Janet Porter Tells Story Behind Success of Heartbeat Bills

Janet Porter Tells Story Behind Success of Heartbeat Bills

If there is a heartbeat, there is life. Janet Porter, founder and president of Faith2Action, goes in-depth on the Heartbeat Bill and how it was crafted to be the arrow in the heart of Roe vs. Wade. Listen as she tells the story of little Haley whose beating heart in the womb changed abortion laws in the state of Ohio.

40 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

In-Depth

With Stephen Strang

Guest: Janet Porter

If there is a heartbeat, there is life. Janet Porter, founder and president of Faith2Action, goes in-depth on the Heartbeat Bill and how it was crafted to be the arrow in the heart of Roe vs. Wade. Listen as she tells the story of little Haley whose beating heart in the womb changed abortion laws in the state of Ohio.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Since 1973, 60 million babies in America have been aborted. And while Christians have opposed it, it is mainly just to regulate it with not a lot of success, frankly. And now there's an effort to actually eliminate abortion in America. Today on In-Depth with Stephen Strang, I have the privilege of talking to Janet Porter, who I've known for a long time. She's very well-respected as an activist for Christian causes, particularly for the right to life. So, let me welcome you to the podcast, Janet and I want to talk to you about this heartbeat bill, which you have championed and is now being passed by several states. It's almost like some kind of tipping point is happening. So, I just want to ask you, if you could explain it to me and my listeners what's happening.

 

·         Read the Strang Report: How One Woman Started the Heartbeat Bill Movement Sweeping America

 

Janet Porter: Sure. So you mentioned that that we had been incrementally trying to regulate abortion, regulating around the edges of abortion. And honestly, I was a part of that effort because we thought that's all we could do. I lobbied hard for things like parental consent, the woman's right to know, 24-hour waiting period, fetal homicide. I even lobbied for the nation's first ban on partial-birth abortion. But at the end of the day, all the work we've done in the last 46 years, we've really just, like you mentioned, we've regulated abortion and there still are more than a million children who are aborted legally every year. I'll tell you something. That is not success, any way you want to measure it. When you've got a million casualties every year after four decades of fighting, that's not that's not success. So, if we want to have different results, we have to try a different approach. That's where the heartbeat bill comes in. It all started back in 2010. I was living in Florida. I had moved down there to run the Center for Reclaiming America with Dr. D. James Kennedy. I moved back to Ohio to be with family. And my husband, just nonchalantly one day in October 2010, said why don't you get involved in the pro-life movement? I certainly had a heart to bring the killing to an end. And he said, why don't you outlaw abortion while you're here? I just I just laughed at him. It just seemed too big. It just seemed impossible. But I also know the state of Ohio motto, it's my home state. It's the motto for the state and the motto for my life, and that is, with God, all things are possible.

Heartbeat Bill on Charisma

·         Are Millitant Abortionists Playing Right into Jezebel’s Hands?

·         Unborn Babies Can’t Carry Protest Signs

·         A Civil War is Coming Over Abortion, Thanks to Jezebel

·         Update: Ohio Gov Signs Abortion Bill That Ensures ‘If a Heartbeat’s Detected, the Baby’s Protected’

·         Georgia Governor Signs Heartbeat Abortion Ban into Law

·         Congressman Introduces Federal ‘Heartbeat Bill’

 

The bottom line, Steve, either that's true, or it's not true. I'm banking everything that I have that it's true, and I'm pretty confident that it is because Jesus was the one who said it. So, the next month, I went to a wake of a man who was a former boss back in the Right to Life days. His name is Mark Lally. I realized that he worked his whole life to try and end abortion and he never got to see what he worked for. Why? Because we've been regulating around the edges and that life is very short. I had just lost my father and something hit me. It was not quite a lightning bolt to my heart, but it was like something so strong that I need to do; that we need to finish this. We need to do it and we need to do it now. I turned to a friend and I said if we can't rescue every child just yet, let's get as many as we can. How about we protect from the time their hearts begin to beat? I pitched the idea right there at the wake. I assembled a team the next week of more than 20 attorneys from around the country to draft what has become known as the heartbeat bill. It is basically this. Here's the premise. If a heartbeat is detected, the baby's protected. It’s the same for any human being in any hospital around the world. If you found a body lying on the on the ground, what would you do? You wouldn't just plant a funeral. You would check for a pulse. Why? Because the heartbeat is the universally recognized indicator of life. Why should we ignore it when it comes to the very young? Why should we discriminate against children in the womb? What the heartbeat bill does is it doesn't get us all the way to the finish line of conception when our each of our lives begin. But it is a scientific step that gets us almost all the way there and protects every child whose heartbeat can be heard. So, to deny a heartbeat is to deny science. That's what we're finding with those who oppose it. They are really running from technology. To ignore that heartbeat is heartless. And that's really what what's happening. We're exposing where people are. The bottom line is we want to protect them from conception. The opposition wants to kill them even in the process of birth, as we've seen in New York. But we can at least all agree that once we've got a detectable heartbeat in a fellow human being, we should no longer ignore it and turn our backs on that SOS cry for help.

