Find Your Way with Carly Fiorina

Find Your Way with Carly Fiorina

Humility, empathy and courage are characteristics to help you lead in your purpose. Former presidential candidate and former CEO of Hewlett-Packard Carly Fiorina believes we need more people to stand as leaders who will solve problems rather than focus on success and winning. She shares from her new book, "Find Your Way."

36 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Carly Fiorina

 

Humility, empathy and courage are characteristics to help you lead in your purpose. Former presidential candidate and former CEO of Hewlett-Packard Carly Fiorina believes we need more people to stand as leaders who will solve problems rather than focus on success and winning.

 

She shares from her new book, Find Your Way.

 

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: Paul was probably the first Christian leader to teach the concept of spiritual focus. We all talk about it a lot. We've learned to talk about focus a lot better since we've had technology. I think many of us think about focus more than we ever have because it's so easy to chase shiny objects now. I've got one in my hand. It's so easy to lose focus. But I want you to notice what Paul had to say in the middle of Philippians chapter 3 around 12 to 14. In the middle of verse 13 he says, I focus on this one thing, I can't tell you how many times I write my one thing down as I begin my day. And, I pray to have it accomplished before I get to the end of the day. When I had a long to-do list and I wrote it over and over again, I never really felt guilty. But when I have to write over again, my one thing, it really makes me aware that I've got a problem, that I need help with my management of my time and the way things go in a busy day. A single candle illuminates a dark passage way very quickly. One light bulb … I want you to think about what a light bulb does to a room. It adds light to a room, but it's very diffused … it is spread throughout the room. On the other hand, if you look at a laser and you think about the power of laser light, it is so focused into one spot, maybe even a tiny spot, depending upon how that laser is carried. Just one spot, so bright that it can burn a hole through a wall. So, I'd like to have that kind of focus some days. I'd like to have that focus toward the cross. As I consider the laser-like prayer of Jesus in His time of need, being in anguish he prayed more earnestly. Listen to those words out of Luke 22:44. Being in anguish, he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground.

 

·         Luke 22:44: And being in anguish, He prayed more earnestly. And His sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground” (MEV).

 

I don't know about you, but that sounds like laser-focused. He was facing what you would be a painful death, but an experience that he could not avoid for any reason. That's a lot better than my general light prayer of O Lord, bless me, bless me, bless me. There's a lot more depth to that laser-like focus. And that's really what we want to be as leaders, to find that place where we help others find their focus. We help others find their way. I've got a guest for you today that may really excite you. I know I'm excited about it. I'm honored to welcome to the podcast, Carly Fiorina. You know her. She ran for president and had a great run. I just grew a respect for her. I see more as a Fortune 50 CEO. She ran HP, Hewlett Packard, had a great career there. Now I get to talk with her about a book that's going to release later spring, right around April 9. The name of the book is Find Your Way: Unleash Your Power and Highest Potential. If that is not the goal of a leader, if that's not my legacy, to point to the people who are better because of our skills, because that we've been in their life, then I don't know what it is. We're going to speak to a seasoned professional, an absolute professional in any way you use the word. So, let me introduce and welcome Carly Fiorina.

 

Carly Fiorina: Thank you so much. It's really a pleasure to be with you. And thank you for your opening comments. I learned a lot listening to you.

 

Carly Fiorina Books

 

·         Find Your Way: Unleash Your Power and Highest Potential

·         Rising to the Challenge: My Leadership Journey

·         Tough Choices: A Memoir

·         Carly Fiorina: Everything There is to Know About Carly Fiorina

·         Backfire: Carly Fiorina’s High-Stakes Battle for the Soul of Hewlett-Packard by Peter Burrows

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Well, thank you, ma'am. I know we're going to learn from you. So, I'm gonna pull my chair up to your feet and be taught by a Fortune 50. I've played in the big leagues up in major markets and I've enjoyed it. But I'm in a place now where I get to speak with people all over the world about their Christianity and leadership as Christians. You came to a place where most of your career has been focused on building leadership and problem solving. Tell me how you arrived at that great need that you see in our country and in corporate America?

