Engage with God's Word with Dr. Jim Linzey

Engage with God's Word with Dr. Jim Linzey

Be inspired to read God's Word daily when you hear former U.S. Army Major and Chaplain Dr. Jim Linzey tell the story of what inspired the Modern English Version Bible translation. Learn that people still want to read the Word of God in print.

23 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Jim Linzey

Be inspired to read God's Word daily when you hear former U.S. Army Major and Chaplain Dr. Jim Linzey tell the story of what inspired the Modern English Version Bible translation. Learn that people still want to read the Word of God in print.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: This is the Greenelines podcast. I'm Steve Greene on the Charisma Podcast Network. I'd like to tell you about a series that's available to you now through Charisma. Many of you have seen bits and pieces of maybe one of these books, The Deborah Anointing, The Esther Anointing, The Anna Anointing, and The Ruth Anointing, plus a free bonus all in the Solid Rock Series. You're going to get all four anointing books by Michelle McClain-Walters, plus a Charisma subscription and to Life in the Spirit devotions for only $36. I want to say that part of it again. You're going to get all four of those anointing books by Michelle McClain Walters. Plus, you'll receive a Charisma subscription, a subscription to Charisma magazine, and then you'll get two Life in a Spirit devotionals for only $36. Now, you can find this at charismamag.com/anoint. Or, you can just look right here, down below this podcast in the show notes and you'll see the link to charisma mag.com backslash anoint. I know you'll love these books, and I know you'll love the free bonuses and a subscription to charisma magazine. Now let's get to the show.

Dr. Steve Greene: I’m so glad you've joined us. I'm honored to have with me Dr. Jim Linzey, a retired Major, United States Army as a chaplain. I've known you for years, I've known your work. I love the Modern English Version. It's a very preachable version. It's very accurate, good word choices, I guess will be the word for me. I want to talk about that. I don't like it so readable that it doesn't read like the Bible. I don't need King James. But I need something that is at least still the original language, somewhere close. So, tell us about the life of an editor. How does one go about creating a new version?

The MEV on Charisma

·         Modern English Version Bible Translation Hits YouVersion

·         Charisma Media CEO Presents Modern English Version of the Bible to Queen Elizabeth II

·         Charisma House Announces ‘Most Modern Version’ of KJV

·         MEV Spiritual Warfare Bible

Jim Linzey: I'm the chief editor and the executive director of the MEV. I'm the chairman of the translation committee of 47 scholars. That is the same number of scholars that were on the K JV translation committee, and not by design. We did not do that on purpose. It just happened to be that way. At one time we had more than 47, but some had to cancel out for some reason; family pressures and academic pressures teaching at their seminaries. But we ended up with 47. That was not planned. But it's been a very, very delightful work and very hard as well. It's never an easy task to undertake. But the significance or the defining factor for any translation is the source text for the New Testament. Because there's the critical text and then there's the text receptors for the majority text from the Byzantine tradition. The difference in appearance between the two Alexandrian fragments is that they're in all capital letters, and it's really a font called the Alexandria, named after Alexandria, Egypt where most of the fragments were compiled. Byzantine, that's the style of print it was all lowercase letters. But what is very significant about the MEV is that we used the Byzantine texts called the Texas receptus. The majority text is as a later Greek New Testament. With the Byzantine tradition and the Alexandrian tradition, the big debate in academia is which is older, and academia favors the Alexandrian texts, the critical Greek New Testament. They believe that the fragments are older than the Byzantine fragments, which is really a hypothesis and not necessarily true. The reason for that appearance is because done in Alexandria, Egypt and also the Sinai where Alexandrian fragments were preserved, the air the climate is arid and not humid, arid and dry, and the fragments don't deteriorate whereas the Byzantine fragments were in Europe, where there's more humidity and they had to do more copies every several hundred years; copies after copies. Therefore, the existing fragments are not as old. But here is what is very significant and supportive for the Byzantine tradition which we fall under, which gives us so much credibility. We can go all the way back to the second century the Syrian (inaudible), the Syriac (inaudible) means simple version. It's the very first complete Bible that was ever translated from Greek and Hebrew and the subtuagent in what is now known as eastern Syria. There was a Christian community there and scholars there who translated the very first complete Bible. It agrees with the Byzantine tradition 108 times, meaning they had access to the Byzantine fragments back then, proving that they were in existence as early as their earliest Alexandrian fragments, and also the Tiatian diatesseron, which is a harmonization of the Gospels that Taitian completed. He was in that area too, he was a Syriac scholar. He did his own harmonization of the Gospels in the second century, taking out all the redundant stories from the pericopies, which, for the listening audience is a short story or a parable in the Gospels. The gospels are a collection of pericopies. They're not necessarily in chronological order. But Taitian created his own chronology and his own harmony, but he used Alexandrian and Byzantine fragments to translate into Syriac, meaning they used both, they were both in existence. We have a copy of one page of it called the Unsealed 01212, according to the Nestle Alon numbering system, or the dura parchment 24. It's a page from the diatesseron showing that he borrowed from Byzantine and Alexandrian. That’s third century. Now we move into the Patristics, the early church fathers. They quoted communicatively the entire New Testament from the Byzantine fragments. If we had all of our Greek New Testaments today destroyed, we can compile a completed New Testament with Byzantine texts from the church fathers’ writings. They were aware of the Alexandrian and texts and they didn't use them. They used Byzantine for very good reason. It is theorized that they believed that the Alexandria fragments were corrupted. Those are the ones that many Christians today complain about; oh, the NIV and the ESV, they're missing this scripture and that passage. The Syriac (inaudible) had the entire long ending of Mark from the Byzantine. We move into the 1,500s where does (inaudible) Erasmus, a Dutch, Roman Catholic priest and monk compiled the first Greek New Testament from Byzantine fragments and he was aware of the Alexandrian fragments and did not use them. All the Protestant Reformation Bibles use Byzantine fragments. The KJV is from the Texas receptus that Erasmus put together. We move forward to the German Luther New Testament. Martin Luther translated the German New Testament from the Texas receptus. The Eastern Orthodox Bible is based on Byzantine tradition, the Roman Catholic Bible based on the Byzantine tradition, the Anglican Church favors the Byzantine. Most of Protestantism around the world favors Byzantine. So, there's great authority, church authority, giving credence to the Byzantine fragments. This is the backbone of the MEV. And the MEV is the most modern English translation today that is based on the Byzantine tradition.