 

NPR Interview: Who is ‘Heartbeat Bill’ Author Janet Porter?

 

Stephen Strang: The thing that you mentioned about New York is just absolutely stunning. And maybe I was wrong, but I believe that even pro-abortion people … if a baby was born … like an abortion was not successful … even they accepted that the baby was a human being. Somehow, they seem to think that as the baby came through the birth canal, it turned from, what do they, say a blob of cells or something into a human being. But the governor of Virginia said that if a baby was born, to keep the baby comfortable, and then consult with the mother and the physician and decide whether or not to execute it, to use the word that President Trump used in the State of the Union. He commented on it right after this thing came out in the news. But it seems to me that you have come really come up with a brilliant strategy to protect and unborn because the word that was always used before, at least, in my opinion, was always viability, whatever that meant. When the baby was viable … but you've just pointed out that when baby has a heartbeat, even if it cannot survive outside the womb, which was another measure. … We all know preemie babies that were born couple of months early who ended up surviving. But how did you come up with the idea of heartbeat?

 

Watch: Heartbeat Bill, Capitol Hill Club

 

Janet Porter: Well, let me first comment on New York. I just want to make the comment. When we're talking about killing children in the process of birth, we have exposed what the enemy is really talking about, and that is not terminating a pregnancy. A birth terminates pregnancy. They're talking about guaranteeing a dead baby. That's what this is. It's an assault against human life, even after birth as we're seeing in Virginia. I think, quite honestly, the enemy has overplayed his hand. But that what we're looking at is a wake-up call to all those who've been sitting on the sidelines. Quite frankly, there are a number of states that do not have a gestational limit on abortions and when they can be done. But New York just came out and really, the people couldn’t believe it. I tell people you can have abortion for all nine months, and they wouldn't believe me. Believe this now because they're applauding that endeavor. It’s absolutely outrageous, and America is waking up. But how did the heartbeat bill come about? I had been a part of the of the personhood efforts. I had been in South Dakota. I was there and did a radio show there on seven South Dakota stations as well as my own show at the time. We went to set to South Dakota at Mount at Mount Rushmore where we had a rally with Dr. Dobson and Alan Keyes and so many others where we tried to protect them from conception. Personhood amendments, they haven’t succeeded just yet. So, that's where I said, look, it's like a burning building. You go in and you rescue as many children as you can, and you go back in and you carry out as many more as you can. So, heartbeat has always been just something … in fact, I remember decades ago, Mark Lally, the man whose wake I was at, I remember pitching him that idea back in … I never told anybody this, but back in the 80s, I said heartbeat Why don't we protect them from heartbeat? And they just said oh no, now's not the time and the courts are not ready, and all the excuses. I just said, you know what? I'm tired of listening to all the naysayers and all those who say it can't be done because we've tried and we failed. The original idea was why don't we go with heartbeat, brainwaves? How far back can we get with an incremental bill to protect these babies? Friends of mine said, yeah, I like heartbeat. I said, I do, too. Let's draft a heartbeat bill. And that's what we did. We then assembled not only a team to draft it, we then introduced it in Ohio with 50 of the 99 members of the House of Representatives as co-sponsors. So, we showed the world that we had the votes to pass it on top of the bill as people who put their name as co-sponsors. June 28 of that year was the first time the House passed a bill this protective and that was that was the first heartbeat bill in America. It’s just so simple.

Dr. Wilkie said it this way: If there's a heartbeat there's life. He said there's something about heartbeat. You can't imagine the amount of things we did pass this bill because it was being blocked, primarily in the Senate. But we rented out every chair they had at the statehouse. We had standing room only, an overflow outside. It was like on a Tuesday afternoon in September and Dr. Wilkie was there, among others. Lou Engle, Dutch Sheets; we had Jim Garlow, Rick Scarborough, a big group of people. But Dr. Wilkie played what he's done for many, many decades. He played the heartbeat of a six-week baby. He pressed the button on his little recorder, and you could hear that baby's heartbeat. And he said, everybody gets that. We know the heart monitors and hospitals are not there for decoration. None of us have ever been to a funeral of somebody with a beating heart. Why? Because we know a heartbeat is a sign of life. And that's what I believe is taken to the heart of America. We made it clear exactly what we're talking about.