 

·         Subscribe to Carly Fiorina’s podcast, By Example

 

Carly Fiorina: Let me answer that question in a bit of a roundabout way. Let me start by saying that in your opening comments, you were referencing one of the greatest leaders the world has ever known, Jesus. What Jesus did not have was position or title or power in the traditional sense of the word. He was humble, always; empathetic, always. Of course, He had enormous courage., He had great character, but He didn't have the trappings that we normally associate with leadership. I start there because I think people hear the word leader … or we throw the label leader on someone. What we tend to mean or to see is oh, somebody who has position, somebody who has a title, somebody who's the CEO or the president, or they're a big, famous person, or they have a lot of money and therefore they are a leader. The truth is, as we should be reminded by reading the Bible, and as I hope people will learn again, when they read Find Your Way, in reality, leadership has nothing to do with those things. Leaders focus on changing the order of things for the better, which means that leaders have to focus on the problems that are right in front of them; which means that leaders need not just to focus on making real progress on the problems that are all around them, changing the order of things for the better, but they also need to focus on the people around them, who can help them make progress. What does all that have to do with me? Just this. When I started my business career, I was a secretary. I was a law school dropout. I was at the very bottom of the totem pole. I didn't think of myself as a leader, and I didn't have a plan to become a CEO. But what I did was I saw problems all around me that had been left to fester and I saw people all around me who actually knew what could make it better. So together, we solved problems and we achieved results. People took notice. Then I learned that I enjoyed a challenge. I loved the process of identifying a problem and focusing people's energies on it and working together, pulling together to make progress against that. By the time I got to be a CEO, I realized that it was not my title or my office that made me a leader. Instead, it was my ability to see the possibilities and the circumstances and the people all around me and to focus their energies and mine on the things that we could make better.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: One of the things I appreciated about your book and that attracted me is that you're focused on internal leadership traits. We like to think of leadership is being something you can see, something you can point to and watch that later on. I have watched you on a platform, you're good, and you're eloquent and you have something to say and you speak well. But you also have these traits called humility and empathy. You had to have that to rise from the position you had, what we would call positional leadership, our Barney Fife position. You rose from that into CEO of Hewlett Packard. This is not a minor thing to accomplish. This is a big deal. What would you attribute that to more than anything else as a leader?

 

Carly Fiorina: First, I would say that I call them the disciplines of leadership. To your point, the essential foundational disciplines of leadership are all about our personal behavior. They're not about what we tell someone else to do. They're about our personal behavior, our choices. So, courage is a personal choice. It's a behavior; character, having character when the going gets tough; telling the truth when it would be easier to fudge. Character is about what you choose for yourself, what you choose to show others about what's inside yourself. If you're going to collaborate effectively with other people, which all effective leaders need to do, then you have to be humble enough to know you can't do it by yourself and empathetic enough to see what they could bring to the table to actually recognize their value instead of getting hung up by their appearance or their circumstances; or the fact that maybe they're not in the same tribe that you think you're in. Now, it is also true that there are tools that I've used, in fact they are in the book, Find Your Way, the tools that I've used to help translate some of the purpose of leadership into the results of leadership. So, it's not just about our internal compass and our foundational values and our behavior. It is also about the skill that we learn. But you can't become a leader unless the foundation is strong as we know from the Bible. A house built on sand will fall. A house built on stone will stand. It's true of leadership as well. The two things that I learned from the very beginning that have served me always is number one, the power of a question. And number two, the power of an honest conversation. So, the power of a question … when I started out, I didn't know anything. So, I asked questions all the time. But what I learned was that the more questions I asked, the more I learned. The more questions I asked, the easier it was to engage with other people. The more questions I asked, the more I understood what they brought to the table and what we really should focus our energies on. The power of an honest conversation, I would just say there's so many situations where everyone's convinced that we're all on the same page and actually, none of us are on the same page. Or we're spending so much time arguing with each other that we never get to what's really going on. The ability to carve out a space for an honest conversation about where are we really, what are we really doing? What do we really need to do better? What's really getting in our way? What do we really want to achieve or establish as our goal? The power of a question; the power of an honest conversation

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Point to some of the personal behaviors that you consider critical to your success and your, if I may use the language, meteoric rise at HP. What are those personal behaviors other than telling people what to do or being a manager rather than leader, what are the things you did that differentiated you?

