The Need is the Call with Bill Wilson (Season 5, Ep. 21)

The Need is the Call with Bill Wilson (Season 5, Ep. 21)

Is there a need you see to be met? What would happen if it was as simple as stopping your car to help an abandoned child on the side of the road?

Bill Wilson, the founder of Metro World Hope, knows firsthand what it means when someone is moved by God to help a child. One day he was abandoned by his mother on the side of the street corner at the age 12. Three days later a Christian man stopped to help. This one act changed his life and lead to a worldwide ministry who brings hope to children in the toughest areas of the world so they can see beyond their circumstances.

Listen as Bill tells his story to hear how you can put into motion change in the lives of children.

37 Minutes • 5 months ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Pastor Bill Wilson

 

Abandoned on a street corner by his mother at the age of 12, young Bill Wilson sat and waited for her on that corner; he waited 3 days, but she never came back for him.  A Christian man who was on his way to see his son in the hospital stopped and asked him if he was ok.  Anybody could have stopped, but thankfully it was a Christian man who did. 

Pastor Bill established Metro World Child, formerly Metro Ministries, in 1980 in Bushwick, Brooklyn, in what was one of New York’s toughest neighborhoods at the time.  It was most commonly known for its history of gang violence, crime, drugs, and poverty.  In the earlier years of his work, Pastor Bill was beaten, stabbed and even shot.  He, however, persevered and refused to leave the neighborhood; believing that the situation wasn’t hopeless, that the children and their families just didn’t have any hope.  He persisted in doing Sunday School programs and reaching children with the hope of Jesus, eventually expanding into all 5 boroughs of New York City and many other places around the world as well.

For the rest of the Greenelines interview with Pastor Bill Wilson, visit charismapodcastnetwork.com/show/greenelines.

See this interview on Facebook at facebook.com/charismamagazine/videos

Childhood Tragedy

Pastor Bill Wilson: In a life such as I’ve lived, it’s probably been looked at as a fairly difficult, painful life just because of what I’ve been through.  When you’ve been through some tough stuff, it’s easy for people to feel like I’ve got a bit of a martyr complex, looking for a little sympathy. Of you can, as Paul said, take everything that has happened and use it for the furtherance of the gospel.

In 1960, my mother was an alcoholic. We were walking down the street in St. Petersburg, Florida, and she just looked at me and said, I can’t do this anymore. You wait here. She walked away from me and I stood there for three days. Many people walked by, drove by. Anybody could have picked me up. That was 1960, a different time in American history. But, the only person who stopped was a very ordinary Christian. His own son was in the hospital dying of leukemia. He was on his way home, pulled over and got out of his car and walked over to where I was sitting. He put his hand on my shoulder and just asked, “are you okay?” That’s it. Last week, we had 221,000 in Sunday school. The whole reason why Metro has become the largest Sunday school in the world is because that one Christian man stopped.

Dr. Steve Greene: Did he take you home, did he pray for you?

Bill Wilson: I used to stutter really bad when I was little, and I tried to tell him that my mother was gone. I was just hungry. Immediately, he gets his wife and she brings me some food and water. He gets on the phone and five hours later after meeting me on this street corner, he’s loading me in a church van and sends me to a Sunday school camp just north of Lakeland and that’s where I heard the gospel for the first time and it clicked. I was 12 years old and I had never been to church. I had no point of reference.  You can call it a defining moment. I’ve learned after 50 years in the ministry that there comes a time whether you’re watching for it or not, these moments show up. Whether you’re quick enough to understand it or if it bypasses you, you may never got that shot again. He saw something in me that my own mother didn’t see. He said I knew something was wrong and that I had to stop. In his own terms, he said that the Lord just put it upon him. …

I asked him why he sent me to camp. He had to borrow the $17.50 it took to send me to the camp. He said if I thought I could get you into the presence of God one time, something would happen. I guess it did.