In the early days, in 2011. we introduced a bill on Valentine's week, which I thought was a nice backdrop. We had 5,000 shiny, red heart balloons in the backdrop. We delivered those to the representatives. When it came time for the hearings. I said let's bring in the youngest to ever testify. We brought in several women who were pregnant. One was pregnant with nine-week-old baby Haley; a little baby girl that they had already named Haley. We put the ultrasound up to her abdomen and showed on the screen. And now the ultrasound is a lot better than they used to be. You could zoom in, you can see the heart pumping. It's turned red, and the pro-abortioners went wild. You can imagine. They were attacking me. Janet and her circus act and her antics and all the rest. And I said, just how sad is it that, to defend your position, you've got to you've got to deny science. You've got to run from technology. They brought in medical students. They all were their white lab coats even though they were freshmen. I just thought, you know, I can wear a lab coat too and get one at the Salvation Army. But you're not a doctor. They came in and it was just it was all a great big theater. But in this case, this baby's heartbeat, just the hearing … what we saw is that the cameras all zoomed in on that baby's ultrasound. Every time they talked about the bill, that was the image they used on the news. No matter what they were saying … well, the committee is going to be bringing it to a vote or there's a delay or whatever it is. They showed on the news that baby’s beating heart.

Just the publicity of that baby's heartbeat saved at least one life that I know of, for a fact. A woman came up to me and said her friend asked her to drive her to the to the abortion mill. She said once I found out about the heartbeat, I had to tell her no. She worked at the State House. About two weeks later, she came up to me and hugged me and said they cancelled the abortion appointment. The baby's going to live, and it was just so joyous. I saw her several months later and she showed me the picture on Facebook of what was once viewed as a terrible problem … something that would be life-changing and horrific. It turned out that this little baby, a little boy named Aidan, was now the biggest blessing of this young woman's life. And there was his smiling face on Facebook. I realized just the publicity of this bill, of this baby's heartbeat … It's like putting a bumper sticker or a the billboard across the state: Abortion stops a beating heart. But with this bill, a beating heart will stop abortion. That's the difference.

 

Connect with Janet Porter

·         At Faith 2 Action: f2a.org

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

·         On YouTube

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

Episode Notes

In-Depth

With Stephen Strang

Guest: Janet Porter

If there is a heartbeat, there is life. Janet Porter, founder and president of Faith2Action, goes in-depth on the Heartbeat Bill and how it was crafted to be the arrow in the heart of Roe vs. Wade. Listen as she tells the story of little Haley whose beating heart in the womb changed abortion laws in the state of Ohio.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Since 1973, 60 million babies in America have been aborted. And while Christians have opposed it, it is mainly just to regulate it with not a lot of success, frankly. And now there's an effort to actually eliminate abortion in America. Today on In-Depth with Stephen Strang, I have the privilege of talking to Janet Porter, who I've known for a long time. She's very well-respected as an activist for Christian causes, particularly for the right to life. So, let me welcome you to the podcast, Janet and I want to talk to you about this heartbeat bill, which you have championed and is now being passed by several states. It's almost like some kind of tipping point is happening. So, I just want to ask you, if you could explain it to me and my listeners what's happening.

 

·         Read the Strang Report: How One Woman Started the Heartbeat Bill Movement Sweeping America

 

Janet Porter: Sure. So you mentioned that that we had been incrementally trying to regulate abortion, regulating around the edges of abortion. And honestly, I was a part of that effort because we thought that's all we could do. I lobbied hard for things like parental consent, the woman's right to know, 24-hour waiting period, fetal homicide. I even lobbied for the nation's first ban on partial-birth abortion. But at the end of the day, all the work we've done in the last 46 years, we've really just, like you mentioned, we've regulated abortion and there still are more than a million children who are aborted legally every year. I'll tell you something. That is not success, any way you want to measure it. When you've got a million casualties every year after four decades of fighting, that's not that's not success. So, if we want to have different results, we have to try a different approach. That's where the heartbeat bill comes in. It all started back in 2010. I was living in Florida. I had moved down there to run the Center for Reclaiming America with Dr. D. James Kennedy. I moved back to Ohio to be with family. And my husband, just nonchalantly one day in October 2010, said why don't you get involved in the pro-life movement? I certainly had a heart to bring the killing to an end. And he said, why don't you outlaw abortion while you're here? I just I just laughed at him. It just seemed too big. It just seemed impossible. But I also know the state of Ohio motto, it's my home state. It's the motto for the state and the motto for my life, and that is, with God, all things are possible.

