Created to Thrive with Matt Tommey (Season 5, Ep. 45)

Created to Thrive with Matt Tommey (Season 5, Ep. 45)

You are created to thrive in an abundance of creativity. Artist Matt Tommey shares how to identify yourself in Christ and align your heart with this knowledge, then God will open the doors. He wants you to learn that what makes you really unique is what God wants to amplify. Listen to hear more and where you can find Matt's book "Created to Thrive."

21 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Dr. Randy Ross

 

The best relationships require intentional investment. Dr. Randy Ross, the founder and CEO of Remarkable!, provides four principles to cultivate unity and healthy relationships.

 

Listen to find out how you can apply these four principles in business and in the home from his new book Relationomics: Business Powered by Relationships. Become the change agent who speaks truth into your relationships.

 

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: In Philippians 2, Paul says to the church, then make me truly happy by agreeing wholeheartedly with each other; loving one another and working together with one mind and purpose. Now, I can't imagine that Paul would have thought that that anyone could agree wholeheartedly with each other let alone the church at Philippi. But he said, make me happy and get along with each other. As a leader, Paul understood the importance of relationships. So much of his teaching centered around sustaining relationships. We could fill this podcast with lessons taught about unity and love for one another in the church. In the Gospel of John in chapter 13 he wrote, ‘your love for one another will prove to the world that you're my disciples.’ In other words, y'all get your relationships straight because in the world, they don't have that. But you will show your relationship with Me because you do. What a heavy concept, and how convicting is that? So obviously Jesus was a difference maker in establishing and maintaining relationships. Yet today, it seems that the very first wrinkle in a relationship, we're quick to dispose of it as if it never really mattered. Perhaps it's a condition of our heart. How have we devolved into a society overwhelmed by disposable relationships? Can you count years? How many relationships have we disposed of in the church? Who is out of your life now that once held a key position in your daily plan and appointment book? Who have you stopped talking to? Have you blocked a former friend on Facebook because of a little disagreement, or even a big disagreement? I believe godly relationships are one of the keys to the kingdom. We must be willing to die to self for the good of the call on our lives. When we disagree and a spat stirs up, our response must be much different from how the world handles this stuff. We must seek to restore and rebuild kingdom relationships My guest today has written an important and much-needed book titled Relationomics. We're kind of putting the business of economics together with relationships. It’s a marketplace book; it's a leadership book; it's a relationship book. It's a life-living book, Relationomics. While the book is written for marketplace leaders, I think I find value in it for everyone who wants to harness the power of relationships. That's part of the subtitle of the book. I believe that Dr. Randy Ross has a good word in season for us today. I'm thankful to have you on the show today. Dr. Ross, welcome.

 

So, right off the bat. Let's just dive in. What’s happened in our spiritual society to create this culture of disposable relationships?

 

·         Philippians 2:14-15: Do all things without murmuring and disputing, that you may be blameless and harmless, sons of God, without fault, in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, in which you shine as lights in the world” (MEV).

·         John 13:35: By this all men will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another” (MEV).

 

 

Dr. Randy Ross: I think that practicing the principles that lead to healthier relationships … often times we may assume that they're common sense. But the reality is they're not common practice. Organizations lack effectiveness. They lack unity which is the most powerful force for good on the planet when we are like-minded, as you were talking about from Scripture. But it's not that common, and I don't care whether you're in a corporate setting or if you're in church life, unfortunately there are a lot of things that cause us not to play well in the sandbox together.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: You lived that as a pastor for 10 years. You've got a lot that you can refer to and how these things work.

 

Dr. Randy Ross: The first several years of my career I was pastor in churches both in Texas and in Florida, and as distinctly as God called me into the pulpit, He called me into the marketplace. I believe the next great spiritual revival is going to take place in the marketplace because we spend so much of our lives there. But as we got involved in looking at organizational culture across the country, literally around the globe, we understood that the vast majority people don't really enjoy their jobs. There are low levels of engagement and all kinds of unhealthy organizational dynamics that cause people not to build healthy relationships.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Doc, I really miss quiet neighborhoods. I miss Mayberry. I miss walking down the street, drinking an ice-cold Cherry Coke and watching people go by. I think we started to denigrate at that point where we stopped having a neighborhood, where we stopped having a relationship with our neighbors. I have to tell you, I don't know my neighbors. I've been here five years and they don't want to be known. I can't start a conversation with him that goes past, hi, how are you? Is that endemic to our country?

