A Walking Disaster with Dr. Jamie D. Aten (Season 5, Ep. 35)

A Walking Disaster with Dr. Jamie D. Aten (Season 5, Ep. 35)

Dr. Jamie D. Aten, disaster psychologist and founder and executive director of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute (HDI) at Wheaton College, discusses what surviving Katrina and cancer taught him about faith and resilience. In Dr. Aten's book "A Walking Disaster" helps you find meaning in the suffering. Listen to hear more about how you can have the spiritual fortitude to walk victoriously through the storm.

29 Minutes • 2 months ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Dr. Jamie Aten

 

Dr. Jamie D. Aten, disaster psychologist and founder and executive director of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute (HDI) at Wheaton College, discusses what surviving Katrina and cancer taught him about faith and resilience.

Dr. Aten's book, A Walking Disaster, helps you find meaning in the suffering. Listen to hear more about how you can have the spiritual fortitude to walk victoriously through the storm.

For the entire interview with Dr. Jamie Aten, visit cpnshows.com.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: It seems in everything sports related, there's a big emphasis on personal strength. My trainer tells me I need a strong core to help develop my golf game. All I can say is, he hasn't seen my golf game. I haven't seen anything that will help it. No amount of planks or pushups or pullups will ever give me the kind of core strength I need to overcome those fiery darts and the junk that comes through spiritual attacks. I can't be strong in myself. As all of our human strength tends to atrophy, I know that it takes much more than spinach or Popeye arms to defeat the spiritual enemies that all of us battle. We must trust that the Lord is my strength to fight the battles that we all face every day. I know that where I'm weak, He’s strong. That doesn’t help me sometimes to just have that head knowledge that I'm weak and He will be strong and He will get me through this. I'm going to refer you to Psalm 18 just the very first part of that Psalm. It is God who arms me with strength. He uses the word arm; I like that. I can just see the big Popeye arm. It is God who arms me with strength. I know my source of strength. Osama said that with great confidence and with great encouragement for all of us. So, I'll tell you that it's no coincidence that we have as my guest today someone who knows a little bit about battles and victory and getting through some really tough times. In fact, we can't even call what he's been through tough times. We call them disasters, and I'm gonna let him tell you more about that. But where I normally would introduce a guest by his resume, by the books he's written, the refereed academic articles that I know he's written, that really doesn't describe Dr. Jamie Aten. Let me tell you some of the things he's been through. How about Hurricane Katrina, Rita, Gustaf, Irma, Harvey and Maria. I'm out of names, so he's been through all those. He's an H1N1 pandemic survivor, he’s been through the Ebola crisis of 2014. Let's just go to something even more personal. He is himself survived stage 4 cancer. We'll talk to him a little bit about that as well. He’s so good at it that he's got his advanced program. He's the founder and executive director of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute at Wheaton College in Illinois. He's a Wheaton College professor, but listen to this. He's been through so many disasters that he now leads a disaster institute. Think about that for a minute. I don't want to be that good. I don't want to be so experienced that they put me in charge of a disaster relief center because I've lived through it. I say that tongue in cheek, but here's a man who knows God up close and personal in many ways that most of us don't really want to be tested.

Let's not forget your book because that's the main reason we want to talk to you. You had a new release, a new book come out in January. It's called A Walking Disaster. I think that fully well describes you; a walking disaster overcomer. Here's the subtitle: What Katrina and Cancer Taught Me About Faith and Resilience. That's a great book. I don't need to ask you what qualifies you to write that book. You lived it. What was your toughest battle? Let's just start off there.

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: Hurricane Katrina was incredibly overwhelming experience. My family and I had just moved down to South Mississippi six days before Katrina hit our community. But it was going through stage 4 colon cancer at the age of 35 that was by far the scariest battle I think I faced. I feel incredibly grateful. It's now been four and a half years with no evidence of disease since then. So, welcome those prayers.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, in Southern Mississippi. Were you teaching in Hattiesburg?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: That was actually my very first teaching position straight out of graduate school. I had just finished my doctorate and packed up my family from the Chicago area. My wife and daughter and I, we moved in. Less than a week later, the storm hits our community.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Those are hard days, particularly as a young man with a family. Let's talk about your strengths. What got you through Katrina?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: Going through Katrina, one of the things that really helped me during that was seeing the way that the local church responded and also to be able to witness he faith of others that helped them to be able to live resiliently through that difficult time. When it came to my own cancer experience, that strength again came from God's blessing of the community around me. That helped me and my family through that time, as well as learning to rely even more closely on Christ for strength.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: How much later was that in your life from after you've gone through Katrina and a couple other hurricanes? When were you diagnosed?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: I would have been diagnosed about eight years after Katrina.

 

What They’re Saying About A Walking Disaster

·         “Offers practical suggestions that can equip all of us to prepare for our personal trials.” – Phillip Yancey, author of Where is God When it Hurts?

