Unite Your City with Jason Law

Unite Your City with Jason Law

Listen to this episode to find out how the movement of Unite My City is making a powerful impact and what you can do to change your city.

The President of World Compassion in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Jason Law got together with like-minded believers who have asked the same questions he has: What can we do, and what would it look
like if we really worked?

20 Minutes • 19 days ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Jason Law

 

Over the past decade, Jason Law has watched closely as divisive attitudes—political, racial and even theological—have ripped America apart. A lack of love for one another, a lack of honor and respect for each other, he says, has had a "cancerous effect" on our nation. Law says it must be stopped.

The President of World Compassion in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Law got together with like-minded believers who have asked the same questions he has: What can we do, and what would it look like if we really worked?

Listen to Dr. Steve Greene’s interview with Law to find out about how the movement of Unite My City is making a powerful impact.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: If you take a look out of your window, even now, you might be seeing what a lot of us see; that our cities are in trouble. What's going on? You can't turn the news on. It's not family viewing anymore. I remember being a news guy that we used to talk about if it bleeds it leads, but there are so many murders and attacks and crimes that are our local newscast has become nothing but a police blotter of all the things that are going wrong. And yet, there's hope for us. There's a lot going on. As I look out my window, I want to know better ways to honor people and stop with the opinions already; to choose love over hate. How hard is that going to be? For encouragement over criticism, to find peace with one another? Can we just go outside and find peace with our neighbors; to stop the hatred, come together make a significant difference. Maybe I've got rose-colored glasses on, or maybe I've read a book by Jason Law called Unite My City. I'm so excited about having Jason Law on our podcast today. You know that I'm a peacemaker. I want that across the world, but I'll settle for it in my zip code. We can start there. I think Jason has written a book that will get us started down that path. So, without any further delay, I want to introduce you to Jason Law, who's written a great book called Unite My City. Jason, welcome to the Greenelines podcast. You're good man. You've done a good work. So, let's just dive right into the middle of this book. What is it that's resonating in your own hometown and Tulsa, Oklahoma? What's making Unite My City catch fire in your backyard?

 

Jason Law: I believe it's a message that's been on the heart of a lot of people across our city as we've kind of gone down this road the last almost nine years now. Just beginning to talk with people, pastors around the city, just asking the question; it’s really not a new question. But, what can we do? What would it look like if we really worked together? Is that just a good idea? Does it just sound good? Is that what we're supposed to say? But what if it really happened? What could happen? I began to find a lot of different people that had the same idea asking the same questions, kind of in a season a number of years ago. What God really showed me was if I'm putting this on the hearts of many, this is a movement. This isn't just about one person or one idea, it really is a move of God. I credit it to many people having a passion for this. And then as a ministry, World Compassion here in Tulsa, we don't do any work typically in our own city. We work in countries that are hostile to the gospel. But growing up here and being raised here, I saw … and I was a marketing major. One thing we learned in marketing, if there's a need, fill it. I thought maybe we could maybe fill that need in the city. As a non-local church, maybe we could be that neutral party that would help bring people together and shape this vision for our city. It has now grown into what's called Unite My City.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Unite My City is now growing. I want to detail that a little bit, but give us a little more specificity about what's going on in the city. Give me some examples of how you can see your city uniting.

 

Jason Law: One of my core beliefs in all of this is that before a city can really unite, the church has got to be united. I think the church has to come out as a strong front in a spirit of unity. We've been working on making connections with pastors … and people have done that in Tulsa over the years; this isn't anything different … but we've been very strategic with it. I've laid out a framework which I share in the book Unite My City that just provides a general framework that brings a little bit of structure to help sustain a movement. Pastor relationships have been a very key part of that. So, we've done a lot of fun activities with pastors. It's not always getting together and praying. We take them out duck hunting. We've done like an escape room day, just hang out times where they're building trust and relationship with one another. But we've done large city-wide days where we serve our city together. Last year, I think we had 35 churches, several mega churches here in Tulsa. You were around here for a while yourself, Dr. Greene. You know that the horsepower of ministry in the city. So, we've seen collaborative efforts start to take place at a greater level. Tulsa is also known for significant racial divide. We're home to arguably, and it's not a proud statement, but arguably the largest race riot in U.S. history, the 1921 Tulsa race riots, which is now I believe, being called the Tulsa Massacre, the race massacre. So, our city still has a geographical divide.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: It's unusual today and none of us want it. Certainly no one that you speak with every day in Tulsa is happy about it, but it's there and it's real.