 

Carly Fiorina: Yes, a CEO has to make decisions, but I've spent very little of my career telling people what to do, because it doesn't work. For a long time, no one would listen to me anyway, that's just the truth. But I always believed that the first and most important quality of leadership is courage. I think there's a reason why courage is talked about over and over and over again in the Bible. For leaders, courage is essential, because the price of leadership is always criticism. If you're trying to change the order of things for the better, if you're trying to improve something, that means you're trying to change something. When you try and change something, a lot of people don't like it. So, they criticize. So, you have to learn to get through that. I came up in a time when there weren't people who looked like me. And so, they are silly stories, but I tell some of them in Find Your Way. But, my first client meeting was held in a strip club. I was terrified, terrified. It sounds like a little thing now. But at the time, I had to summon what felt like enormous courage to just show up to do my job. They didn't know how to deal with someone like me. So, I think courage is not the only quality or personal behavior that a leader has to have. But it is the first and foremost. Because without courage, you cannot challenge the status quo because you can't stand the criticism that's going to come your way.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, tell me about what you see in the country. I know you had a real strong effort as you ran for president and I hope you comment just a tad about that. But tell me what you saw, other than what we see every day, that this climate of distrust that is so prevalent in really, from the church to corporations, into our government, and it just seems to be splitting and growing at an increasing rate. What is there to do about it? What can you take away from what you’ve seen?

 

Carly Fiorina: Certainly, I agree with your assessment of how things are right now. I got into politics because I think we need more citizens, more problem solvers, more leaders in public service. What I've come to see over and over again, is that the political system is geared towards winning. In fact, George Washington warned us about that. In 1789, he said the trouble of politics and political parties is they will come to care only about winning. So, winning is not the same as problem solving. I think our culture lifts up and magnifies conflict and controversy and outrage. I think politics is a win-lose game. So, what we end up doing in so many settings, is we all retreat to our corners, we find our tribes, we build ourselves up by tearing others down. If you think about that win-loss mentality, it is exactly the opposite dynamic of true leadership and problem solving. A leader finds something to learn from everyone. A leader finds value in everyone or potential value. Again, go back to Scripture. Jesus didn't pick as his disciples society’s leaders, he picked strays and losers, what society would have called strays and losers. And yet he knew that they had potential for leadership. He saw their true character, not the trappings. But we don't do that when we go into our tribes. The dynamic of problem solving is always about win-win; how do we find some common ground here? How do we find a common goal? How do we find a worthy purpose that can bring us together? So honestly, what I'm focused on now is what I've been focused on my whole life, I hope, which is lifting up leaders wherever they are. We have a lot of problems and we're not going to solve them unless we have more leaders, which means people have to get out of their crouch, come away from their tribe and focus on common goals. But leadership, in whatever package it comes in, and it comes in all kinds of packages, leaders look different, but leadership is always the same. … leaders understand that they are the catalyst to change the order of things for the better.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That's good. I really liked something that I think all of our listeners who are not in a typical leadership position and maybe leading in their homes or leading in their churches, but will say something to the effect of I need a plan for moving forward and we go into a planning meeting. But you differentiate very clearly in your book between planning your life and having a path for your life. Would you talk with us about that?

 

Carly Fiorina: A lot of times, people, too many times I think, people think they need a plan for their life. And their plan includes things like I want to be making this much money at this time, I want to achieve this position. I want this kind of car. I need to be married by this time. But the problem is when you get really focused on a specific destination, then a couple things usually happen. One, you may not get to that destination, and then you're devastated. Or you may arrive at the destination and you may find out this isn't what I thought it was going to be. It doesn't lift me up. Or you may have done so many things to get to that specific destination that you've sold your soul along the way. Once you sell your soul, no one ever pays you back, no one can pay you back. I never had a plan to be a CEO. I didn't have a plan to run for president. I dropped out of law school. The only plan I ever had was to be a lawyer. That didn't work well. I dropped out of law school. But what I've learned is if you can stay on a path, a path of personal behavior, a path of seeing the possibilities in the people and the circumstances all around you; a path of looking to solve the problems, not just talk about them, but to actually work with others to solve the problems that are right in front of you … a path to change the order of things for the better. The things that are in your sphere, not some big abstract idea that’s 1,000 miles away from you, but something right in front of you. If you can stay on that path, opportunity will knock. Opportunity always knocks. And if you're on a path instead of a plan, when opportunity knocks, you can have the courage to walk through the door instead of saying oh no, I can't take that. That's off my plan. How many times have you seen people walk away from an incredible opportunity because it wasn't in the plan. And yet, it is what they should be doing.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Carly Fiorina, please visit cpnshows.com.

