Add a Double Portion of Honor and Watch What Happens with Rich Wilkerson Sr.

Add a Double Portion of Honor and Watch What Happens with Rich Wilkerson Sr.

Honor is a choice, an act of humility. Everyone human deserves it. Listen as guest Rich Wilkerson Sr. discusses the importance of honor in the home and church. Hear stories of how he has honored others and taught his children about honor. After listening to this interview you will know why honor is the key to relationships, faith, and life. Read more about honor in Wilkerson's new book "I Choose Honor."

34 Minutes • 2 months ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Rich Wilkerson Sr.

 

Honor is a choice, an act of humility. Everyone human deserves it. Listen as guest Rich Wilkerson Sr. discusses the importance of honor in the home and church.

 

Hear stories of how he has honored others and taught his children about honor. After listening to this interview, you will know why honor is the key to relationships, faith, and life. Read more about honor in Wilkerson's new book "I Choose Honor."

 

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: I learned a lot about honor from our visit to Africa. I saw man honor women, women honor men, children honor their teachers and teachers honor their administrators. That was a new one for me. I watched as men stood up at the dinner table when a woman left the table or joined it. I watched a room full of children stand to their feet when a teacher or any adult entered the room, I watched a church of over 15,000 people stand when the Word of God was carried into the pulpit. I remember the American pastor tell me, don't try this at home. Western culture does not embrace any effort to display honor. I have to report, sadly, that he was right. In my opinion, Western culture has created a brilliant testimony of dishonor, disrespect and outright rebuke for their fellow man. There's very little evidence now that our country was built upon basic principles of honor, but this country was built on it. I don't see a lot of it anymore. When honor does show up, it's misunderstood and often mocked. Perhaps it's even ridiculed. Yet, in the face of mockery, some have chosen God's way of abundant living. They choose to freely give all the honor they can muster. My guest today is one such man of God. He's written a book titled I Choose Honor: The Rey to Relationships, Faith and Life. I'm going to read that title again because I'd like it to be seared into your mind and so you can rush out and get it when it's released. His name is Rich Wilkerson Sr., and the name of the book is I Choose Honor: The Rey to Relationships, Faith and Life. So,

 

Dr. Steve Greene: I just I could talk about this book for a long time. In fact, my producer now is very worried that we're going to go too long because she knows how much I love this topic and how under spoken of I think it is. It's certainly been under written about. So, how did you get here? How did you write this book? What brought you to this place?

 

Rich Wilkerson Books

·         I Choose Honor: The Key to Relationships, Faith and Life

·         Inside Out: How Everyday People Become Extraordinary Leaders

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr. I don't know. I think I came to the place where honor had opened so many doors for me through the years and I’m now well into my sixth decade of living and it just keeps blessing me. When you bless you others, you get blessed. When you honor others, you're honored. It opens doors. In the last two years, I’ve had doors opened to me in the Muslim world that I wasn't sourcing my way into. I didn't have a board sitting on the corner of some Muslim country. It just opened up through honor. I thought to myself, this works in just about every arena if not all that I've ever been in, in my life.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, why don't we start … I sure I understand your heart and I understand everything you've just said because of my trip to Africa and my lifestyle since that day. but could you try to start us off on the right foot by defining honor in the way that you're using it in your book; in a way that God means it when He says to honor Him and one another? How do you define it?

 

About Rich Wilkerson Sr.