 

Randy Ross Books

·         Remarkable: Maximizing Results Through Value Creation

·         Relationomics: Business Powered by Relationships

·         Roadmap to Remarkable!

 

 

Dr. Randy Ross: I think it is endemic to our society. We all know from scripture that we were designed and created to live in community. God himself as the Trinity lives in community and He created us to live in community with Him. But there's this idea that we unpack in the book, it's the self-help conundrum. If you walk into any bookstore across our country the largest section is self-help and there's this idea that we can do it on our own, that we can raise ourselves up by our bootstraps, that we can make something of ourselves. But the reality is we can't do that apart from healthy relationships because relationships catalyze growth. Here's the interesting part. We talked in the book about this philosophy called Luciferienism. It's actually a philosophy of life that emphasizes individuality and self-actualization; not in the sense that Abraham Maslow set forth, but this idea that that you can literally, through a focus on your own individual will and choice, you can become all that you're meant to be. Luciferienism is a lie. It's tracked all the way back to Genesis where Lucifer in the form of a serpent deceived Eve and Adam into believing that if they ate from the tree of the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil, that they would be able to become like God, as knowledgeable as God, apart from a relationship with God. So, this idea that we can reach our full potential, apart from community, is a fallacy. It's a lie. Yet we bought into it in subtle ways because our society has become more independently oriented, as opposed to becoming interdependent in relationships. We've moved into this arena where we're isolated and spend a lot of time, frankly, separating ourselves from relationships through poor relational hygiene. It's indicative because one of the things that I hear so many leaders say is it's lonely at the top. I don't care if you're a pastor or a CEO, if you believe it's lonely at the top, my encouragement to you is just simply this: You're doing it wrong. There's a better way to do it because it's never meant to be lonely in life.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: It's time to find another job too. When I hear that, I tend to tell people to move on because they're burnt out or something, something's happened. It can happen, no question about it. But you wrote about four principles. We've done a good job of identifying the problem. We’ve pointed to the mess on the floor, but cleaning it up is monumental. It begins with me, it begins with you, and a book like this to remind us of who we are supposed to be how and how we were made to be. You wrote four principles to cultivate health and relationships. Let's discuss those; roll those out for us.

 

Dr. Randy Ross: We broke the book down into four sections and each section sets forth one of those principles. The first principle is just the principle of intentionality. We have to be intentional about developing healthy relationships, just like an organization has to be intentional about cultivating its culture. The reality is, wherever people get together, you're going to have a culture. It's not a matter of whether or not you'll have one. The question really is, will that culture be by design, meaning you give it intentional thought, reflection; you're trying to make it better. Or, will that culture be by default, meaning that you’ve gotten buried in the needs and the activities in the business. One day you may lift your head and realize you don't like the culture this created. The same thing happens in relationships. If we're not intentional about having a plan for and building healthy relationships, and we all fall prone to drift. If you drift, you're very unlikely to wind up at the destination that you desire. So, we have to be intentional about creating healthy relationships. The second thing is simply the principle of humility. We see a lack of humility in so many organizations. But humility is just this ability to embrace our humanity and feel very comfortable in our own skin no matter how freckled with failure it may be. The problem with a lot of organizations is that there's an unhealthy sense of competition. There may be poor communication. One of the huge destroyers of a healthy culture and healthy relationships is simply unresolved conflict. We see that everywhere. But then there's also political posturing and pretense or self-promotion self-protection. So, all that has to be stripped away in order for us to get to the place of authenticity and transparency, which are indicative of humility. That's the second principle. The third principle is the principle of accountability. There's a lot of talk about accountability, but very few who practice it well. but accountability begins with this concept. We have to be able to receive feedback well, and not only receive feedback, but actually aggressively seek feedback. So, we talk in the book about the growth spiral, that if we receive feedback well, there's this opportunity to ascend the growth spiral to inspiration and unity. But if we don't receive feedback well, if we're unwilling to be held accountable, then we get defensive and that spiral cycles downward to destructive activity. So, accountability is a huge part. Then lastly, we talk about sustainability. This is the importance of leadership with love. We say that leadership must be about something beyond self-interest, greater than self-promotion, and more noble than self-service. In order for it to be sustainable. It has to be about others, and so our focus has to be on helping people grow to healthier, better relationships.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That's solid now as I heard that list, I think all four of them are difficult. It's not just one of the four that’s kind of tough that’s going to hold us back I believe each one really requires effort and, I think, a pretty good prayer life to go with it.