Heartbeat Bill on Charisma

·         Are Millitant Abortionists Playing Right into Jezebel’s Hands?

·         Unborn Babies Can’t Carry Protest Signs

·         A Civil War is Coming Over Abortion, Thanks to Jezebel

·         Update: Ohio Gov Signs Abortion Bill That Ensures ‘If a Heartbeat’s Detected, the Baby’s Protected’

·         Georgia Governor Signs Heartbeat Abortion Ban into Law

·         Congressman Introduces Federal ‘Heartbeat Bill’

 

The bottom line, Steve, either that's true, or it's not true. I'm banking everything that I have that it's true, and I'm pretty confident that it is because Jesus was the one who said it. So, the next month, I went to a wake of a man who was a former boss back in the Right to Life days. His name is Mark Lally. I realized that he worked his whole life to try and end abortion and he never got to see what he worked for. Why? Because we've been regulating around the edges and that life is very short. I had just lost my father and something hit me. It was not quite a lightning bolt to my heart, but it was like something so strong that I need to do; that we need to finish this. We need to do it and we need to do it now. I turned to a friend and I said if we can't rescue every child just yet, let's get as many as we can. How about we protect from the time their hearts begin to beat? I pitched the idea right there at the wake. I assembled a team the next week of more than 20 attorneys from around the country to draft what has become known as the heartbeat bill. It is basically this. Here's the premise. If a heartbeat is detected, the baby's protected. It’s the same for any human being in any hospital around the world. If you found a body lying on the on the ground, what would you do? You wouldn't just plant a funeral. You would check for a pulse. Why? Because the heartbeat is the universally recognized indicator of life. Why should we ignore it when it comes to the very young? Why should we discriminate against children in the womb? What the heartbeat bill does is it doesn't get us all the way to the finish line of conception when our each of our lives begin. But it is a scientific step that gets us almost all the way there and protects every child whose heartbeat can be heard. So, to deny a heartbeat is to deny science. That's what we're finding with those who oppose it. They are really running from technology. To ignore that heartbeat is heartless. And that's really what what's happening. We're exposing where people are. The bottom line is we want to protect them from conception. The opposition wants to kill them even in the process of birth, as we've seen in New York. But we can at least all agree that once we've got a detectable heartbeat in a fellow human being, we should no longer ignore it and turn our backs on that SOS cry for help.

 

NPR Interview: Who is ‘Heartbeat Bill’ Author Janet Porter?

 

Stephen Strang: The thing that you mentioned about New York is just absolutely stunning. And maybe I was wrong, but I believe that even pro-abortion people … if a baby was born … like an abortion was not successful … even they accepted that the baby was a human being. Somehow, they seem to think that as the baby came through the birth canal, it turned from, what do they, say a blob of cells or something into a human being. But the governor of Virginia said that if a baby was born, to keep the baby comfortable, and then consult with the mother and the physician and decide whether or not to execute it, to use the word that President Trump used in the State of the Union. He commented on it right after this thing came out in the news. But it seems to me that you have come really come up with a brilliant strategy to protect and unborn because the word that was always used before, at least, in my opinion, was always viability, whatever that meant. When the baby was viable … but you've just pointed out that when baby has a heartbeat, even if it cannot survive outside the womb, which was another measure. … We all know preemie babies that were born couple of months early who ended up surviving. But how did you come up with the idea of heartbeat?

 

Watch: Heartbeat Bill, Capitol Hill Club

 