·         Founder of Peacemakers

·         Senior Pastor of Trinity Church in Miami, Florida

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: I've always looked at honor as an act of humility and humbling of oneself. I feel that every person that God has created is someone that I need to honor. There's a word in the Greek known as proskuneo; it's a New Testament Greek word, and it means to kiss upward. It means to, kind of like bow and kiss a hand of someone in authority over you, as a dog licking a master's hand. It was a sign that someone's greater than me. This is not just true of people who have authority over you. I believe God's called us to kiss up forward and to kiss what people would call downward, lesser people that someone may think they're better than the next person. In God's economy, there's no better than. We're all created in His image and every human deserves honor, in my opinion.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, what do you think is the one biggest cause of the lack of honor? Did you agree with my opening statement that this country was founded on honor? Where did it go, and how did we lose it?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: Oh, totally, totally. where to go. We lost it through … the very thing that made this country great is the very thing that's killing us, and that's freedom. Total freedom is anarchy. Total freedom means there's no form, there's no yellow lines down the center of the highway. That's not freedom at all. Freedom without form is anarchy. Now with people, the vitriol, and the just the way we treat one another, I think that social media gives people an opportunity to stay in their closet and say something to a million people, or just two followers. It is unabashed and it’s unashamed, and it's heartbreaking. I was raised in an era where you honored your parents, you honored public school teachers. I was actually amazed with corporal punishment. If I got a paddling at my public elementary school, I was going to get a paddling when I got home. My parents honored the teachers. Everybody backed everybody up, and now everybody's kind of on their own.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Worse than that, they attack people who try to correct us. They know there's no room for it. Don’t correct my child, I'll take care of that. So, tell me what would change, pastor, if we got back to that place where there was honor in our schools, there was honor in our homes; let's go to church. What would happen if we honored our pastors and leaders in the church? How would things change literally describe some of the things we'd see?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: I'm not gonna say you're not going to have conflict. We all have brains and all of us have a tendency to think a little different than the other guy, no matter what dogma we are raised under. We still have different slants on that and I'm sure you understand that. Yet I think there would be a peace to it. There would be a love connected to it. When I disagree, we could disagree agreeably. We could leave, we just wouldn't leave bad a conversation. I think that's where it's at it. I was raised with healthy conversation, healthy disagreement around the table. But there was no like, I'm not mad when I walked away. It's just Mom and Dad always wanted there to be … this may be the wrong term, but a devil's advocate at the table. Dad, Mom and my in-laws as well. They didn't accept the thought of if everybody agreed on everything, you didn't learn anything. So, they would always give another opinion to make you as a child think better thoughts to uplift your thinking. I've always felt like when you elevate your thinking, you elevate your living.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, you raised a pastor. You have a pastor’s son. Tell me how it worked in your home. How did you teach him to honor and to carry this trait forward? How did you do it?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: My dad was the most wonderful and fun man … My dad could make legalism fun. My dad would say, son, we don't do this. And, isn't that exciting? I go Dad, that's great, because 100 years ago, Pentecostals were against everything. You couldn't dance, you couldn't go to movies. So here I am, an athlete. I’m well known. I'm one of the 10 most wanted men at my high school, and I couldn't do anything of the things my friends did. But, I'd always put a positive spin on it just like my dad did. Dad was a great leader and he was he was an honorable man and he loved me like nobody loves me. I was connected to him and I would do whatever he wanted me to. Through the years, I let up on my own boys and compared it to the way my dad raised me with certain standards and all. Not all the standards my dad taught me did I actually buy into, but I didn't argue with them. Then when I left home and became a man I said Dad, this is what I'm gonna do in this certain area. I just want you to know that I feel like this is OK for me. He said son, you're an adult, you do what you feel. So, there was honor both ways. As I became a man, Dad realized that in some of the things he was pushing the envelope based upon the state that were raised in and the domination we were raised in he let up. So, it works both ways.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: In your home, how did you teach honor? Give me some specific examples of how you taught your children to honor.