 

Dr. Randy Ross: Absolutely no doubt about that. It doesn't come easy, but it's certainly well worthwhile when you build healthy relationships.

 

·         Randy Ross on Fox News

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, let's go to that thought because so much of what's going on really affects the church and that affects all of us and affects our communities. How is your book Relationomics impact the church?

 

Dr. Randy Ross: I think the principles first are transcendent. So, it really doesn't matter whether you're talking about healthy relationships and in a corporate context when you're trying to craft a compelling culture, or if it's in a nonprofit organization, church life specifically, or if it's even in the home, your relationship with your wife and your kids or other people in the community. The principles themselves are transcendent. Being able to not only understand but apply the principles that we espouse in the book can lead to healthier, happy lives because we're more deeply and authentically connected with other people. Life is rich when we have other people in our lives that love us and know us deeply and unconditionally, but they're close enough to us that they want the best for us and they're willing to be bold in terms of speaking truth into our lives. One of the things that we describe as a remarkable culture is when people believe the best in one another. Therefore, they want the best for one another and they expect the best from one another. I think all three of those have to be in place. So, regardless of the organization, if we believe the best in one another, want the best for one another and expect the best from one another and that's a high-trust environment. It's a place where people are deeply connected. There's a sense of compassion. But also, there's this accountability that takes place. I think that's the foundation for healthy culture.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Dr. Randy Ross, please visit cpnshows.com.

Connect with Dr. Randy Ross

·         Createremarkable.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

Episode Notes

Greenelines with

Dr. Steve Greene

Guest: Dr. Randy Ross

 

The best relationships require intentional investment. Dr. Randy Ross, the founder and CEO of Remarkable!, provides four principles to cultivate unity and healthy relationships.

 

Listen to find out how you can apply these four principles in business and in the home from his new book Relationomics: Business Powered by Relationships. Become the change agent who speaks truth into your relationships.

 

Introduction

Dr. Steve Greene: In Philippians 2, Paul says to the church, then make me truly happy by agreeing wholeheartedly with each other; loving one another and working together with one mind and purpose. Now, I can't imagine that Paul would have thought that that anyone could agree wholeheartedly with each other let alone the church at Philippi. But he said, make me happy and get along with each other. As a leader, Paul understood the importance of relationships. So much of his teaching centered around sustaining relationships. We could fill this podcast with lessons taught about unity and love for one another in the church. In the Gospel of John in chapter 13 he wrote, ‘your love for one another will prove to the world that you're my disciples.’ In other words, y'all get your relationships straight because in the world, they don't have that. But you will show your relationship with Me because you do. What a heavy concept, and how convicting is that? So obviously Jesus was a difference maker in establishing and maintaining relationships. Yet today, it seems that the very first wrinkle in a relationship, we're quick to dispose of it as if it never really mattered. Perhaps it's a condition of our heart. How have we devolved into a society overwhelmed by disposable relationships? Can you count years? How many relationships have we disposed of in the church? Who is out of your life now that once held a key position in your daily plan and appointment book? Who have you stopped talking to? Have you blocked a former friend on Facebook because of a little disagreement, or even a big disagreement? I believe godly relationships are one of the keys to the kingdom. We must be willing to die to self for the good of the call on our lives. When we disagree and a spat stirs up, our response must be much different from how the world handles this stuff. We must seek to restore and rebuild kingdom relationships My guest today has written an important and much-needed book titled Relationomics. We're kind of putting the business of economics together with relationships. It’s a marketplace book; it's a leadership book; it's a relationship book. It's a life-living book, Relationomics. While the book is written for marketplace leaders, I think I find value in it for everyone who wants to harness the power of relationships. That's part of the subtitle of the book. I believe that Dr. Randy Ross has a good word in season for us today. I'm thankful to have you on the show today. Dr. Ross, welcome.

 

So, right off the bat. Let's just dive in. What’s happened in our spiritual society to create this culture of disposable relationships?

