Greenelines Friday Story: Lady With a Bag

Greenelines Friday Story: Lady With a Bag

A lady waits daily at an old oak tree. Golfers playing nearby only focused on the green while she watched cars passing by. Until one day someone asked: Who is she? Listen as our host Dr. Steve Greene tells the story of how a lady with a bag became a merchant of hope.

9 Minutes • 2 months ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

A lady waits daily at an old oak tree. Golfers playing nearby only focused on the green while she watched cars passing by. Until one day someone asked: Who is she?

Listen as our host Dr. Steve Greene tells the story of how a lady with a bag became a merchant of hope.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: This is the Greenelines podcast. I'm Steve green on the Charisma Podcast Network. I'd like to tell you about a series that is available to you now through Charisma. Many of you have seen bits and pieces of maybe one of these books: The Deborah Anointing, the Esther Anointing, the Anna Anointing, and the Ruth anointing, plus a free bonus all in the Solid Rock Series. You're going to get all four anointing books by Michelle McClain Walters, plus a Charisma subscription and two Life in the Spirit Devotions for only $36. I want to say that part of it again, you're going to get all four of those anointing books by Michelle McClain Walters, plus you'll receive a Charisma subscription, a subscription to Charisma magazine, and then you'll get to Life in the Spirit Devotions for only $36. You can find this at charismamag.com/anoint or can just look right here in this podcast in the show notes, and you'll see the link to charismamag.com/anoint. I know you'll love these books. And I know you'll love the free bonuses and a subscription to Charisma magazine. Now let's get to the show.

Dr. Steve Greene: This is the Friday edition of the Greenelines podcast. Every Friday we're going to be doing a different kind of show. You hear interviews all week, and I feel like on Friday, I want to slow it down a little bit and just tell a story. Most of my career has been about storytelling in many different ways either on television and writing or, in fact, standing in front of a classroom telling stories about business and success and failure of ideas and projects. So, I feel like there is always a time and a place for a story. So, our time and place together will be on this podcast on Fridays. I hope you enjoy it. I hope you look forward to it. I'm going to tell relevant stories that you feel will have a good takeaway, that a good story has a good message. So, I'll let you be the judge of that. I hope you would rate and share the Greenelines podcast. When I mean share, I'm just talking about recommend it to, people talk about it, and then tell me if you feel like I can improve it or if you'd like to hear less of me. That would be OK to call me and say knock it off and can you just do interviews? So, this is the Friday Greenelines story.

I first noticed the lady with a bag in the late 1970s. I was teaching marketing, a professor at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. You might remember We Are Marshall was a great movie within the last five or six years, maybe 10. That was the university where they suffered a horrible plane crash and lost the football team. It was a great story. I'd met so many people in Huntington and I remember Ernie Salvatore who was the sports writer and was really featured in the movie. But the main reason I remember Huntington is because my son was born there and it makes that place also very special in my heart. While I was in Huntington, the golf bug had bitten me pretty hard and began to nibble away at me. So, I joined with another professor in my department and I learned to play golf. Nearly 40 years later, I can still remember that golf course. I remember the hot dog shack, and the wide-open fairways, and I remember the lady with a bag.

There was a giant oak tree, aging gracefully about 30 yards behind the green. I know that this is because that was under that tree so many times. I had to have 30-yard shot back to the green so many times in my life. But on the other side of the tree was a lady with a bag. She stood there, in the shade, day after day. The lady with a bag stood on the other side of the oak tree, oblivious to the golfers. Her eyes were fixed on cars as they sped by and in the two years that I saw her, I never made eye contact whether or ever heard her voice.

I probably should pause this little bit to explain it. Most golfers are easily distracted by such things as a lady with a bag. My wife, as we play golf in these years that we have left together, frequently asks me to look at a blue heron in the water or a gaggle of geese flitting around the golf green or some cloud formation in the sky. It's my preference to remain blissfully unaware of the natural surroundings of golf. Trees, ponds and goose droppings are enemies of golf balls. So, it's no wonder that very few golfers noticed the lady with a bag. She had flowing, wavy brown hair that fell way below her shoulders. She always wore a dress that looked home sewn. I remember that she wore pearls. She had some adornment in her hair, some flowers, something always in her hair, and she had a scarf of some sort in her left hand. Her handbag was held in the band of a right elbow, and I never saw our without a bag in her arm.