Comments on Pastor Wilson from Facebook

·         “I love this story! Bill Wilson is such an inspiration!”

·         “Powerful testimony.”

·         “Wow! Jesus!”

 

The Call on Pastor Wilson’s Life

Dr. Steve Greene: Between the age of 12 and when you were called into ministry, what happened?

Pastor Bill Wilson: I’ve never been called, just so we understand that. The need is the call. If you are sharp enough, big doors open on small hinges. The little things in life that I think God puts in front of most of us almost every day … if you’re a student, to understand it, to pick up on it, to respond to it, that puts things in motion. It’s what you put into motion. And that’s what the man did when he picked me up off the street. He didn’t know it; I didn’t know it. He put something in motion. I graduated from high school and I worked for the Ford Motor Company, raced cars professionally, worked at a Ford dealership in St. Petersburg. I lived at the church because my mother never came back. They cleaned out a maintenance closet at the church. I lived in the church for almost three years.

A little old lady I knew at church one Sunday said to me, “Bill, you need to go to Bible school.” And that was it. I sold my race car, went to Southeastern Bible College when it was a Bible college. I did my four years, and that was during the Vietnam War. The first summer back at my home church, the pastor asked me if I would pick up kids for Sunday school. It’s that simple, I said yes. That led to one bus, which in turn led to five buses, which in turn led to 12 buses. Then, Tommy Barnett came to the church and held a revival when he was an evangelist. I helped him build the props for his illustrated sermons. We got to be pretty good buddies. He asked me to come up to Iowa where he was to build his bus ministry and Sunday school. I said, Ok. That became at that time the fastest-growing church in the United States during that time in the 1970s.

It’s those little things when an opportunity comes up. You have an option. You either do something with it or not. I think the Bible is pretty clear on what our mandate is as Christians. But I think we’ve propitiated a theology where there has to be some sort of extra canonical revelation to move some people into action. I don’t see that. I was around the old Pentecostal missionaries, names that most people would be unfamiliar with. … It was the perfect setup for me … guys like Charles Greenway, Morris Plotz, Mark Fontaine.

 

Pastor Wilson’s Books

·         In the Crosshairs

·         Whose Child is This?

 

Wilson’s Ministry

Pastor Bill Wilson: When Pastor Barnett went to Phoenix in 1980, I went to Brooklyn. I got tired of hearing about the ghettos and nobody seemed to be able to figure it out. It was always this enigma of the government said these kids are hopeless; the cops said these kids were hopeless; the churches were leaving, they said they were hopeless. I was in a meeting in Brooklyn and I heard that hopeless term one more time and I stood up and slammed my hand on the table. I said they are not hopeless, they just don’t have any hope. There’s a big difference. Jesus brings the hope. Either you believe that, or you don’t. If you don’t, then you can go sell cars. But, if you believe this, let’s get to it. So, I went there to Brooklyn in 1980 and we started the Sunday school there in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn. On the first weekend, we had 1,010 kids. We taught a simple salvation message right out of the gate …  As it’s evolved, it has become the training ground there in New York. We have a building there we all live in. The training is done there. People from all over the world are on staff there. This, in turn, has evolved into a worldwide organization.

 

Pastor Bill Wilson: “I speaker louder than the street.”

 

Metro Hope

Pastor Bill Wilson: It keeps kicking back to the need. You see children basically that were just like me. That’s why I still drive the Sunday school bus on the weekend in Brooklyn. That’s why this thing is real on so many different levels. This isn’t something that just comes out of some intellectual mental ascent. When you’ve lived it. When you’ve lived on the street … When I saw things as a child … you see things that are around you that don’t ever leave you. They are still pretty clear. And I realize what these kids go through. When you can make $100 cash standing on the street corner in Brooklyn, why would you want to work at McDonald’s? The whole system in the ghetto, the whole mindset of poverty … unless you’ve lived it and been around it, folks usually don’t understand what that does to a child. The die becomes cast. Until there is a voice that speaks louder than the street … I speak louder than the street. That’s why we’re there. That’s what it takes.