 

Rich Wilkerson: One of the most wonderful things that my wife and I did and that was when the second boy showed up, it was hard to do with one child because we were always honoring him, saying good things, blessing him and then teaching him how to respond. I remember with our oldest son, my wife, Robyn and I, would stand him on a table and teach him how to respond to people. If someone gives you something say thank you so very much and so she would stay there with him until he did that. She's going to give you some money. He'd look away and she stops, hey wait a minute, you look at me and say thank you so very much until he got that. But then when the second son … by the way there's four sons and the second one came along and when he got old enough he was taught the same things. But then, I suppose Rich was about three and John Fulton was about six when we started honor at the table. The way you honored the table was on each other's birthday, and it was on Rich’s birthday, three years old, he had to look at his big brother and say, I honor you today because you were nice to me that one day a year ago. It was tough for all of these boys. They had to yield and finally find out something good to say about the brother, something good and honorable to say about Dad, something good and honorable to say about Mom. We've done that through ever since. The third son was brain damaged to meningitis when he was six months old, and he's still with us. But he's 32, and he’s still wonderful, he’s good with the computer, has his driver's license. But anyway, he will be with us and his favorite verses. lo, “I am with you always, even at the ends of the earth.” But Graham, it was sometimes difficult for him to speak early on, he had to learn to speak. But even Graham would have to honor everybody on their birthday. And then we would honor each one on their birthday. So, that was the honor circle. That was the earliest of our family honor circles. Then we took it to our team members. When I was in evangelist, we had about 11 employees. We would do that with all of our employees. On their birthday, they would all say something around the circle. Then we took it to our church staff. We moved to Miami 20 years ago. Sometimes we’d do it in our Wednesday evening prayer meetings. But that's how we so we started teaching honor with our church as well.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, you raised your children in a fishbowl, and they felt it. You know what it was like. You were raised that way. How's the fishbowl different today for kids than it was as you were being raised?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: My context is much different than many people. I say that because I think most people that would be listening to this would go to an average size church, maybe 500 or smaller, where the pastor’s children, for instance, would be much more in a fishbowl like I was when I was a young boy growing up. But today, the fishbowl is so big that I don't know if my kids really picked up a lot of criticism about their lifestyle. There is a just a bigger team that was with us. But I think that young people, if they're convinced that you love them, you honor them, and you expect the same from them in the home I think they're able to handle life outside the house easier. Even criticism, I think, they can take much better because they don't really respond with criticism. In other words, if they're criticize, we don't criticize back.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Rich Wilkerson Sr., please visit cpnshows.com.

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Rich Wilkerson Sr.

 

Honor is a choice, an act of humility. Everyone human deserves it. Listen as guest Rich Wilkerson Sr. discusses the importance of honor in the home and church.

 

Hear stories of how he has honored others and taught his children about honor. After listening to this interview, you will know why honor is the key to relationships, faith, and life. Read more about honor in Wilkerson's new book "I Choose Honor."

 

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: I learned a lot about honor from our visit to Africa. I saw man honor women, women honor men, children honor their teachers and teachers honor their administrators. That was a new one for me. I watched as men stood up at the dinner table when a woman left the table or joined it. I watched a room full of children stand to their feet when a teacher or any adult entered the room, I watched a church of over 15,000 people stand when the Word of God was carried into the pulpit. I remember the American pastor tell me, don't try this at home. Western culture does not embrace any effort to display honor. I have to report, sadly, that he was right. In my opinion, Western culture has created a brilliant testimony of dishonor, disrespect and outright rebuke for their fellow man. There's very little evidence now that our country was built upon basic principles of honor, but this country was built on it. I don't see a lot of it anymore. When honor does show up, it's misunderstood and often mocked. Perhaps it's even ridiculed. Yet, in the face of mockery, some have chosen God's way of abundant living. They choose to freely give all the honor they can muster. My guest today is one such man of God. He's written a book titled I Choose Honor: The Rey to Relationships, Faith and Life. I'm going to read that title again because I'd like it to be seared into your mind and so you can rush out and get it when it's released. His name is Rich Wilkerson Sr., and the name of the book is I Choose Honor: The Rey to Relationships, Faith and Life. So,

 

Dr. Steve Greene: I just I could talk about this book for a long time. In fact, my producer now is very worried that we're going to go too long because she knows how much I love this topic and how under spoken of I think it is. It's certainly been under written about. So, how did you get here? How did you write this book? What brought you to this place?

