The Spirituality of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with Dr. Alveda King

The Spirituality of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with Dr. Alveda King

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was more than a civil rights activist. He believed in being an example of God's love and studying God's Word. Listen as Dr. King's niece, Dr. Alveda King, shares memories of her uncle, his faith, and what you can learn from his spiritual life.

9 Minutes • 3 months ago

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

With Stephen Strang

Guest: Dr. Alveda King

 

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Today, January 21, 2019, is Martin Luther King Day. It is a national holiday honoring the life of the civil rights leader who would have been 90 years old this month. His actual birthday was the 15th, but we celebrate it. To talk to us about it is my long-time and very good friend Alveda King, who is his niece and who actually lived several years in the same home as Martin Luther King Jr. and saw all the things that unfolded during the Civil Rights Movement, including his assassination in 1968, and then the death and assassination really of her own father, A.D. King. I hope that we can talk about a very important subject, and that is his (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s) spirituality.

  

Read About Martin Luther King Jr. on Charisma

·         The Hebrew Influence in the Life, Name of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

·         Powers and Principalities: The Truth About Martin

·         How Martin Luther King Jr. Still Speaks to Us Today

 

The Spirituality of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Dr. Alveda King: I’d be happy to talk about the spirituality of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., my own dad, his brother, Reverend A.D. King, and Daddy King, Martin Luther King Sr. Steve, you already know because I talked about it sometimes, Martin and A.D., ML and A.D., were known as the Sons of Thunder. With a little humor, people would say well if they are the sons of thunder Daddy King must have been the thunder A lot of people don't know that as Baptist preachers, they were a little bit unusual in that they did a little more reading of the Bible not only just taking a text, so to speak, and reading a little of the Bible, but they went deeply into the letters and the accounts and the Gospels and that kind of thing, also over into the Old Testament, when they were teaching. They knew they were not perfect, but they serve a perfect God. As a matter of fact, one of my favorite messages from my uncle ML with his sermon, A Knock at Midnight, where he talks about how he was embroiled in the Civil Rights Movement. Rosa Parks refused to take that seat on the bus and she had come to him. The movement was moving forward and the people were making tremendous demands. The way my uncle would say it, almost like the Hebrews when they were leaving Egypt, and it was so difficult. So, Uncle ML began to pray while he was having a cup of coffee at midnight at his home and he pretty much said, ‘God I don't know if I can do this, but leading this great people and it's so hard and it's so difficult. He said that he heard the voice of Jesus say, ‘Martin Luther stand up for truth, stand up for justice and lo I will never leave you even until the ends of the earth. That strengthened Uncle ML and his own spiritual life began to change. Many people say he's often compared to King David, an imperfect man who was after God's own heart and some people call ML the black Moses, the Liberator. Some even say, you remember John the Revelator who wrote the book of Revelations, talked about the love of God. Then you've got the book of John and first, second and third John, and the book of Revelation. What you hear there is the talk about the love of God. Martin Luther King Jr.’s message agape love.

 

Stephen Strang: He's very well known for that and embodied that in so many ways. I'm personally very grateful that our nation has acknowledged did in the sense that a national holiday was created. Virtually every city in America of any size has a Martin Luther King Boulevard. I drove down the one in our area just a day or two ago. I'm not too far from St. Augustine, Florida, which was one of the pivotal fights for civil rights with the sit-in at the lunch counter at Woolworth’s and throwing the acid in the swimming pool. That's a whole different discussion. And someday I hope that you can visit St. Augustine and we can visit some of these places. But what I wanted to ask you is what do you hope that people remember about your famous uncle considering that every 12 months this rolls around, and so that it doesn't just become routine. But what do you hope people take away from his life and legacy?

 

The Life and Legacy of Dr. King

Dr. Alveda King: I believe that if my uncle, Martin Luther King Jr, were here today, he would say don't spend your time arguing about the wall, or it's okay to abort a baby and all of these different kinds of things. He said, don't forget to take care of the poor. Don't forget the baby in the womb. Don't forget the sick. Don't forget the elderly. Learn how to love each other. One of my favorite quotes of his is, we must learn to live together as brothers and I add a sister or we will perish together as fools. He also said when you value the human personality, you won't kill anybody. So, he would say don't be violent in seeking your solution. Seek the love of God and love each other. I really believe if he were here today, that would still be his message because those are the things that he said during his lifetime.