It was a few months before I began to ask about her story. I didn't give her much thought. I just thought she was waiting for someone; that that was where people picked her up. That's where she got a ride. I began to play golf at various times of the day on weekends and late evenings. I noticed that every time I play golf, there she was standing in the shade under the giant oak tree. I finally asked the old golf pro, who's best skill in my opinion was hot dog serving, about this lady with a bag. He knew of her story because he had called the police about her many years prior to my questions. It seems that she was engaged to a fellow who went off to World War II. He had proposed to the lady right before he left to go to war under the giant oak tree, and he said he would meet her again, under the tree upon his return.

He didn't return. The old pro didn't know what became of the guy. He only knew the lady had been coming back to the tree every day for about 20 years. She did no harm to yourself or to others. She just came to that tree every day to wait for her fiance. Many of you would think that she was delusional. I don't think she was. I think she was full of hope. The lady with a bag taught me about hope.

One of man's greatest desires is to see a hope fulfilled. But one man's delusion is another man's hope. I think she had more hope than anyone I've ever met in my life. I don't think that for a minute she thought there was something wrong, or that her boyfriend wouldn't come back to get her. She just continued to hope. A lot of people will look at that and say, that's nuts. That's delusional. You’ve got a problem. She looks back at you and say you're the one with a problem because you don't believe; you don't have hope. Leaders must always inspire hope. Sometimes I prefer hope over facts because hope springs eternal. In my life, the lady with a bag will always be my reminder, to lead others as a merchant of hope. I hope you enjoyed this podcast show.

Would you do us a favor and rate it and give us a little review on what you thought of it? It would help us so much. Not because my ego needs five stars, but because iTunes really pays attention to whether or not our audience is connecting with the shows. Not just because you listened, but because you gave it lots of stars, and that you wrote some nice words about it. If you do that, what it does it helps us to get out there into the highways and byways and find more people to deliver our podcasts. We just want to reach more people. Would you help us do that? Help your friends here at Charisma media and rate and review this podcast. Thank you very much.

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

A lady waits daily at an old oak tree. Golfers playing nearby only focused on the green while she watched cars passing by. Until one day someone asked: Who is she?

Listen as our host Dr. Steve Greene tells the story of how a lady with a bag became a merchant of hope.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: This is the Greenelines podcast. I'm Steve green on the Charisma Podcast Network. I'd like to tell you about a series that is available to you now through Charisma. Many of you have seen bits and pieces of maybe one of these books: The Deborah Anointing, the Esther Anointing, the Anna Anointing, and the Ruth anointing, plus a free bonus all in the Solid Rock Series. You're going to get all four anointing books by Michelle McClain Walters, plus a Charisma subscription and two Life in the Spirit Devotions for only $36. I want to say that part of it again, you're going to get all four of those anointing books by Michelle McClain Walters, plus you'll receive a Charisma subscription, a subscription to Charisma magazine, and then you'll get to Life in the Spirit Devotions for only $36. You can find this at charismamag.com/anoint or can just look right here in this podcast in the show notes, and you'll see the link to charismamag.com/anoint. I know you'll love these books. And I know you'll love the free bonuses and a subscription to Charisma magazine. Now let's get to the show.

Dr. Steve Greene: This is the Friday edition of the Greenelines podcast. Every Friday we're going to be doing a different kind of show. You hear interviews all week, and I feel like on Friday, I want to slow it down a little bit and just tell a story. Most of my career has been about storytelling in many different ways either on television and writing or, in fact, standing in front of a classroom telling stories about business and success and failure of ideas and projects. So, I feel like there is always a time and a place for a story. So, our time and place together will be on this podcast on Fridays. I hope you enjoy it. I hope you look forward to it. I'm going to tell relevant stories that you feel will have a good takeaway, that a good story has a good message. So, I'll let you be the judge of that. I hope you would rate and share the Greenelines podcast. When I mean share, I'm just talking about recommend it to, people talk about it, and then tell me if you feel like I can improve it or if you'd like to hear less of me. That would be OK to call me and say knock it off and can you just do interviews? So, this is the Friday Greenelines story.