 

Rich Wilkerson Books

·         I Choose Honor: The Key to Relationships, Faith and Life

·         Inside Out: How Everyday People Become Extraordinary Leaders

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr. I don't know. I think I came to the place where honor had opened so many doors for me through the years and I’m now well into my sixth decade of living and it just keeps blessing me. When you bless you others, you get blessed. When you honor others, you're honored. It opens doors. In the last two years, I’ve had doors opened to me in the Muslim world that I wasn't sourcing my way into. I didn't have a board sitting on the corner of some Muslim country. It just opened up through honor. I thought to myself, this works in just about every arena if not all that I've ever been in, in my life.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, why don't we start … I sure I understand your heart and I understand everything you've just said because of my trip to Africa and my lifestyle since that day. but could you try to start us off on the right foot by defining honor in the way that you're using it in your book; in a way that God means it when He says to honor Him and one another? How do you define it?

 

About Rich Wilkerson Sr.

·         Founder of Peacemakers

·         Senior Pastor of Trinity Church in Miami, Florida

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: I've always looked at honor as an act of humility and humbling of oneself. I feel that every person that God has created is someone that I need to honor. There's a word in the Greek known as proskuneo; it's a New Testament Greek word, and it means to kiss upward. It means to, kind of like bow and kiss a hand of someone in authority over you, as a dog licking a master's hand. It was a sign that someone's greater than me. This is not just true of people who have authority over you. I believe God's called us to kiss up forward and to kiss what people would call downward, lesser people that someone may think they're better than the next person. In God's economy, there's no better than. We're all created in His image and every human deserves honor, in my opinion.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, what do you think is the one biggest cause of the lack of honor? Did you agree with my opening statement that this country was founded on honor? Where did it go, and how did we lose it?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: Oh, totally, totally. where to go. We lost it through … the very thing that made this country great is the very thing that's killing us, and that's freedom. Total freedom is anarchy. Total freedom means there's no form, there's no yellow lines down the center of the highway. That's not freedom at all. Freedom without form is anarchy. Now with people, the vitriol, and the just the way we treat one another, I think that social media gives people an opportunity to stay in their closet and say something to a million people, or just two followers. It is unabashed and it’s unashamed, and it's heartbreaking. I was raised in an era where you honored your parents, you honored public school teachers. I was actually amazed with corporal punishment. If I got a paddling at my public elementary school, I was going to get a paddling when I got home. My parents honored the teachers. Everybody backed everybody up, and now everybody's kind of on their own.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Worse than that, they attack people who try to correct us. They know there's no room for it. Don’t correct my child, I'll take care of that. So, tell me what would change, pastor, if we got back to that place where there was honor in our schools, there was honor in our homes; let's go to church. What would happen if we honored our pastors and leaders in the church? How would things change literally describe some of the things we'd see?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: I'm not gonna say you're not going to have conflict. We all have brains and all of us have a tendency to think a little different than the other guy, no matter what dogma we are raised under. We still have different slants on that and I'm sure you understand that. Yet I think there would be a peace to it. There would be a love connected to it. When I disagree, we could disagree agreeably. We could leave, we just wouldn't leave bad a conversation. I think that's where it's at it. I was raised with healthy conversation, healthy disagreement around the table. But there was no like, I'm not mad when I walked away. It's just Mom and Dad always wanted there to be … this may be the wrong term, but a devil's advocate at the table. Dad, Mom and my in-laws as well. They didn't accept the thought of if everybody agreed on everything, you didn't learn anything. So, they would always give another opinion to make you as a child think better thoughts to uplift your thinking. I've always felt like when you elevate your thinking, you elevate your living.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, you raised a pastor. You have a pastor’s son. Tell me how it worked in your home. How did you teach him to honor and to carry this trait forward? How did you do it?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: My dad was the most wonderful and fun man … My dad could make legalism fun. My dad would say, son, we don't do this. And, isn't that exciting? I go Dad, that's great, because 100 years ago, Pentecostals were against everything. You couldn't dance, you couldn't go to movies. So here I am, an athlete. I’m well known. I'm one of the 10 most wanted men at my high school, and I couldn't do anything of the things my friends did. But, I'd always put a positive spin on it just like my dad did. Dad was a great leader and he was he was an honorable man and he loved me like nobody loves me. I was connected to him and I would do whatever he wanted me to. Through the years, I let up on my own boys and compared it to the way my dad raised me with certain standards and all. Not all the standards my dad taught me did I actually buy into, but I didn't argue with them. Then when I left home and became a man I said Dad, this is what I'm gonna do in this certain area. I just want you to know that I feel like this is OK for me. He said son, you're an adult, you do what you feel. So, there was honor both ways. As I became a man, Dad realized that in some of the things he was pushing the envelope based upon the state that were raised in and the domination we were raised in he let up. So, it works both ways.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: In your home, how did you teach honor? Give me some specific examples of how you taught your children to honor.