·         “I couldn’t put this book down … a powerful model of the redemptive meaning the Christian faith brings to even the worst of disasters.” – M. Elizabeth Lewis Hall, PhD, professor, Rosemead School of Psychology

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, you're practicing between Katrina and cancer, weren’t you? You had some more little events you went through.

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: The other thing too is after Katrina, and then with Gustaf that was threatening the area, I started doing research along the southeast with all the different disasters that was happening there and working with churches and doing trainings and then started doing work internationally like in the Democratic Republic of Congo around gender-based violence and trauma. So, I've been researching a lot of these things. Then when cancer hit, I was experienced in my own personal disaster and seeing these things lived out.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, when did you decide to start up a Humanitarian Disaster Institute? What does somebody do to get qualified to do that?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: A lot of it came from very on-the-ground learning of spending so much of my time working on disasters for the last 14 years of my career. The idea and the vision for it really came shortly after Katrina. I was over in Biloxi. Here in our offices I've got this large picture up on the wall of one of the churches there where the cars are just piled up front. I remember looking over and seeing that church and the debris everywhere and just really realizing that many churches weren't prepared for how to respond. I felt like there needed to be a place that churches and Christians could go to for trusted resources to help them navigate such massive disasters. I was fortunate enough about what would have been six years later to come to Wheaton College in the Chicago area and start the Humanitarian Disaster Institute, making it the first faith-based academic disaster research center in the country. We also just went through that polar vortex where it got down to wind chill of negative 50 last week.

 

·         Jeremiah 17:8: For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and that spreads out its roots by the river, and shall not fear when heat comes, but its leaf shall be green, and it shall not be anxious in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit” (MEV).

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So how has the Lord taught you? Do you have a couple of verses or something that the Lord gave you this remained with you for your entire life?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: One of the things that really stood out to me during that time and really became my verse and the verse of my family through our year-long battle with cancer was Jeremiah 17:8, where we see the writer talking about how God still allows us to be able to bear fruit even during times of drought. That was really important to me. During this time, there were sometimes days if not weeks where I had very little energy, but still trying to think on a daily basis of what are some ways that God can still work through me for the betterment of others. Another big lesson for me was learning to accept help from others and to rely on the strength of the community that God had placed around me. That really hard for me because, not just my professional career but even my identity was has largely been wrapped up in being the helper; that if something bad happens that I'm one of the people that goes in and helps. It was it was hard to make that shift to be the helpee.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: But you become so much better, knowledgeable, understanding, empathetic because you went through it and had people help you now you can help people in a way that maybe you couldn't have without receiving it.

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: I think you're right. Because before, I don't think I really understood that we can let our pain either divide us or unite us. It was going through those experiences and those moments of vulnerability is where I learned that oftentimes we connect the most closely with others.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Dr. Jamie Aten, please visit cpnshows.com.

Connect with Jamie Aten

·         Jamieaten.com

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Dr. Jamie Aten

 

Dr. Jamie D. Aten, disaster psychologist and founder and executive director of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute (HDI) at Wheaton College, discusses what surviving Katrina and cancer taught him about faith and resilience.

Dr. Aten's book, A Walking Disaster, helps you find meaning in the suffering. Listen to hear more about how you can have the spiritual fortitude to walk victoriously through the storm.

For the entire interview with Dr. Jamie Aten, visit cpnshows.com.

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: It seems in everything sports related, there's a big emphasis on personal strength. My trainer tells me I need a strong core to help develop my golf game. All I can say is, he hasn't seen my golf game. I haven't seen anything that will help it. No amount of planks or pushups or pullups will ever give me the kind of core strength I need to overcome those fiery darts and the junk that comes through spiritual attacks. I can't be strong in myself. As all of our human strength tends to atrophy, I know that it takes much more than spinach or Popeye arms to defeat the spiritual enemies that all of us battle. We must trust that the Lord is my strength to fight the battles that we all face every day. I know that where I'm weak, He’s strong. That doesn’t help me sometimes to just have that head knowledge that I'm weak and He will be strong and He will get me through this. I'm going to refer you to Psalm 18 just the very first part of that Psalm. It is God who arms me with strength. He uses the word arm; I like that. I can just see the big Popeye arm. It is God who arms me with strength. I know my source of strength. Osama said that with great confidence and with great encouragement for all of us. So, I'll tell you that it's no coincidence that we have as my guest today someone who knows a little bit about battles and victory and getting through some really tough times. In fact, we can't even call what he's been through tough times. We call them disasters, and I'm gonna let him tell you more about that. But where I normally would introduce a guest by his resume, by the books he's written, the refereed academic articles that I know he's written, that really doesn't describe Dr. Jamie Aten. Let me tell you some of the things he's been through. How about Hurricane Katrina, Rita, Gustaf, Irma, Harvey and Maria. I'm out of names, so he's been through all those. He's an H1N1 pandemic survivor, he’s been through the Ebola crisis of 2014. Let's just go to something even more personal. He is himself survived stage 4 cancer. We'll talk to him a little bit about that as well. He’s so good at it that he's got his advanced program. He's the founder and executive director of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute at Wheaton College in Illinois. He's a Wheaton College professor, but listen to this. He's been through so many disasters that he now leads a disaster institute. Think about that for a minute. I don't want to be that good. I don't want to be so experienced that they put me in charge of a disaster relief center because I've lived through it. I say that tongue in cheek, but here's a man who knows God up close and personal in many ways that most of us don't really want to be tested.