 

·         Philippians 2:14-15: Do all things without murmuring and disputing, that you may be blameless and harmless, sons of God, without fault, in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, in which you shine as lights in the world” (MEV).

·         John 13:35: By this all men will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another” (MEV).

 

 

Dr. Randy Ross: I think that practicing the principles that lead to healthier relationships … often times we may assume that they're common sense. But the reality is they're not common practice. Organizations lack effectiveness. They lack unity which is the most powerful force for good on the planet when we are like-minded, as you were talking about from Scripture. But it's not that common, and I don't care whether you're in a corporate setting or if you're in church life, unfortunately there are a lot of things that cause us not to play well in the sandbox together.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: You lived that as a pastor for 10 years. You've got a lot that you can refer to and how these things work.

 

Dr. Randy Ross: The first several years of my career I was pastor in churches both in Texas and in Florida, and as distinctly as God called me into the pulpit, He called me into the marketplace. I believe the next great spiritual revival is going to take place in the marketplace because we spend so much of our lives there. But as we got involved in looking at organizational culture across the country, literally around the globe, we understood that the vast majority people don't really enjoy their jobs. There are low levels of engagement and all kinds of unhealthy organizational dynamics that cause people not to build healthy relationships.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Doc, I really miss quiet neighborhoods. I miss Mayberry. I miss walking down the street, drinking an ice-cold Cherry Coke and watching people go by. I think we started to denigrate at that point where we stopped having a neighborhood, where we stopped having a relationship with our neighbors. I have to tell you, I don't know my neighbors. I've been here five years and they don't want to be known. I can't start a conversation with him that goes past, hi, how are you? Is that endemic to our country?

 

Randy Ross Books

·         Remarkable: Maximizing Results Through Value Creation

·         Relationomics: Business Powered by Relationships

·         Roadmap to Remarkable!

 

 

Dr. Randy Ross: I think it is endemic to our society. We all know from scripture that we were designed and created to live in community. God himself as the Trinity lives in community and He created us to live in community with Him. But there's this idea that we unpack in the book, it's the self-help conundrum. If you walk into any bookstore across our country the largest section is self-help and there's this idea that we can do it on our own, that we can raise ourselves up by our bootstraps, that we can make something of ourselves. But the reality is we can't do that apart from healthy relationships because relationships catalyze growth. Here's the interesting part. We talked in the book about this philosophy called Luciferienism. It's actually a philosophy of life that emphasizes individuality and self-actualization; not in the sense that Abraham Maslow set forth, but this idea that that you can literally, through a focus on your own individual will and choice, you can become all that you're meant to be. Luciferienism is a lie. It's tracked all the way back to Genesis where Lucifer in the form of a serpent deceived Eve and Adam into believing that if they ate from the tree of the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil, that they would be able to become like God, as knowledgeable as God, apart from a relationship with God. So, this idea that we can reach our full potential, apart from community, is a fallacy. It's a lie. Yet we bought into it in subtle ways because our society has become more independently oriented, as opposed to becoming interdependent in relationships. We've moved into this arena where we're isolated and spend a lot of time, frankly, separating ourselves from relationships through poor relational hygiene. It's indicative because one of the things that I hear so many leaders say is it's lonely at the top. I don't care if you're a pastor or a CEO, if you believe it's lonely at the top, my encouragement to you is just simply this: You're doing it wrong. There's a better way to do it because it's never meant to be lonely in life.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: It's time to find another job too. When I hear that, I tend to tell people to move on because they're burnt out or something, something's happened. It can happen, no question about it. But you wrote about four principles. We've done a good job of identifying the problem. We’ve pointed to the mess on the floor, but cleaning it up is monumental. It begins with me, it begins with you, and a book like this to remind us of who we are supposed to be how and how we were made to be. You wrote four principles to cultivate health and relationships. Let's discuss those; roll those out for us.