Dr. Steve Greene: That's why they call it the Modern English version, right?

Jim Linzey: It is the King James Version, but we've simply changed the name for today's reader.

Dr. Steve Greene: So, how would you differentiate for our listeners who are largely not theologians, and studiers of Greek or Hebrew or Aramaic? How would you say what's the major difference? What would we see?

Jim Linzey: The Modern English Version is the King James Version. We simply changed the name. We did the same thing that Oxford University did in 1769. They took the 1611 KJV and updated. It was called the 1769 update. We took that and did another update the same way they did. So, it is the K JV, we simply updated it in the same way that Oxford did. So, it is the K JV people? KJV only people, if they're really dead set on the KJV only, they need to put away their 1769 Oxford update and go back to the 1611 KJV if they're going to really stick to their KJV only doctrine. But they should feel free to add adopt the Modern English Version because it is the KJV.

Dr. Steve Greene: It's just not that formal English vernacular, right?

Jim Linzey: Right. In fact, we've surpassed the New King James Version in modernisms. The New King James version is over 30 years old. They still have a lot of the archaic language in it from 1769. We have simply gone as far as we can, for the 21st century in getting rid of every archaic word that we possibly can for today's reader.

Dr. Steve Greene: I know for a fact that you're also working on a version, version two of the MEV.

Jim Linzey: Yes, we have the second edition, nearly complete. We have some scholars who are working with me to finish that.

Dr. Steve Greene: Why the changes, what are you doing in the second edition?

Jim Linzey: Well, to put it in a humorous light, there are some KJV hangovers. Well, not so much archaic language, but some oddities of the usage of English that we need to make more refined. We need to smooth out some of the English to make it more appropriate for English scholars.

Dr. Steve Greene: So, what has been the feedback you've received from pastors and workers in the industry? What did they say about the MEV?

Jim Linzey: What I hear from a lot of people out in the real world who've read it, they love it. I have people pounding on my door begging for the second edition. There are really no errors in the first edition, just some oddities of the English language like I expressed. But because there's a second edition coming forward, and they've caught wind of it, they're just super excited to get it because they liked the MEV, they liked the first edition. When they heard about the second edition, they've been pounding on my door, calling me up, emailing me, various pastors whom I've never met. So, we have a huge following. I think Charisma Media and Steve Strang and his whole staff have done remarkable in the PR, getting it out there on the market. They've done an incredible job. So, I simply am working very hard to finish the second edition, hopefully by the end of this year. That’s what I'm hoping for.

