An Investigators Review of Job's Life

An Investigators Review of Job's Life

Challenge what you believe or have been told about the righteousness of Job. Listen as corporate investigator and former investigative reporter Maribeth Vander Weele breaks down the story as if it were a case file to prove Job was guilty of unrighteousness. Hear the break down of the characters with a conclusion on if God was capricious or not. You can read more about her findings on Job in her book "The Joy of Job."

37 Minutes • 12 days ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Maribeth Vander Weele

Challenge what you believe or told about the righteousness of Job. Listen as corporate investigator and former investigative reporter Maribeth Vander Weele breaks down the story as if it were a case file to prove Job was guilty of unrighteousness.

Hear the breakdown of the characters with a conclusion on if God was capacious or not. You can read more about her findings on Job in her book The Joy of Job.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: Parents must often discern truth in their household. Usually it's a question like, who's been eating those cookies? I’ve heard my mother asked that question of my two brothers me way too many times. The answer could have been either, both, or all of the above. Usually what gave it away was one of us had chipmunk cheeks and could give it away. Somebody was eating cookies in that house. My mom was to going to find out who. Obviously, levels of discernment increase as time passes. The ability to discern what's going on in our house changes with age and difficult situations. I remember my parents caught me in a difficult situation when I was writing in my journal. I started writing in a journal, and this won't surprise most of you, at about age 10 to 12. By 15, I was fully journaling. That's when my mother picked it up. No blame, no foul, they were protecting me. They picked it up and sort of leafing through it. They found a section that they began to discern incorrectly. They read some random writings because basically, it was a messy time for us. I was a child of divorced parents at a time when it wasn't very common. I was in a new school, a new area. I was an outcast and I felt very much like an outcast and my Dad liked to think he was Perry Mason. Every time that he was going to question me about where I was, what was I doing, he went into investigative reporter mode and he asked me questions until I turned purple. But when he read this journal, he tried to discern what I meant by my writing, when I wasn't even able to discern it. Because what I had been doing and what they had picked up on was that I was randomly writing lyrics from certain songs I'd listened to. When you look at them, they don't sound very pro-life. In other words, I might have come across suicidal, because I might have been attracted to some of the darker lines. I don't remember being suicidal or having any of those thoughts, but I do remember the songs and some of the lines from them.

·         The Joy of Job: Gold Medal Winner of the 2019 Illumination Book Award for Theology

·         In a starred review, Publisher’s Weekly Booklife recognizes Joy of Job for it’s “excellent exegesis” and “refreshing insight.”

·         Kirkus Reviews: “Delilghtfully unrelenting interrogation of the Biblical text” and it’s “profound, moral meaning.”

So, this interrogation from my father lasted for over an hour. I didn't have an attorney. No one objected to the line of questioning as being subjected to. He wanted to know the meaning behind what I wrote. I couldn't possibly tell him; it was too random. It meant nothing to me. But to this day, I can tell you this. I expect my journal to be read. I've never gotten over the fact that my journal is private. I don't think it is. I think at any given moment, up over the last 40 years, someone could pick up my journal and asked me about it and expect me to give an account to discern what I was going through, to think about what that meant. But you know what? All I could say is God knew my heart in that moment. As a teenager, God knows my heart with every note that I make my journal today. As someone who values transparency as much as I do, as a leader, I pray this. I pray this every day and I have witnesses that God would reveal the condition of my heart. Search me, O God, and show me. I'm all about discernment. But I want the sermon to start with me.