 

Connect with Carly Fiorina

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

·         Carlyfiorina.com

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Carly Fiorina

 

Humility, empathy and courage are characteristics to help you lead in your purpose. Former presidential candidate and former CEO of Hewlett-Packard Carly Fiorina believes we need more people to stand as leaders who will solve problems rather than focus on success and winning.

 

She shares from her new book, Find Your Way.

 

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: Paul was probably the first Christian leader to teach the concept of spiritual focus. We all talk about it a lot. We've learned to talk about focus a lot better since we've had technology. I think many of us think about focus more than we ever have because it's so easy to chase shiny objects now. I've got one in my hand. It's so easy to lose focus. But I want you to notice what Paul had to say in the middle of Philippians chapter 3 around 12 to 14. In the middle of verse 13 he says, I focus on this one thing, I can't tell you how many times I write my one thing down as I begin my day. And, I pray to have it accomplished before I get to the end of the day. When I had a long to-do list and I wrote it over and over again, I never really felt guilty. But when I have to write over again, my one thing, it really makes me aware that I've got a problem, that I need help with my management of my time and the way things go in a busy day. A single candle illuminates a dark passage way very quickly. One light bulb … I want you to think about what a light bulb does to a room. It adds light to a room, but it's very diffused … it is spread throughout the room. On the other hand, if you look at a laser and you think about the power of laser light, it is so focused into one spot, maybe even a tiny spot, depending upon how that laser is carried. Just one spot, so bright that it can burn a hole through a wall. So, I'd like to have that kind of focus some days. I'd like to have that focus toward the cross. As I consider the laser-like prayer of Jesus in His time of need, being in anguish he prayed more earnestly. Listen to those words out of Luke 22:44. Being in anguish, he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground.

 

·         Luke 22:44: And being in anguish, He prayed more earnestly. And His sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground” (MEV).

 

I don't know about you, but that sounds like laser-focused. He was facing what you would be a painful death, but an experience that he could not avoid for any reason. That's a lot better than my general light prayer of O Lord, bless me, bless me, bless me. There's a lot more depth to that laser-like focus. And that's really what we want to be as leaders, to find that place where we help others find their focus. We help others find their way. I've got a guest for you today that may really excite you. I know I'm excited about it. I'm honored to welcome to the podcast, Carly Fiorina. You know her. She ran for president and had a great run. I just grew a respect for her. I see more as a Fortune 50 CEO. She ran HP, Hewlett Packard, had a great career there. Now I get to talk with her about a book that's going to release later spring, right around April 9. The name of the book is Find Your Way: Unleash Your Power and Highest Potential. If that is not the goal of a leader, if that's not my legacy, to point to the people who are better because of our skills, because that we've been in their life, then I don't know what it is. We're going to speak to a seasoned professional, an absolute professional in any way you use the word. So, let me introduce and welcome Carly Fiorina.

 

Carly Fiorina: Thank you so much. It's really a pleasure to be with you. And thank you for your opening comments. I learned a lot listening to you.

 

Carly Fiorina Books

 

·         Find Your Way: Unleash Your Power and Highest Potential

·         Rising to the Challenge: My Leadership Journey

·         Tough Choices: A Memoir

·         Carly Fiorina: Everything There is to Know About Carly Fiorina

·         Backfire: Carly Fiorina’s High-Stakes Battle for the Soul of Hewlett-Packard by Peter Burrows

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Well, thank you, ma'am. I know we're going to learn from you. So, I'm gonna pull my chair up to your feet and be taught by a Fortune 50. I've played in the big leagues up in major markets and I've enjoyed it. But I'm in a place now where I get to speak with people all over the world about their Christianity and leadership as Christians. You came to a place where most of your career has been focused on building leadership and problem solving. Tell me how you arrived at that great need that you see in our country and in corporate America?