 

Rich Wilkerson: One of the most wonderful things that my wife and I did and that was when the second boy showed up, it was hard to do with one child because we were always honoring him, saying good things, blessing him and then teaching him how to respond. I remember with our oldest son, my wife, Robyn and I, would stand him on a table and teach him how to respond to people. If someone gives you something say thank you so very much and so she would stay there with him until he did that. She's going to give you some money. He'd look away and she stops, hey wait a minute, you look at me and say thank you so very much until he got that. But then when the second son … by the way there's four sons and the second one came along and when he got old enough he was taught the same things. But then, I suppose Rich was about three and John Fulton was about six when we started honor at the table. The way you honored the table was on each other's birthday, and it was on Rich’s birthday, three years old, he had to look at his big brother and say, I honor you today because you were nice to me that one day a year ago. It was tough for all of these boys. They had to yield and finally find out something good to say about the brother, something good and honorable to say about Dad, something good and honorable to say about Mom. We've done that through ever since. The third son was brain damaged to meningitis when he was six months old, and he's still with us. But he's 32, and he’s still wonderful, he’s good with the computer, has his driver's license. But anyway, he will be with us and his favorite verses. lo, “I am with you always, even at the ends of the earth.” But Graham, it was sometimes difficult for him to speak early on, he had to learn to speak. But even Graham would have to honor everybody on their birthday. And then we would honor each one on their birthday. So, that was the honor circle. That was the earliest of our family honor circles. Then we took it to our team members. When I was in evangelist, we had about 11 employees. We would do that with all of our employees. On their birthday, they would all say something around the circle. Then we took it to our church staff. We moved to Miami 20 years ago. Sometimes we’d do it in our Wednesday evening prayer meetings. But that's how we so we started teaching honor with our church as well.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, you raised your children in a fishbowl, and they felt it. You know what it was like. You were raised that way. How's the fishbowl different today for kids than it was as you were being raised?

 

Rich Wilkerson Sr.: My context is much different than many people. I say that because I think most people that would be listening to this would go to an average size church, maybe 500 or smaller, where the pastor’s children, for instance, would be much more in a fishbowl like I was when I was a young boy growing up. But today, the fishbowl is so big that I don't know if my kids really picked up a lot of criticism about their lifestyle. There is a just a bigger team that was with us. But I think that young people, if they're convinced that you love them, you honor them, and you expect the same from them in the home I think they're able to handle life outside the house easier. Even criticism, I think, they can take much better because they don't really respond with criticism. In other words, if they're criticize, we don't criticize back.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Rich Wilkerson Sr., please visit cpnshows.com.

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

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Add a Double Portion of Honor and Watch What Happens with Rich Wilkerson Sr.