 

Dr. Randy Ross: We broke the book down into four sections and each section sets forth one of those principles. The first principle is just the principle of intentionality. We have to be intentional about developing healthy relationships, just like an organization has to be intentional about cultivating its culture. The reality is, wherever people get together, you're going to have a culture. It's not a matter of whether or not you'll have one. The question really is, will that culture be by design, meaning you give it intentional thought, reflection; you're trying to make it better. Or, will that culture be by default, meaning that you’ve gotten buried in the needs and the activities in the business. One day you may lift your head and realize you don't like the culture this created. The same thing happens in relationships. If we're not intentional about having a plan for and building healthy relationships, and we all fall prone to drift. If you drift, you're very unlikely to wind up at the destination that you desire. So, we have to be intentional about creating healthy relationships. The second thing is simply the principle of humility. We see a lack of humility in so many organizations. But humility is just this ability to embrace our humanity and feel very comfortable in our own skin no matter how freckled with failure it may be. The problem with a lot of organizations is that there's an unhealthy sense of competition. There may be poor communication. One of the huge destroyers of a healthy culture and healthy relationships is simply unresolved conflict. We see that everywhere. But then there's also political posturing and pretense or self-promotion self-protection. So, all that has to be stripped away in order for us to get to the place of authenticity and transparency, which are indicative of humility. That's the second principle. The third principle is the principle of accountability. There's a lot of talk about accountability, but very few who practice it well. but accountability begins with this concept. We have to be able to receive feedback well, and not only receive feedback, but actually aggressively seek feedback. So, we talk in the book about the growth spiral, that if we receive feedback well, there's this opportunity to ascend the growth spiral to inspiration and unity. But if we don't receive feedback well, if we're unwilling to be held accountable, then we get defensive and that spiral cycles downward to destructive activity. So, accountability is a huge part. Then lastly, we talk about sustainability. This is the importance of leadership with love. We say that leadership must be about something beyond self-interest, greater than self-promotion, and more noble than self-service. In order for it to be sustainable. It has to be about others, and so our focus has to be on helping people grow to healthier, better relationships.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: That's solid now as I heard that list, I think all four of them are difficult. It's not just one of the four that’s kind of tough that’s going to hold us back I believe each one really requires effort and, I think, a pretty good prayer life to go with it.

 

Dr. Randy Ross: Absolutely no doubt about that. It doesn't come easy, but it's certainly well worthwhile when you build healthy relationships.

 

·         Randy Ross on Fox News

 

Dr. Steve Greene: So, let's go to that thought because so much of what's going on really affects the church and that affects all of us and affects our communities. How is your book Relationomics impact the church?

 

Dr. Randy Ross: I think the principles first are transcendent. So, it really doesn't matter whether you're talking about healthy relationships and in a corporate context when you're trying to craft a compelling culture, or if it's in a nonprofit organization, church life specifically, or if it's even in the home, your relationship with your wife and your kids or other people in the community. The principles themselves are transcendent. Being able to not only understand but apply the principles that we espouse in the book can lead to healthier, happy lives because we're more deeply and authentically connected with other people. Life is rich when we have other people in our lives that love us and know us deeply and unconditionally, but they're close enough to us that they want the best for us and they're willing to be bold in terms of speaking truth into our lives. One of the things that we describe as a remarkable culture is when people believe the best in one another. Therefore, they want the best for one another and they expect the best from one another. I think all three of those have to be in place. So, regardless of the organization, if we believe the best in one another, want the best for one another and expect the best from one another and that's a high-trust environment. It's a place where people are deeply connected. There's a sense of compassion. But also, there's this accountability that takes place. I think that's the foundation for healthy culture.

 

For the rest of Dr. Greene’s interview with Dr. Randy Ross, please visit cpnshows.com.

Connect with Dr. Randy Ross

·         Createremarkable.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

 

Greenelines Host Information

Dr. Steve Greene is the Publisher and Executive Vice President of Charisma Media. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in marketing from Memphis State University. He has worked in television station management and worked directly with over 80 stations throughout the United States. He has worked in marketing capacities with McDonald’s, Jiffy Lube, and Stanley Steemer. He has owned restaurants, a national advertising agency and a syndicated marketing research firm. Dr. Greene has served as the Dean of the College of Business and professor of marketing at Oral Roberts University. He is also the author of Love Leads, which dispels the myths and misconceptions many have come to accept about leadership.

To learn more about Dr. Steve Greene, connect with him on social media!

Facebook: https://facebook.com/drsgreene/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrSteveGreene

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.stevegreene/

 

email: greenelines@charismamedia.com

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Created to Thrive with Matt Tommey (Season 5, Ep. 45)