How You Can Get Involved with Metro World Child

·         Give

·         Sponsor a child

·         Internship

·         Visit Metro

 

Connect with Metro World Child

·         Metroworldchild.org

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

·         On Instagram

·         On YouTube

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Pastor Bill Wilson

 

Abandoned on a street corner by his mother at the age of 12, young Bill Wilson sat and waited for her on that corner; he waited 3 days, but she never came back for him.  A Christian man who was on his way to see his son in the hospital stopped and asked him if he was ok.  Anybody could have stopped, but thankfully it was a Christian man who did. 

Pastor Bill established Metro World Child, formerly Metro Ministries, in 1980 in Bushwick, Brooklyn, in what was one of New York’s toughest neighborhoods at the time.  It was most commonly known for its history of gang violence, crime, drugs, and poverty.  In the earlier years of his work, Pastor Bill was beaten, stabbed and even shot.  He, however, persevered and refused to leave the neighborhood; believing that the situation wasn’t hopeless, that the children and their families just didn’t have any hope.  He persisted in doing Sunday School programs and reaching children with the hope of Jesus, eventually expanding into all 5 boroughs of New York City and many other places around the world as well.

For the rest of the Greenelines interview with Pastor Bill Wilson, visit charismapodcastnetwork.com/show/greenelines.

See this interview on Facebook at facebook.com/charismamagazine/videos

Childhood Tragedy

Pastor Bill Wilson: In a life such as I’ve lived, it’s probably been looked at as a fairly difficult, painful life just because of what I’ve been through.  When you’ve been through some tough stuff, it’s easy for people to feel like I’ve got a bit of a martyr complex, looking for a little sympathy. Of you can, as Paul said, take everything that has happened and use it for the furtherance of the gospel.

In 1960, my mother was an alcoholic. We were walking down the street in St. Petersburg, Florida, and she just looked at me and said, I can’t do this anymore. You wait here. She walked away from me and I stood there for three days. Many people walked by, drove by. Anybody could have picked me up. That was 1960, a different time in American history. But, the only person who stopped was a very ordinary Christian. His own son was in the hospital dying of leukemia. He was on his way home, pulled over and got out of his car and walked over to where I was sitting. He put his hand on my shoulder and just asked, “are you okay?” That’s it. Last week, we had 221,000 in Sunday school. The whole reason why Metro has become the largest Sunday school in the world is because that one Christian man stopped.

Dr. Steve Greene: Did he take you home, did he pray for you?

Bill Wilson: I used to stutter really bad when I was little, and I tried to tell him that my mother was gone. I was just hungry. Immediately, he gets his wife and she brings me some food and water. He gets on the phone and five hours later after meeting me on this street corner, he’s loading me in a church van and sends me to a Sunday school camp just north of Lakeland and that’s where I heard the gospel for the first time and it clicked. I was 12 years old and I had never been to church. I had no point of reference.  You can call it a defining moment. I’ve learned after 50 years in the ministry that there comes a time whether you’re watching for it or not, these moments show up. Whether you’re quick enough to understand it or if it bypasses you, you may never got that shot again. He saw something in me that my own mother didn’t see. He said I knew something was wrong and that I had to stop. In his own terms, he said that the Lord just put it upon him. …

I asked him why he sent me to camp. He had to borrow the $17.50 it took to send me to the camp. He said if I thought I could get you into the presence of God one time, something would happen. I guess it did.

Comments on Pastor Wilson from Facebook

·         “I love this story! Bill Wilson is such an inspiration!”

·         “Powerful testimony.”

·         “Wow! Jesus!”

 

The Call on Pastor Wilson’s Life

Dr. Steve Greene: Between the age of 12 and when you were called into ministry, what happened?