About Maribeth Vander Weele

·         Award-winning investigative reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times

·         Book Reclaiming Our Schools: The Struggle for Chicago School Reform became a roadmap for the reform of the $3.8 billion Chicago Public School system

·         Later became Inspector General of the Chicago Public School System

·         Launched the Vander Weele Group in Chicago in 2003

·         Clients range from Fortune 500 companies and hedge funds to federal agencies and educational institutions

I'm so excited to introduce you to our guest today. I’ll tell you about her book in a minute. But I just want to tell you a little bit about our guest. She's an author, and so many other things. Her name is Maribeth Vander Weele, and let me tell you just a little bit about her. She's a former investigative journalist and government inspector general. That means you're not doing anything past her. Maribeth is an American author, and of course, a business owner. Her life's work revolves around unearthing obscure but significant information to discern deception. So, there's no way that I'm going to be able to deceive her today because she's going to discern it. If I ask a a nosy question, she’s going to smell it coming. She'll know about it. She's an astute, painstaking fact finder. She communicates complicated subjects with clarity. I believe this about her because I've read most of her book. I'm almost all the way through it. The name of her book is the Joy of Job and Investigator’s Perspective of the most righteous man on earth. Please take that in, audience. Think about what we're going to hear here with this interview. This great author, this researcher, this woman who's so hard to put anything past is going to take an up close and personal look at Job. It's going to investigate his writings and his friends, and what God says about him, and put that all together and give you her investigator’s perspective.

So, I've got to start by asking you this nosy question. How could someone with your background and your great success as a newspaper journalist, including winning awards and recognition as a journalist, how could you come to a book like this?

Maribeth Vander Weele Books

·         The Joy of Job: An Investigator’s Perspective of the Most Righteous Man on Earth

·         Reclaiming Our Schools: The Struggle for Chicago School Reform

·          

Maribeth Vander Weele: Well, it started one day when I opened Job 29. Like an investigative reporter, we always start at the end of the book because we're often on deadline. If someone plops a big school budget on our desks and we have to get something in by eight o'clock, we start at the end because that's where the things that people don't want you to see are hidden. So, I started just subconsciously reading Job 29. And, Job 29 is talking about the old days when he walks to the city and he took a seat in the square. He says essentially, the young men stepped aside and the old men rose to their feet. The chief men refrain from speaking and they covered their mouths with their hands. He talks about them, that their tongues stuck to the roof of their mouths when they saw him. Whoever heard of him spoke well of him and commended him. Then he says they waited for me as showers and drank in my words, as a spring rain. When I smiled at them, they scarcely believed it; the light of my face was precious to them. Then in the end he said I thought my glory would never fade. This was astonishing to me because I'd always considered Job a righteous man. This was anything but righteous. It sounded more like a rock star, or a politician, or really, it sounded like the New Testament Pharisees that Christ talked about, the Pharisees that just longed to be greeted in the marketplace and with respect. The apostle Paul said that if he were trying to please man, he could not please God. And Moses was the most humble man on earth. But none of this sounded like Job. So, I began pouring through the book. I noticed that Job listed 24 ways in which he was righteous, at least 24 ways. It just became a mission to find out who this character was.

Dr. Steve Greene: So, I'm going to probe you as a journalist, and we're doing an interview to understand what the journalist found by doing her work. As you began to dig into this story, what started to pop up for you? What did you see in your reporter notes?

Maribeth Vander Weele: One thing that struck me is the author’s use of a throwaway line. The throwaway line is something I teach in the investigative profession. Often the last thing that someone says as they are walking out the door … the computers are closed up, the coats are on and the person has something that they've been wanting to say, and it pops out either consciously or subconsciously. So, for example, in investigations, there was a day when my team was interviewing someone about something completely unrelated to snow plowing and the gentleman said, as he was walking out the door, I don't know how they did all that snow plowing anyway. Being trained in the art of a throwaway line is detecting it, our staff went back and found that the company he was talking about had built hundreds of lots at which the claimed to plow snow. Many of these buildings didn't even have a lot. So, the book of Job, I really believe the author set it up so there was a lot of talk, a lot of bluster. There are accusations going back and forth. Then he would tuck these throwaway lines in there that were just packed with meaning, incredibly powerful. So that's one of the tools that I looked at.