I first noticed the lady with a bag in the late 1970s. I was teaching marketing, a professor at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. You might remember We Are Marshall was a great movie within the last five or six years, maybe 10. That was the university where they suffered a horrible plane crash and lost the football team. It was a great story. I'd met so many people in Huntington and I remember Ernie Salvatore who was the sports writer and was really featured in the movie. But the main reason I remember Huntington is because my son was born there and it makes that place also very special in my heart. While I was in Huntington, the golf bug had bitten me pretty hard and began to nibble away at me. So, I joined with another professor in my department and I learned to play golf. Nearly 40 years later, I can still remember that golf course. I remember the hot dog shack, and the wide-open fairways, and I remember the lady with a bag.

There was a giant oak tree, aging gracefully about 30 yards behind the green. I know that this is because that was under that tree so many times. I had to have 30-yard shot back to the green so many times in my life. But on the other side of the tree was a lady with a bag. She stood there, in the shade, day after day. The lady with a bag stood on the other side of the oak tree, oblivious to the golfers. Her eyes were fixed on cars as they sped by and in the two years that I saw her, I never made eye contact whether or ever heard her voice.

I probably should pause this little bit to explain it. Most golfers are easily distracted by such things as a lady with a bag. My wife, as we play golf in these years that we have left together, frequently asks me to look at a blue heron in the water or a gaggle of geese flitting around the golf green or some cloud formation in the sky. It's my preference to remain blissfully unaware of the natural surroundings of golf. Trees, ponds and goose droppings are enemies of golf balls. So, it's no wonder that very few golfers noticed the lady with a bag. She had flowing, wavy brown hair that fell way below her shoulders. She always wore a dress that looked home sewn. I remember that she wore pearls. She had some adornment in her hair, some flowers, something always in her hair, and she had a scarf of some sort in her left hand. Her handbag was held in the band of a right elbow, and I never saw our without a bag in her arm.

It was a few months before I began to ask about her story. I didn't give her much thought. I just thought she was waiting for someone; that that was where people picked her up. That's where she got a ride. I began to play golf at various times of the day on weekends and late evenings. I noticed that every time I play golf, there she was standing in the shade under the giant oak tree. I finally asked the old golf pro, who's best skill in my opinion was hot dog serving, about this lady with a bag. He knew of her story because he had called the police about her many years prior to my questions. It seems that she was engaged to a fellow who went off to World War II. He had proposed to the lady right before he left to go to war under the giant oak tree, and he said he would meet her again, under the tree upon his return.

He didn't return. The old pro didn't know what became of the guy. He only knew the lady had been coming back to the tree every day for about 20 years. She did no harm to yourself or to others. She just came to that tree every day to wait for her fiance. Many of you would think that she was delusional. I don't think she was. I think she was full of hope. The lady with a bag taught me about hope.

One of man's greatest desires is to see a hope fulfilled. But one man's delusion is another man's hope. I think she had more hope than anyone I've ever met in my life. I don't think that for a minute she thought there was something wrong, or that her boyfriend wouldn't come back to get her. She just continued to hope. A lot of people will look at that and say, that's nuts. That's delusional. You’ve got a problem. She looks back at you and say you're the one with a problem because you don't believe; you don't have hope. Leaders must always inspire hope. Sometimes I prefer hope over facts because hope springs eternal. In my life, the lady with a bag will always be my reminder, to lead others as a merchant of hope. I hope you enjoyed this podcast show.

Would you do us a favor and rate it and give us a little review on what you thought of it? It would help us so much. Not because my ego needs five stars, but because iTunes really pays attention to whether or not our audience is connecting with the shows. Not just because you listened, but because you gave it lots of stars, and that you wrote some nice words about it. If you do that, what it does it helps us to get out there into the highways and byways and find more people to deliver our podcasts. We just want to reach more people. Would you help us do that? Help your friends here at Charisma media and rate and review this podcast. Thank you very much.

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

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Greenelines Friday Story: Lady With a Bag