Pastor Bill Wilson: I’ve never been called, just so we understand that. The need is the call. If you are sharp enough, big doors open on small hinges. The little things in life that I think God puts in front of most of us almost every day … if you’re a student, to understand it, to pick up on it, to respond to it, that puts things in motion. It’s what you put into motion. And that’s what the man did when he picked me up off the street. He didn’t know it; I didn’t know it. He put something in motion. I graduated from high school and I worked for the Ford Motor Company, raced cars professionally, worked at a Ford dealership in St. Petersburg. I lived at the church because my mother never came back. They cleaned out a maintenance closet at the church. I lived in the church for almost three years.

A little old lady I knew at church one Sunday said to me, “Bill, you need to go to Bible school.” And that was it. I sold my race car, went to Southeastern Bible College when it was a Bible college. I did my four years, and that was during the Vietnam War. The first summer back at my home church, the pastor asked me if I would pick up kids for Sunday school. It’s that simple, I said yes. That led to one bus, which in turn led to five buses, which in turn led to 12 buses. Then, Tommy Barnett came to the church and held a revival when he was an evangelist. I helped him build the props for his illustrated sermons. We got to be pretty good buddies. He asked me to come up to Iowa where he was to build his bus ministry and Sunday school. I said, Ok. That became at that time the fastest-growing church in the United States during that time in the 1970s.

It’s those little things when an opportunity comes up. You have an option. You either do something with it or not. I think the Bible is pretty clear on what our mandate is as Christians. But I think we’ve propitiated a theology where there has to be some sort of extra canonical revelation to move some people into action. I don’t see that. I was around the old Pentecostal missionaries, names that most people would be unfamiliar with. … It was the perfect setup for me … guys like Charles Greenway, Morris Plotz, Mark Fontaine.

 

Pastor Wilson’s Books

·         In the Crosshairs

·         Whose Child is This?

 

Wilson’s Ministry

Pastor Bill Wilson: When Pastor Barnett went to Phoenix in 1980, I went to Brooklyn. I got tired of hearing about the ghettos and nobody seemed to be able to figure it out. It was always this enigma of the government said these kids are hopeless; the cops said these kids were hopeless; the churches were leaving, they said they were hopeless. I was in a meeting in Brooklyn and I heard that hopeless term one more time and I stood up and slammed my hand on the table. I said they are not hopeless, they just don’t have any hope. There’s a big difference. Jesus brings the hope. Either you believe that, or you don’t. If you don’t, then you can go sell cars. But, if you believe this, let’s get to it. So, I went there to Brooklyn in 1980 and we started the Sunday school there in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn. On the first weekend, we had 1,010 kids. We taught a simple salvation message right out of the gate …  As it’s evolved, it has become the training ground there in New York. We have a building there we all live in. The training is done there. People from all over the world are on staff there. This, in turn, has evolved into a worldwide organization.

 

Pastor Bill Wilson: “I speaker louder than the street.”

 

Metro Hope

Pastor Bill Wilson: It keeps kicking back to the need. You see children basically that were just like me. That’s why I still drive the Sunday school bus on the weekend in Brooklyn. That’s why this thing is real on so many different levels. This isn’t something that just comes out of some intellectual mental ascent. When you’ve lived it. When you’ve lived on the street … When I saw things as a child … you see things that are around you that don’t ever leave you. They are still pretty clear. And I realize what these kids go through. When you can make $100 cash standing on the street corner in Brooklyn, why would you want to work at McDonald’s? The whole system in the ghetto, the whole mindset of poverty … unless you’ve lived it and been around it, folks usually don’t understand what that does to a child. The die becomes cast. Until there is a voice that speaks louder than the street … I speak louder than the street. That’s why we’re there. That’s what it takes.

How You Can Get Involved with Metro World Child

·         Give

·         Sponsor a child

·         Internship

·         Visit Metro

 

Connect with Metro World Child

·         Metroworldchild.org

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

·         On Instagram

·         On YouTube

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

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The Need is the Call with Bill Wilson (Season 5, Ep. 21)