Connect with Jim Linzey

·         On Twitter

·         Jameslinzey.worpress.com

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Jim Linzey

Be inspired to read God's Word daily when you hear former U.S. Army Major and Chaplain Dr. Jim Linzey tell the story of what inspired the Modern English Version Bible translation. Learn that people still want to read the Word of God in print.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: This is the Greenelines podcast. I'm Steve Greene on the Charisma Podcast Network. I'd like to tell you about a series that's available to you now through Charisma. Many of you have seen bits and pieces of maybe one of these books, The Deborah Anointing, The Esther Anointing, The Anna Anointing, and The Ruth Anointing, plus a free bonus all in the Solid Rock Series. You're going to get all four anointing books by Michelle McClain-Walters, plus a Charisma subscription and to Life in the Spirit devotions for only $36. I want to say that part of it again. You're going to get all four of those anointing books by Michelle McClain Walters. Plus, you'll receive a Charisma subscription, a subscription to Charisma magazine, and then you'll get two Life in a Spirit devotionals for only $36. Now, you can find this at charismamag.com/anoint. Or, you can just look right here, down below this podcast in the show notes and you'll see the link to charisma mag.com backslash anoint. I know you'll love these books, and I know you'll love the free bonuses and a subscription to charisma magazine. Now let's get to the show.

Dr. Steve Greene: I’m so glad you've joined us. I'm honored to have with me Dr. Jim Linzey, a retired Major, United States Army as a chaplain. I've known you for years, I've known your work. I love the Modern English Version. It's a very preachable version. It's very accurate, good word choices, I guess will be the word for me. I want to talk about that. I don't like it so readable that it doesn't read like the Bible. I don't need King James. But I need something that is at least still the original language, somewhere close. So, tell us about the life of an editor. How does one go about creating a new version?

The MEV on Charisma

·         Modern English Version Bible Translation Hits YouVersion

·         Charisma Media CEO Presents Modern English Version of the Bible to Queen Elizabeth II

·         Charisma House Announces ‘Most Modern Version’ of KJV

·         MEV Spiritual Warfare Bible

Jim Linzey: I'm the chief editor and the executive director of the MEV. I'm the chairman of the translation committee of 47 scholars. That is the same number of scholars that were on the K JV translation committee, and not by design. We did not do that on purpose. It just happened to be that way. At one time we had more than 47, but some had to cancel out for some reason; family pressures and academic pressures teaching at their seminaries. But we ended up with 47. That was not planned. But it's been a very, very delightful work and very hard as well. It's never an easy task to undertake. But the significance or the defining factor for any translation is the source text for the New Testament. Because there's the critical text and then there's the text receptors for the majority text from the Byzantine tradition. The difference in appearance between the two Alexandrian fragments is that they're in all capital letters, and it's really a font called the Alexandria, named after Alexandria, Egypt where most of the fragments were compiled. Byzantine, that's the style of print it was all lowercase letters. But what is very significant about the MEV is that we used the Byzantine texts called the Texas receptus. The majority text is as a later Greek New Testament. With the Byzantine tradition and the Alexandrian tradition, the big debate in academia is which is older, and academia favors the Alexandrian texts, the critical Greek New Testament. They believe that the fragments are older than the Byzantine fragments, which is really a hypothesis and not necessarily true. The reason for that appearance is because done in Alexandria, Egypt and also the Sinai where Alexandrian fragments were preserved, the air the climate is arid and not humid, arid and dry, and the fragments don't deteriorate whereas the Byzantine fragments were in Europe, where there's more humidity and they had to do more copies every several hundred years; copies after copies. Therefore, the existing fragments are not as old. But here is what is very significant and supportive for the Byzantine tradition which we fall under, which gives us so much credibility. We can go all the way back to the second century the Syrian (inaudible), the Syriac (inaudible) means simple version. It's the very first complete Bible that was ever translated from Greek and Hebrew and the subtuagent in what is now known as eastern Syria. There was a Christian community there and scholars there who translated the very first complete Bible. It agrees with the Byzantine tradition 108 times, meaning they had access to the Byzantine fragments back then, proving that they were in existence as early as their earliest Alexandrian fragments, and also the Tiatian diatesseron, which is a harmonization of the Gospels that Taitian completed. He was in that area too, he was a Syriac scholar. He did his own harmonization of the Gospels in the second century, taking out all the redundant stories from the pericopies, which, for the listening audience is a short story or a parable in the Gospels. The gospels are a collection of pericopies. They're not necessarily in chronological order. But Taitian created his own chronology and his own harmony, but he used Alexandrian and Byzantine fragments to translate into Syriac, meaning they used both, they were both in existence. We have a copy of one page of it called the Unsealed 01212, according to the Nestle Alon numbering system, or the dura parchment 24. It's a page from the diatesseron showing that he borrowed from Byzantine and Alexandrian. That’s third century. Now we move into the Patristics, the early church fathers. They quoted communicatively the entire New Testament from the Byzantine fragments. If we had all of our Greek New Testaments today destroyed, we can compile a completed New Testament with Byzantine texts from the church fathers’ writings. They were aware of the Alexandrian and texts and they didn't use them. They used Byzantine for very good reason. It is theorized that they believed that the Alexandria fragments were corrupted. Those are the ones that many Christians today complain about; oh, the NIV and the ESV, they're missing this scripture and that passage. The Syriac (inaudible) had the entire long ending of Mark from the Byzantine. We move into the 1,500s where does (inaudible) Erasmus, a Dutch, Roman Catholic priest and monk compiled the first Greek New Testament from Byzantine fragments and he was aware of the Alexandrian fragments and did not use them. All the Protestant Reformation Bibles use Byzantine fragments. The KJV is from the Texas receptus that Erasmus put together. We move forward to the German Luther New Testament. Martin Luther translated the German New Testament from the Texas receptus. The Eastern Orthodox Bible is based on Byzantine tradition, the Roman Catholic Bible based on the Byzantine tradition, the Anglican Church favors the Byzantine. Most of Protestantism around the world favors Byzantine. So, there's great authority, church authority, giving credence to the Byzantine fragments. This is the backbone of the MEV. And the MEV is the most modern English translation today that is based on the Byzantine tradition.