Janet Porter: Well, let me first comment on New York. I just want to make the comment. When we're talking about killing children in the process of birth, we have exposed what the enemy is really talking about, and that is not terminating a pregnancy. A birth terminates pregnancy. They're talking about guaranteeing a dead baby. That's what this is. It's an assault against human life, even after birth as we're seeing in Virginia. I think, quite honestly, the enemy has overplayed his hand. But that what we're looking at is a wake-up call to all those who've been sitting on the sidelines. Quite frankly, there are a number of states that do not have a gestational limit on abortions and when they can be done. But New York just came out and really, the people couldn’t believe it. I tell people you can have abortion for all nine months, and they wouldn't believe me. Believe this now because they're applauding that endeavor. It’s absolutely outrageous, and America is waking up. But how did the heartbeat bill come about? I had been a part of the of the personhood efforts. I had been in South Dakota. I was there and did a radio show there on seven South Dakota stations as well as my own show at the time. We went to set to South Dakota at Mount at Mount Rushmore where we had a rally with Dr. Dobson and Alan Keyes and so many others where we tried to protect them from conception. Personhood amendments, they haven’t succeeded just yet. So, that's where I said, look, it's like a burning building. You go in and you rescue as many children as you can, and you go back in and you carry out as many more as you can. So, heartbeat has always been just something … in fact, I remember decades ago, Mark Lally, the man whose wake I was at, I remember pitching him that idea back in … I never told anybody this, but back in the 80s, I said heartbeat Why don't we protect them from heartbeat? And they just said oh no, now's not the time and the courts are not ready, and all the excuses. I just said, you know what? I'm tired of listening to all the naysayers and all those who say it can't be done because we've tried and we failed. The original idea was why don't we go with heartbeat, brainwaves? How far back can we get with an incremental bill to protect these babies? Friends of mine said, yeah, I like heartbeat. I said, I do, too. Let's draft a heartbeat bill. And that's what we did. We then assembled not only a team to draft it, we then introduced it in Ohio with 50 of the 99 members of the House of Representatives as co-sponsors. So, we showed the world that we had the votes to pass it on top of the bill as people who put their name as co-sponsors. June 28 of that year was the first time the House passed a bill this protective and that was that was the first heartbeat bill in America. It’s just so simple.

Dr. Wilkie said it this way: If there's a heartbeat there's life. He said there's something about heartbeat. You can't imagine the amount of things we did pass this bill because it was being blocked, primarily in the Senate. But we rented out every chair they had at the statehouse. We had standing room only, an overflow outside. It was like on a Tuesday afternoon in September and Dr. Wilkie was there, among others. Lou Engle, Dutch Sheets; we had Jim Garlow, Rick Scarborough, a big group of people. But Dr. Wilkie played what he's done for many, many decades. He played the heartbeat of a six-week baby. He pressed the button on his little recorder, and you could hear that baby's heartbeat. And he said, everybody gets that. We know the heart monitors and hospitals are not there for decoration. None of us have ever been to a funeral of somebody with a beating heart. Why? Because we know a heartbeat is a sign of life. And that's what I believe is taken to the heart of America. We made it clear exactly what we're talking about.

In the early days, in 2011. we introduced a bill on Valentine's week, which I thought was a nice backdrop. We had 5,000 shiny, red heart balloons in the backdrop. We delivered those to the representatives. When it came time for the hearings. I said let's bring in the youngest to ever testify. We brought in several women who were pregnant. One was pregnant with nine-week-old baby Haley; a little baby girl that they had already named Haley. We put the ultrasound up to her abdomen and showed on the screen. And now the ultrasound is a lot better than they used to be. You could zoom in, you can see the heart pumping. It's turned red, and the pro-abortioners went wild. You can imagine. They were attacking me. Janet and her circus act and her antics and all the rest. And I said, just how sad is it that, to defend your position, you've got to you've got to deny science. You've got to run from technology. They brought in medical students. They all were their white lab coats even though they were freshmen. I just thought, you know, I can wear a lab coat too and get one at the Salvation Army. But you're not a doctor. They came in and it was just it was all a great big theater. But in this case, this baby's heartbeat, just the hearing … what we saw is that the cameras all zoomed in on that baby's ultrasound. Every time they talked about the bill, that was the image they used on the news. No matter what they were saying … well, the committee is going to be bringing it to a vote or there's a delay or whatever it is. They showed on the news that baby’s beating heart.

Just the publicity of that baby's heartbeat saved at least one life that I know of, for a fact. A woman came up to me and said her friend asked her to drive her to the to the abortion mill. She said once I found out about the heartbeat, I had to tell her no. She worked at the State House. About two weeks later, she came up to me and hugged me and said they cancelled the abortion appointment. The baby's going to live, and it was just so joyous. I saw her several months later and she showed me the picture on Facebook of what was once viewed as a terrible problem … something that would be life-changing and horrific. It turned out that this little baby, a little boy named Aidan, was now the biggest blessing of this young woman's life. And there was his smiling face on Facebook. I realized just the publicity of this bill, of this baby's heartbeat … It's like putting a bumper sticker or a the billboard across the state: Abortion stops a beating heart. But with this bill, a beating heart will stop abortion. That's the difference.

 

Connect with Janet Porter

·         At Faith 2 Action: f2a.org

·         On Facebook

·         On Twitter

·         On YouTube

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

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Janet Porter Tells Story Behind Success of Heartbeat Bills