 

Jason Law: We’ve done some racial healing breakfasts among pastors. There was a national news story with a shooting here in Tulsa with a police officer and Terrence Crutcher. We had already had a racial-healing panel planned. We were kind of in the in the works of planning that and a pastor friend of mine, Pastor Michael Todd from north Tulsa, he called me to say we’ve got to do something right now. So, we threw together this racial healing breakfast and had 72 pastors show up to this thing. We ended up hosting two of those and just begin to introduce leadership to one another and start a little bit more of a heartfelt conversation about what we need to do to try to bring healing in our city. We're still a long way away from where we need to be, but the initial sparks are there.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: I want to speak to the first miracle that that I've heard in this conversation and that's that you can get that many pastors to come together and be united. It’s big river crossing level of miracle. This is big, and in particular I think, and I don't mean a slam on Tulsa, but there's just so many large great works there that it's tough. Everyone really is protecting their own flock and afraid of what somebody else might be bringing.

 

Jason Law: One hundred percent. I feel like those walls are starting to go down, but it requires trust. They're still there. It's difficult, and the issues are real. It's like if we start interacting and this personally is my church and they go to your church, and how many people are going to take with them and how many dollars does that equal in our budget. All of those things are very real. There's doctrine that divides us, there's politics that divides us, there's race that divides us. All these things divide us. These fears can divide us. But yet that's not the command from God. We're called to a higher calling and that's to love one another.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That would be nice if we could just get to that level, especially if it starts with leadership. So, the obvious question then is if that's what's happening in the Tulsa area, what's going on in other regions around you that you're seeing and maybe report on how that's working?

 

Jason Law: That's where I got started. I learned from other cities and other people that have written on the subject. In my book Unite My City, there's a lot of those sources and resource pages back there that I direct people to as well. Again, what this proves is this is a move of God. This is happening in cities all over America already. City gospel movements is a very common terminology. There are movements like this in other countries around the world. We're actually starting to see the beginning one of these in the country of Myanmar and Yangon that we worked with on the World Compassion side of things. So, it's, it's happening and that's how it's a move of God. But every city is different. Every city has a different culture and atmosphere. The church even has a different character and that's in the politics and the demographics that are all different. So there's not a cookie-cutter approach to this from what I've learned.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: I'm a part of a ministry in Zimbabwe. Tommy Deuschel. His dad is Pastor Tom Deuschel of Celebration Ministries in Zimbabwe. Tommy started a stadium ministry there and they invited churches from all around the Zim area in the country. They announced it as a come join with us. But, no logos, no egos. Don't bring it. We're not going to announce any name of any speaker. We're not going to put any logos of any churches up on the platform. There were several thousand people saved in a stadium ministry because no one cared who got the glory or whose church they were going to join. I believe that what's in your heart, an international heartbeat.

 

·         Matthew 12:25: “Jesus knew their thoughts and said to them, “Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation. And every city or house divided against itself will not stand” (MEV).

 

Jason Law: We work in countries that are considered hostile or persecuted, restricted to the gospel message. That's been our 50-year legacy that my father, Dr. Terry Law, started. But one thing that I've learned is persecution doesn't stop the church. Jesus said, I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it. In Matthew 12, he teaches a kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and a city or a house divided cannot stand. So, working in all these different countries, I have a heart for the world obviously, but I can't help but to have more of a passion and more of a heart for my own country in the United States. So, this was something I felt that we could put our hand to and has grown into something that … it's a message and a movement that I believe can bring healing to our country and is a message that our country needs right now. They need the church to lead and example the way.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That's just good word. That leads us to your book Unite My City. From this heartbeat, from what you began to see and you were doing as a ministry, a book was birthed in you. Tell us about it.

 

Jason Law: Unite My City didn't start as a book. We used to call it the Red Letter Initiative off of the red letters and the prayers of Jesus in John 17. Then it grew into what is known now as Unite My City. I just watched kind of what was unfolding in our nation a number of years ago with Ferguson, Missouri, but then just all the political stuff, the political debates, the bantering back and forth. I've got opinions and I’m opinionated with the best of them, but I have a deep concern in our approach and our dialogue. There's a lack of honor. There's a lack of love one to another, all the way at the highest level in media and in politics. And it's developing a culture that I believe can be cancerous in our nation. God called us to disciple nations. So, I believe the church coming together in a spirit of unity can help start to redefine and rebuild a healthy culture. I believe that the city context is a way that we can do that.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Jason Law, visit cpnshows.com.