Dr. Steve Greene: Let me back up a minute. Give me an example of a throwaway line that you might hear in a home, that our listeners could identify with, or maybe a church, where it makes you pause enough to want to ask a follow up or to start digging. It would alarm you, it would send off a red light in your mind. Could you give me an example of that?

Maribeth Vander Weele: In the home? I have plenty of examples from my profession. For example, a fraudster would say I have clients in the Cayman Islands. Well, it turns out that he's money laundering in the Cayman Islands. So, the Cayman Islands are on his mind. There are different types of throwaway lines. There is one that is says just truth, right? Then there's another that talks about a subject; Job kept talking about security. That turns out to be the heart of the matter of the sin that he was accused of by his friends; taking security which is a pledge when you give a loan. So, Job kept on talking about security. One of the powerful examples Job, now keep in mind this is a man who says his whole life revolves around helping needy people: the widows the fatherless, the blind, the lame, the family servants and so forth. He says about these boys, these starving boys living among the rocks, who he hates and they hate him. He says what use was the strength of their hands to me since their vigor had gone from them? Now that's just a startling comment about someone who claims that he's done all this benevolence for everybody. So, he's actually saying they were too weak to work for me. Now, these boys, once Job faces this devastation, they're mocking him and they're singing songs about him. Then Job says he would with the saints put their fathers with the sheep dogs. Now this is just tucked in there. It's a word, it has no context. There's just a number of these. For example, at the end of Job when he says, I had only heard of you to the Lord. I had only heard of you. This just hit me like a ton of bricks. He had been a religious person all those years and he admitted he had only heard of you. And then you have Eliphaz, who tells Job you demanded security from your relatives for no reason.

We could go on and on and on. But those are just some of the examples. Here's another one. The three friends stop talking to Job because he was, quote, righteous in his own eyes. Proverbs 28:11, says, the rich are wise in their own eyes, one who's poor and discerning sees how deluded they are. So that phrase in their own eyes was very clear … it wasn't everybody else's opinion. It was it was Job's opinion, but he was righteous. In fact, not one of the witnesses in the book agrees with him that he is righteous.

To listen to the podcast with Maribeth Vander Weele, please click here.

Connect with Maribeth Vander Weele

·         On Facebook

·         Vanderweelegroup.com

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Maribeth Vander Weele

Challenge what you believe or told about the righteousness of Job. Listen as corporate investigator and former investigative reporter Maribeth Vander Weele breaks down the story as if it were a case file to prove Job was guilty of unrighteousness.

Hear the breakdown of the characters with a conclusion on if God was capacious or not. You can read more about her findings on Job in her book The Joy of Job.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: Parents must often discern truth in their household. Usually it's a question like, who's been eating those cookies? I’ve heard my mother asked that question of my two brothers me way too many times. The answer could have been either, both, or all of the above. Usually what gave it away was one of us had chipmunk cheeks and could give it away. Somebody was eating cookies in that house. My mom was to going to find out who. Obviously, levels of discernment increase as time passes. The ability to discern what's going on in our house changes with age and difficult situations. I remember my parents caught me in a difficult situation when I was writing in my journal. I started writing in a journal, and this won't surprise most of you, at about age 10 to 12. By 15, I was fully journaling. That's when my mother picked it up. No blame, no foul, they were protecting me. They picked it up and sort of leafing through it. They found a section that they began to discern incorrectly. They read some random writings because basically, it was a messy time for us. I was a child of divorced parents at a time when it wasn't very common. I was in a new school, a new area. I was an outcast and I felt very much like an outcast and my Dad liked to think he was Perry Mason. Every time that he was going to question me about where I was, what was I doing, he went into investigative reporter mode and he asked me questions until I turned purple. But when he read this journal, he tried to discern what I meant by my writing, when I wasn't even able to discern it. Because what I had been doing and what they had picked up on was that I was randomly writing lyrics from certain songs I'd listened to. When you look at them, they don't sound very pro-life. In other words, I might have come across suicidal, because I might have been attracted to some of the darker lines. I don't remember being suicidal or having any of those thoughts, but I do remember the songs and some of the lines from them.