 

·         Subscribe to Carly Fiorina’s podcast, By Example

 

Carly Fiorina: Let me answer that question in a bit of a roundabout way. Let me start by saying that in your opening comments, you were referencing one of the greatest leaders the world has ever known, Jesus. What Jesus did not have was position or title or power in the traditional sense of the word. He was humble, always; empathetic, always. Of course, He had enormous courage., He had great character, but He didn't have the trappings that we normally associate with leadership. I start there because I think people hear the word leader … or we throw the label leader on someone. What we tend to mean or to see is oh, somebody who has position, somebody who has a title, somebody who's the CEO or the president, or they're a big, famous person, or they have a lot of money and therefore they are a leader. The truth is, as we should be reminded by reading the Bible, and as I hope people will learn again, when they read Find Your Way, in reality, leadership has nothing to do with those things. Leaders focus on changing the order of things for the better, which means that leaders have to focus on the problems that are right in front of them; which means that leaders need not just to focus on making real progress on the problems that are all around them, changing the order of things for the better, but they also need to focus on the people around them, who can help them make progress. What does all that have to do with me? Just this. When I started my business career, I was a secretary. I was a law school dropout. I was at the very bottom of the totem pole. I didn't think of myself as a leader, and I didn't have a plan to become a CEO. But what I did was I saw problems all around me that had been left to fester and I saw people all around me who actually knew what could make it better. So together, we solved problems and we achieved results. People took notice. Then I learned that I enjoyed a challenge. I loved the process of identifying a problem and focusing people's energies on it and working together, pulling together to make progress against that. By the time I got to be a CEO, I realized that it was not my title or my office that made me a leader. Instead, it was my ability to see the possibilities and the circumstances and the people all around me and to focus their energies and mine on the things that we could make better.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: One of the things I appreciated about your book and that attracted me is that you're focused on internal leadership traits. We like to think of leadership is being something you can see, something you can point to and watch that later on. I have watched you on a platform, you're good, and you're eloquent and you have something to say and you speak well. But you also have these traits called humility and empathy. You had to have that to rise from the position you had, what we would call positional leadership, our Barney Fife position. You rose from that into CEO of Hewlett Packard. This is not a minor thing to accomplish. This is a big deal. What would you attribute that to more than anything else as a leader?

 

Carly Fiorina: First, I would say that I call them the disciplines of leadership. To your point, the essential foundational disciplines of leadership are all about our personal behavior. They're not about what we tell someone else to do. They're about our personal behavior, our choices. So, courage is a personal choice. It's a behavior; character, having character when the going gets tough; telling the truth when it would be easier to fudge. Character is about what you choose for yourself, what you choose to show others about what's inside yourself. If you're going to collaborate effectively with other people, which all effective leaders need to do, then you have to be humble enough to know you can't do it by yourself and empathetic enough to see what they could bring to the table to actually recognize their value instead of getting hung up by their appearance or their circumstances; or the fact that maybe they're not in the same tribe that you think you're in. Now, it is also true that there are tools that I've used, in fact they are in the book, Find Your Way, the tools that I've used to help translate some of the purpose of leadership into the results of leadership. So, it's not just about our internal compass and our foundational values and our behavior. It is also about the skill that we learn. But you can't become a leader unless the foundation is strong as we know from the Bible. A house built on sand will fall. A house built on stone will stand. It's true of leadership as well. The two things that I learned from the very beginning that have served me always is number one, the power of a question. And number two, the power of an honest conversation. So, the power of a question … when I started out, I didn't know anything. So, I asked questions all the time. But what I learned was that the more questions I asked, the more I learned. The more questions I asked, the easier it was to engage with other people. The more questions I asked, the more I understood what they brought to the table and what we really should focus our energies on. The power of an honest conversation, I would just say there's so many situations where everyone's convinced that we're all on the same page and actually, none of us are on the same page. Or we're spending so much time arguing with each other that we never get to what's really going on. The ability to carve out a space for an honest conversation about where are we really, what are we really doing? What do we really need to do better? What's really getting in our way? What do we really want to achieve or establish as our goal? The power of a question; the power of an honest conversation

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Point to some of the personal behaviors that you consider critical to your success and your, if I may use the language, meteoric rise at HP. What are those personal behaviors other than telling people what to do or being a manager rather than leader, what are the things you did that differentiated you?