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Jason Law

 

Over the past decade, Jason Law has watched closely as divisive attitudes—political, racial and even theological—have ripped America apart. A lack of love for one another, a lack of honor and respect for each other, he says, has had a "cancerous effect" on our nation. Law says it must be stopped.

The President of World Compassion in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Law got together with like-minded believers who have asked the same questions he has: What can we do, and what would it look like if we really worked?

Listen to Dr. Steve Greene’s interview with Law to find out about how the movement of Unite My City is making a powerful impact.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: If you take a look out of your window, even now, you might be seeing what a lot of us see; that our cities are in trouble. What's going on? You can't turn the news on. It's not family viewing anymore. I remember being a news guy that we used to talk about if it bleeds it leads, but there are so many murders and attacks and crimes that are our local newscast has become nothing but a police blotter of all the things that are going wrong. And yet, there's hope for us. There's a lot going on. As I look out my window, I want to know better ways to honor people and stop with the opinions already; to choose love over hate. How hard is that going to be? For encouragement over criticism, to find peace with one another? Can we just go outside and find peace with our neighbors; to stop the hatred, come together make a significant difference. Maybe I've got rose-colored glasses on, or maybe I've read a book by Jason Law called Unite My City. I'm so excited about having Jason Law on our podcast today. You know that I'm a peacemaker. I want that across the world, but I'll settle for it in my zip code. We can start there. I think Jason has written a book that will get us started down that path. So, without any further delay, I want to introduce you to Jason Law, who's written a great book called Unite My City. Jason, welcome to the Greenelines podcast. You're good man. You've done a good work. So, let's just dive right into the middle of this book. What is it that's resonating in your own hometown and Tulsa, Oklahoma? What's making Unite My City catch fire in your backyard?

 

Jason Law: I believe it's a message that's been on the heart of a lot of people across our city as we've kind of gone down this road the last almost nine years now. Just beginning to talk with people, pastors around the city, just asking the question; it’s really not a new question. But, what can we do? What would it look like if we really worked together? Is that just a good idea? Does it just sound good? Is that what we're supposed to say? But what if it really happened? What could happen? I began to find a lot of different people that had the same idea asking the same questions, kind of in a season a number of years ago. What God really showed me was if I'm putting this on the hearts of many, this is a movement. This isn't just about one person or one idea, it really is a move of God. I credit it to many people having a passion for this. And then as a ministry, World Compassion here in Tulsa, we don't do any work typically in our own city. We work in countries that are hostile to the gospel. But growing up here and being raised here, I saw … and I was a marketing major. One thing we learned in marketing, if there's a need, fill it. I thought maybe we could maybe fill that need in the city. As a non-local church, maybe we could be that neutral party that would help bring people together and shape this vision for our city. It has now grown into what's called Unite My City.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Unite My City is now growing. I want to detail that a little bit, but give us a little more specificity about what's going on in the city. Give me some examples of how you can see your city uniting.

 

Jason Law: One of my core beliefs in all of this is that before a city can really unite, the church has got to be united. I think the church has to come out as a strong front in a spirit of unity. We've been working on making connections with pastors … and people have done that in Tulsa over the years; this isn't anything different … but we've been very strategic with it. I've laid out a framework which I share in the book Unite My City that just provides a general framework that brings a little bit of structure to help sustain a movement. Pastor relationships have been a very key part of that. So, we've done a lot of fun activities with pastors. It's not always getting together and praying. We take them out duck hunting. We've done like an escape room day, just hang out times where they're building trust and relationship with one another. But we've done large city-wide days where we serve our city together. Last year, I think we had 35 churches, several mega churches here in Tulsa. You were around here for a while yourself, Dr. Greene. You know that the horsepower of ministry in the city. So, we've seen collaborative efforts start to take place at a greater level. Tulsa is also known for significant racial divide. We're home to arguably, and it's not a proud statement, but arguably the largest race riot in U.S. history, the 1921 Tulsa race riots, which is now I believe, being called the Tulsa Massacre, the race massacre. So, our city still has a geographical divide.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: It's unusual today and none of us want it. Certainly no one that you speak with every day in Tulsa is happy about it, but it's there and it's real.