·         The Joy of Job: Gold Medal Winner of the 2019 Illumination Book Award for Theology

·         In a starred review, Publisher’s Weekly Booklife recognizes Joy of Job for it’s “excellent exegesis” and “refreshing insight.”

·         Kirkus Reviews: “Delilghtfully unrelenting interrogation of the Biblical text” and it’s “profound, moral meaning.”

So, this interrogation from my father lasted for over an hour. I didn't have an attorney. No one objected to the line of questioning as being subjected to. He wanted to know the meaning behind what I wrote. I couldn't possibly tell him; it was too random. It meant nothing to me. But to this day, I can tell you this. I expect my journal to be read. I've never gotten over the fact that my journal is private. I don't think it is. I think at any given moment, up over the last 40 years, someone could pick up my journal and asked me about it and expect me to give an account to discern what I was going through, to think about what that meant. But you know what? All I could say is God knew my heart in that moment. As a teenager, God knows my heart with every note that I make my journal today. As someone who values transparency as much as I do, as a leader, I pray this. I pray this every day and I have witnesses that God would reveal the condition of my heart. Search me, O God, and show me. I'm all about discernment. But I want the sermon to start with me.

About Maribeth Vander Weele

·         Award-winning investigative reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times

·         Book Reclaiming Our Schools: The Struggle for Chicago School Reform became a roadmap for the reform of the $3.8 billion Chicago Public School system

·         Later became Inspector General of the Chicago Public School System

·         Launched the Vander Weele Group in Chicago in 2003

·         Clients range from Fortune 500 companies and hedge funds to federal agencies and educational institutions

I'm so excited to introduce you to our guest today. I’ll tell you about her book in a minute. But I just want to tell you a little bit about our guest. She's an author, and so many other things. Her name is Maribeth Vander Weele, and let me tell you just a little bit about her. She's a former investigative journalist and government inspector general. That means you're not doing anything past her. Maribeth is an American author, and of course, a business owner. Her life's work revolves around unearthing obscure but significant information to discern deception. So, there's no way that I'm going to be able to deceive her today because she's going to discern it. If I ask a a nosy question, she’s going to smell it coming. She'll know about it. She's an astute, painstaking fact finder. She communicates complicated subjects with clarity. I believe this about her because I've read most of her book. I'm almost all the way through it. The name of her book is the Joy of Job and Investigator’s Perspective of the most righteous man on earth. Please take that in, audience. Think about what we're going to hear here with this interview. This great author, this researcher, this woman who's so hard to put anything past is going to take an up close and personal look at Job. It's going to investigate his writings and his friends, and what God says about him, and put that all together and give you her investigator’s perspective.

So, I've got to start by asking you this nosy question. How could someone with your background and your great success as a newspaper journalist, including winning awards and recognition as a journalist, how could you come to a book like this?

Maribeth Vander Weele Books

·         The Joy of Job: An Investigator’s Perspective of the Most Righteous Man on Earth

·         Reclaiming Our Schools: The Struggle for Chicago School Reform

·          

Maribeth Vander Weele: Well, it started one day when I opened Job 29. Like an investigative reporter, we always start at the end of the book because we're often on deadline. If someone plops a big school budget on our desks and we have to get something in by eight o'clock, we start at the end because that's where the things that people don't want you to see are hidden. So, I started just subconsciously reading Job 29. And, Job 29 is talking about the old days when he walks to the city and he took a seat in the square. He says essentially, the young men stepped aside and the old men rose to their feet. The chief men refrain from speaking and they covered their mouths with their hands. He talks about them, that their tongues stuck to the roof of their mouths when they saw him. Whoever heard of him spoke well of him and commended him. Then he says they waited for me as showers and drank in my words, as a spring rain. When I smiled at them, they scarcely believed it; the light of my face was precious to them. Then in the end he said I thought my glory would never fade. This was astonishing to me because I'd always considered Job a righteous man. This was anything but righteous. It sounded more like a rock star, or a politician, or really, it sounded like the New Testament Pharisees that Christ talked about, the Pharisees that just longed to be greeted in the marketplace and with respect. The apostle Paul said that if he were trying to please man, he could not please God. And Moses was the most humble man on earth. But none of this sounded like Job. So, I began pouring through the book. I noticed that Job listed 24 ways in which he was righteous, at least 24 ways. It just became a mission to find out who this character was.

