to celebrate those changes and love one another and reach people for Jesus Christ. I believe there's a generation rising that is going to reach people and they're going to put aside all these petty differences and do Kingdom things. I'm a part of that, you're a part of that. I'm excited about it. I believe we're going to see a great move of God really in the next two years that that's going to bring heaven to earth, which is what Kingdom theology is all about. So, I'm excited about it.

 

For the rest of the interview with Ronnie Phillips Jr., please visit cpnshows.com.

 

Connect with Ronnie Phillips Jr.

·         At ronniephillips.org

·         Abbashouse.com

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

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Fully Alive with Dr. Ronnie Phillips, Jr.