Dr. Steve Greene: That's why they call it the Modern English version, right?

Jim Linzey: It is the King James Version, but we've simply changed the name for today's reader.

Dr. Steve Greene: So, how would you differentiate for our listeners who are largely not theologians, and studiers of Greek or Hebrew or Aramaic? How would you say what's the major difference? What would we see?

Jim Linzey: The Modern English Version is the King James Version. We simply changed the name. We did the same thing that Oxford University did in 1769. They took the 1611 KJV and updated. It was called the 1769 update. We took that and did another update the same way they did. So, it is the K JV, we simply updated it in the same way that Oxford did. So, it is the K JV people? KJV only people, if they're really dead set on the KJV only, they need to put away their 1769 Oxford update and go back to the 1611 KJV if they're going to really stick to their KJV only doctrine. But they should feel free to add adopt the Modern English Version because it is the KJV.

Dr. Steve Greene: It's just not that formal English vernacular, right?

Jim Linzey: Right. In fact, we've surpassed the New King James Version in modernisms. The New King James version is over 30 years old. They still have a lot of the archaic language in it from 1769. We have simply gone as far as we can, for the 21st century in getting rid of every archaic word that we possibly can for today's reader.

Dr. Steve Greene: I know for a fact that you're also working on a version, version two of the MEV.

Jim Linzey: Yes, we have the second edition, nearly complete. We have some scholars who are working with me to finish that.

Dr. Steve Greene: Why the changes, what are you doing in the second edition?

Jim Linzey: Well, to put it in a humorous light, there are some KJV hangovers. Well, not so much archaic language, but some oddities of the usage of English that we need to make more refined. We need to smooth out some of the English to make it more appropriate for English scholars.

Dr. Steve Greene: So, what has been the feedback you've received from pastors and workers in the industry? What did they say about the MEV?

Jim Linzey: What I hear from a lot of people out in the real world who've read it, they love it. I have people pounding on my door begging for the second edition. There are really no errors in the first edition, just some oddities of the English language like I expressed. But because there's a second edition coming forward, and they've caught wind of it, they're just super excited to get it because they liked the MEV, they liked the first edition. When they heard about the second edition, they've been pounding on my door, calling me up, emailing me, various pastors whom I've never met. So, we have a huge following. I think Charisma Media and Steve Strang and his whole staff have done remarkable in the PR, getting it out there on the market. They've done an incredible job. So, I simply am working very hard to finish the second edition, hopefully by the end of this year. That’s what I'm hoping for.

Connect with Jim Linzey

·         On Twitter

·         Jameslinzey.worpress.com

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

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Engage with God's Word with Dr. Jim Linzey