Dr. Steve Greene: So, I'm going to probe you as a journalist, and we're doing an interview to understand what the journalist found by doing her work. As you began to dig into this story, what started to pop up for you? What did you see in your reporter notes?

Maribeth Vander Weele: One thing that struck me is the author’s use of a throwaway line. The throwaway line is something I teach in the investigative profession. Often the last thing that someone says as they are walking out the door … the computers are closed up, the coats are on and the person has something that they've been wanting to say, and it pops out either consciously or subconsciously. So, for example, in investigations, there was a day when my team was interviewing someone about something completely unrelated to snow plowing and the gentleman said, as he was walking out the door, I don't know how they did all that snow plowing anyway. Being trained in the art of a throwaway line is detecting it, our staff went back and found that the company he was talking about had built hundreds of lots at which the claimed to plow snow. Many of these buildings didn't even have a lot. So, the book of Job, I really believe the author set it up so there was a lot of talk, a lot of bluster. There are accusations going back and forth. Then he would tuck these throwaway lines in there that were just packed with meaning, incredibly powerful. So that's one of the tools that I looked at.

Dr. Steve Greene: Let me back up a minute. Give me an example of a throwaway line that you might hear in a home, that our listeners could identify with, or maybe a church, where it makes you pause enough to want to ask a follow up or to start digging. It would alarm you, it would send off a red light in your mind. Could you give me an example of that?

Maribeth Vander Weele: In the home? I have plenty of examples from my profession. For example, a fraudster would say I have clients in the Cayman Islands. Well, it turns out that he's money laundering in the Cayman Islands. So, the Cayman Islands are on his mind. There are different types of throwaway lines. There is one that is says just truth, right? Then there's another that talks about a subject; Job kept talking about security. That turns out to be the heart of the matter of the sin that he was accused of by his friends; taking security which is a pledge when you give a loan. So, Job kept on talking about security. One of the powerful examples Job, now keep in mind this is a man who says his whole life revolves around helping needy people: the widows the fatherless, the blind, the lame, the family servants and so forth. He says about these boys, these starving boys living among the rocks, who he hates and they hate him. He says what use was the strength of their hands to me since their vigor had gone from them? Now that's just a startling comment about someone who claims that he's done all this benevolence for everybody. So, he's actually saying they were too weak to work for me. Now, these boys, once Job faces this devastation, they're mocking him and they're singing songs about him. Then Job says he would with the saints put their fathers with the sheep dogs. Now this is just tucked in there. It's a word, it has no context. There's just a number of these. For example, at the end of Job when he says, I had only heard of you to the Lord. I had only heard of you. This just hit me like a ton of bricks. He had been a religious person all those years and he admitted he had only heard of you. And then you have Eliphaz, who tells Job you demanded security from your relatives for no reason.

We could go on and on and on. But those are just some of the examples. Here's another one. The three friends stop talking to Job because he was, quote, righteous in his own eyes. Proverbs 28:11, says, the rich are wise in their own eyes, one who's poor and discerning sees how deluded they are. So that phrase in their own eyes was very clear … it wasn't everybody else's opinion. It was it was Job's opinion, but he was righteous. In fact, not one of the witnesses in the book agrees with him that he is righteous.

To listen to the podcast with Maribeth Vander Weele, please click here.

Connect with Maribeth Vander Weele

·         On Facebook

·         Vanderweelegroup.com

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

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An Investigators Review of Job's Life