 

Carly Fiorina: Yes, a CEO has to make decisions, but I've spent very little of my career telling people what to do, because it doesn't work. For a long time, no one would listen to me anyway, that's just the truth. But I always believed that the first and most important quality of leadership is courage. I think there's a reason why courage is talked about over and over and over again in the Bible. For leaders, courage is essential, because the price of leadership is always criticism. If you're trying to change the order of things for the better, if you're trying to improve something, that means you're trying to change something. When you try and change something, a lot of people don't like it. So, they criticize. So, you have to learn to get through that. I came up in a time when there weren't people who looked like me. And so, they are silly stories, but I tell some of them in Find Your Way. But, my first client meeting was held in a strip club. I was terrified, terrified. It sounds like a little thing now. But at the time, I had to summon what felt like enormous courage to just show up to do my job. They didn't know how to deal with someone like me. So, I think courage is not the only quality or personal behavior that a leader has to have. But it is the first and foremost. Because without courage, you cannot challenge the status quo because you can't stand the criticism that's going to come your way.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, tell me about what you see in the country. I know you had a real strong effort as you ran for president and I hope you comment just a tad about that. But tell me what you saw, other than what we see every day, that this climate of distrust that is so prevalent in really, from the church to corporations, into our government, and it just seems to be splitting and growing at an increasing rate. What is there to do about it? What can you take away from what you’ve seen?

 

Carly Fiorina: Certainly, I agree with your assessment of how things are right now. I got into politics because I think we need more citizens, more problem solvers, more leaders in public service. What I've come to see over and over again, is that the political system is geared towards winning. In fact, George Washington warned us about that. In 1789, he said the trouble of politics and political parties is they will come to care only about winning. So, winning is not the same as problem solving. I think our culture lifts up and magnifies conflict and controversy and outrage. I think politics is a win-lose game. So, what we end up doing in so many settings, is we all retreat to our corners, we find our tribes, we build ourselves up by tearing others down. If you think about that win-loss mentality, it is exactly the opposite dynamic of true leadership and problem solving. A leader finds something to learn from everyone. A leader finds value in everyone or potential value. Again, go back to Scripture. Jesus didn't pick as his disciples society’s leaders, he picked strays and losers, what society would have called strays and losers. And yet he knew that they had potential for leadership. He saw their true character, not the trappings. But we don't do that when we go into our tribes. The dynamic of problem solving is always about win-win; how do we find some common ground here? How do we find a common goal? How do we find a worthy purpose that can bring us together? So honestly, what I'm focused on now is what I've been focused on my whole life, I hope, which is lifting up leaders wherever they are. We have a lot of problems and we're not going to solve them unless we have more leaders, which means people have to get out of their crouch, come away from their tribe and focus on common goals. But leadership, in whatever package it comes in, and it comes in all kinds of packages, leaders look different, but leadership is always the same. … leaders understand that they are the catalyst to change the order of things for the better.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That's good. I really liked something that I think all of our listeners who are not in a typical leadership position and maybe leading in their homes or leading in their churches, but will say something to the effect of I need a plan for moving forward and we go into a planning meeting. But you differentiate very clearly in your book between planning your life and having a path for your life. Would you talk with us about that?

 

Carly Fiorina: A lot of times, people, too many times I think, people think they need a plan for their life. And their plan includes things like I want to be making this much money at this time, I want to achieve this position. I want this kind of car. I need to be married by this time. But the problem is when you get really focused on a specific destination, then a couple things usually happen. One, you may not get to that destination, and then you're devastated. Or you may arrive at the destination and you may find out this isn't what I thought it was going to be. It doesn't lift me up. Or you may have done so many things to get to that specific destination that you've sold your soul along the way. Once you sell your soul, no one ever pays you back, no one can pay you back. I never had a plan to be a CEO. I didn't have a plan to run for president. I dropped out of law school. The only plan I ever had was to be a lawyer. That didn't work well. I dropped out of law school. But what I've learned is if you can stay on a path, a path of personal behavior, a path of seeing the possibilities in the people and the circumstances all around you; a path of looking to solve the problems, not just talk about them, but to actually work with others to solve the problems that are right in front of you … a path to change the order of things for the better. The things that are in your sphere, not some big abstract idea that’s 1,000 miles away from you, but something right in front of you. If you can stay on that path, opportunity will knock. Opportunity always knocks. And if you're on a path instead of a plan, when opportunity knocks, you can have the courage to walk through the door instead of saying oh no, I can't take that. That's off my plan. How many times have you seen people walk away from an incredible opportunity because it wasn't in the plan. And yet, it is what they should be doing.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Carly Fiorina, please visit cpnshows.com.

 

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Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

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