Let's not forget your book because that's the main reason we want to talk to you. You had a new release, a new book come out in January. It's called A Walking Disaster. I think that fully well describes you; a walking disaster overcomer. Here's the subtitle: What Katrina and Cancer Taught Me About Faith and Resilience. That's a great book. I don't need to ask you what qualifies you to write that book. You lived it. What was your toughest battle? Let's just start off there.

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: Hurricane Katrina was incredibly overwhelming experience. My family and I had just moved down to South Mississippi six days before Katrina hit our community. But it was going through stage 4 colon cancer at the age of 35 that was by far the scariest battle I think I faced. I feel incredibly grateful. It's now been four and a half years with no evidence of disease since then. So, welcome those prayers.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, in Southern Mississippi. Were you teaching in Hattiesburg?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: That was actually my very first teaching position straight out of graduate school. I had just finished my doctorate and packed up my family from the Chicago area. My wife and daughter and I, we moved in. Less than a week later, the storm hits our community.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Those are hard days, particularly as a young man with a family. Let's talk about your strengths. What got you through Katrina?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: Going through Katrina, one of the things that really helped me during that was seeing the way that the local church responded and also to be able to witness he faith of others that helped them to be able to live resiliently through that difficult time. When it came to my own cancer experience, that strength again came from God's blessing of the community around me. That helped me and my family through that time, as well as learning to rely even more closely on Christ for strength.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: How much later was that in your life from after you've gone through Katrina and a couple other hurricanes? When were you diagnosed?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: I would have been diagnosed about eight years after Katrina.

 

What They’re Saying About A Walking Disaster

·         “Offers practical suggestions that can equip all of us to prepare for our personal trials.” – Phillip Yancey, author of Where is God When it Hurts?

·         “I couldn’t put this book down … a powerful model of the redemptive meaning the Christian faith brings to even the worst of disasters.” – M. Elizabeth Lewis Hall, PhD, professor, Rosemead School of Psychology

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, you're practicing between Katrina and cancer, weren’t you? You had some more little events you went through.

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: The other thing too is after Katrina, and then with Gustaf that was threatening the area, I started doing research along the southeast with all the different disasters that was happening there and working with churches and doing trainings and then started doing work internationally like in the Democratic Republic of Congo around gender-based violence and trauma. So, I've been researching a lot of these things. Then when cancer hit, I was experienced in my own personal disaster and seeing these things lived out.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, when did you decide to start up a Humanitarian Disaster Institute? What does somebody do to get qualified to do that?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: A lot of it came from very on-the-ground learning of spending so much of my time working on disasters for the last 14 years of my career. The idea and the vision for it really came shortly after Katrina. I was over in Biloxi. Here in our offices I've got this large picture up on the wall of one of the churches there where the cars are just piled up front. I remember looking over and seeing that church and the debris everywhere and just really realizing that many churches weren't prepared for how to respond. I felt like there needed to be a place that churches and Christians could go to for trusted resources to help them navigate such massive disasters. I was fortunate enough about what would have been six years later to come to Wheaton College in the Chicago area and start the Humanitarian Disaster Institute, making it the first faith-based academic disaster research center in the country. We also just went through that polar vortex where it got down to wind chill of negative 50 last week.

 

·         Jeremiah 17:8: For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and that spreads out its roots by the river, and shall not fear when heat comes, but its leaf shall be green, and it shall not be anxious in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit” (MEV).

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So how has the Lord taught you? Do you have a couple of verses or something that the Lord gave you this remained with you for your entire life?

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: One of the things that really stood out to me during that time and really became my verse and the verse of my family through our year-long battle with cancer was Jeremiah 17:8, where we see the writer talking about how God still allows us to be able to bear fruit even during times of drought. That was really important to me. During this time, there were sometimes days if not weeks where I had very little energy, but still trying to think on a daily basis of what are some ways that God can still work through me for the betterment of others. Another big lesson for me was learning to accept help from others and to rely on the strength of the community that God had placed around me. That really hard for me because, not just my professional career but even my identity was has largely been wrapped up in being the helper; that if something bad happens that I'm one of the people that goes in and helps. It was it was hard to make that shift to be the helpee.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: But you become so much better, knowledgeable, understanding, empathetic because you went through it and had people help you now you can help people in a way that maybe you couldn't have without receiving it.

 

Dr. Jamie Aten: I think you're right. Because before, I don't think I really understood that we can let our pain either divide us or unite us. It was going through those experiences and those moments of vulnerability is where I learned that oftentimes we connect the most closely with others.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Dr. Jamie Aten, please visit cpnshows.com.

Connect with Jamie Aten

·         Jamieaten.com

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

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A Walking Disaster with Dr. Jamie D. Aten (Season 5, Ep. 35)