 

Jason Law: We’ve done some racial healing breakfasts among pastors. There was a national news story with a shooting here in Tulsa with a police officer and Terrence Crutcher. We had already had a racial-healing panel planned. We were kind of in the in the works of planning that and a pastor friend of mine, Pastor Michael Todd from north Tulsa, he called me to say we’ve got to do something right now. So, we threw together this racial healing breakfast and had 72 pastors show up to this thing. We ended up hosting two of those and just begin to introduce leadership to one another and start a little bit more of a heartfelt conversation about what we need to do to try to bring healing in our city. We're still a long way away from where we need to be, but the initial sparks are there.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: I want to speak to the first miracle that that I've heard in this conversation and that's that you can get that many pastors to come together and be united. It’s big river crossing level of miracle. This is big, and in particular I think, and I don't mean a slam on Tulsa, but there's just so many large great works there that it's tough. Everyone really is protecting their own flock and afraid of what somebody else might be bringing.

 

Jason Law: One hundred percent. I feel like those walls are starting to go down, but it requires trust. They're still there. It's difficult, and the issues are real. It's like if we start interacting and this personally is my church and they go to your church, and how many people are going to take with them and how many dollars does that equal in our budget. All of those things are very real. There's doctrine that divides us, there's politics that divides us, there's race that divides us. All these things divide us. These fears can divide us. But yet that's not the command from God. We're called to a higher calling and that's to love one another.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That would be nice if we could just get to that level, especially if it starts with leadership. So, the obvious question then is if that's what's happening in the Tulsa area, what's going on in other regions around you that you're seeing and maybe report on how that's working?

 

Jason Law: That's where I got started. I learned from other cities and other people that have written on the subject. In my book Unite My City, there's a lot of those sources and resource pages back there that I direct people to as well. Again, what this proves is this is a move of God. This is happening in cities all over America already. City gospel movements is a very common terminology. There are movements like this in other countries around the world. We're actually starting to see the beginning one of these in the country of Myanmar and Yangon that we worked with on the World Compassion side of things. So, it's, it's happening and that's how it's a move of God. But every city is different. Every city has a different culture and atmosphere. The church even has a different character and that's in the politics and the demographics that are all different. So there's not a cookie-cutter approach to this from what I've learned.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: I'm a part of a ministry in Zimbabwe. Tommy Deuschel. His dad is Pastor Tom Deuschel of Celebration Ministries in Zimbabwe. Tommy started a stadium ministry there and they invited churches from all around the Zim area in the country. They announced it as a come join with us. But, no logos, no egos. Don't bring it. We're not going to announce any name of any speaker. We're not going to put any logos of any churches up on the platform. There were several thousand people saved in a stadium ministry because no one cared who got the glory or whose church they were going to join. I believe that what's in your heart, an international heartbeat.

 

·         Matthew 12:25: “Jesus knew their thoughts and said to them, “Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation. And every city or house divided against itself will not stand” (MEV).

 

Jason Law: We work in countries that are considered hostile or persecuted, restricted to the gospel message. That's been our 50-year legacy that my father, Dr. Terry Law, started. But one thing that I've learned is persecution doesn't stop the church. Jesus said, I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it. In Matthew 12, he teaches a kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and a city or a house divided cannot stand. So, working in all these different countries, I have a heart for the world obviously, but I can't help but to have more of a passion and more of a heart for my own country in the United States. So, this was something I felt that we could put our hand to and has grown into something that … it's a message and a movement that I believe can bring healing to our country and is a message that our country needs right now. They need the church to lead and example the way.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That's just good word. That leads us to your book Unite My City. From this heartbeat, from what you began to see and you were doing as a ministry, a book was birthed in you. Tell us about it.

 

Jason Law: Unite My City didn't start as a book. We used to call it the Red Letter Initiative off of the red letters and the prayers of Jesus in John 17. Then it grew into what is known now as Unite My City. I just watched kind of what was unfolding in our nation a number of years ago with Ferguson, Missouri, but then just all the political stuff, the political debates, the bantering back and forth. I've got opinions and I’m opinionated with the best of them, but I have a deep concern in our approach and our dialogue. There's a lack of honor. There's a lack of love one to another, all the way at the highest level in media and in politics. And it's developing a culture that I believe can be cancerous in our nation. God called us to disciple nations. So, I believe the church coming together in a spirit of unity can help start to redefine and rebuild a healthy culture. I believe that the city context is a way that we can do that.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Jason Law, visit cpnshows.com.

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

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Unite Your City with Jason Law