 

Stephen Strang: That's a wonderful thing to remember. You know you mention protecting life in the womb. And that is really a focus, especially this weekend because of the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. And there was a great March for Life in Washington, D.C., and you were there. And while it's been reported in different ways, I wanted you to just comment on your personal view of what happened as a participant.

 

Dr. Alveda King: Well, of course Vice President Pence spoke at the rally. President Donald Trump spoke via video, a live feed. There were so many young people here, as is always the case, people regardless of nationality or creed or ethnic differences. All of that came together. That one blood, one human race, I saw it in action here; people from every walk of life. So, I believe that we are moving forward in America to begin to value the life in the womb.

 

Conclusion

Stephen Strang: I hope you enjoyed my interview with Dr. Alveda King. I so admire the way that she speaks up for righteousness, the way that she articulates things so well. She is a contributor for Fox News, which means you see are on TV a lot. She speaks many different places, including this March for Life. I've recorded podcasts with her in the past. In fact, you can go on charismapodcastnetwork/show/strangreport.if you're interested in listening to our other podcasts. The most recent one I did just a couple of weeks ago was one of the biggest podcasts I've ever done. She was talking about the wall and today, she talked about her famous uncle. I've had the privilege of her giving me a tour of the birth home and the King Center. In fact, the picture that we're using with the newsletter is a picture that I had taken with her in front of the birth home there in Atlanta, just a block or so down the street from The King Center, along with a couple of her sons. I just found the picture and I thought this would be great for Martin Luther King Day.

 

Of course, podcasts are heard long after we post them. I very often don't date it. But, I just thought it was significant that we're putting this online. We're putting it with my Strang Report newsletter on Martin Luther King Day because we want to honor his life and legacy. He wasn't a perfect man, but then none of us are. A lot of people say that about Donald Trump. So, we have to keep in mind that God uses imperfect people. Martin Luther King changed America more than almost anyone else in our generation. And, we thank God for that.

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

 

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

With Stephen Strang

Guest: Dr. Alveda King

 

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Today, January 21, 2019, is Martin Luther King Day. It is a national holiday honoring the life of the civil rights leader who would have been 90 years old this month. His actual birthday was the 15th, but we celebrate it. To talk to us about it is my long-time and very good friend Alveda King, who is his niece and who actually lived several years in the same home as Martin Luther King Jr. and saw all the things that unfolded during the Civil Rights Movement, including his assassination in 1968, and then the death and assassination really of her own father, A.D. King. I hope that we can talk about a very important subject, and that is his (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s) spirituality.

  

Read About Martin Luther King Jr. on Charisma

·         The Hebrew Influence in the Life, Name of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

·         Powers and Principalities: The Truth About Martin

·         How Martin Luther King Jr. Still Speaks to Us Today

 

The Spirituality of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Dr. Alveda King: I’d be happy to talk about the spirituality of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., my own dad, his brother, Reverend A.D. King, and Daddy King, Martin Luther King Sr. Steve, you already know because I talked about it sometimes, Martin and A.D., ML and A.D., were known as the Sons of Thunder. With a little humor, people would say well if they are the sons of thunder Daddy King must have been the thunder A lot of people don't know that as Baptist preachers, they were a little bit unusual in that they did a little more reading of the Bible not only just taking a text, so to speak, and reading a little of the Bible, but they went deeply into the letters and the accounts and the Gospels and that kind of thing, also over into the Old Testament, when they were teaching. They knew they were not perfect, but they serve a perfect God. As a matter of fact, one of my favorite messages from my uncle ML with his sermon, A Knock at Midnight, where he talks about how he was embroiled in the Civil Rights Movement. Rosa Parks refused to take that seat on the bus and she had come to him. The movement was moving forward and the people were making tremendous demands. The way my uncle would say it, almost like the Hebrews when they were leaving Egypt, and it was so difficult. So, Uncle ML began to pray while he was having a cup of coffee at midnight at his home and he pretty much said, ‘God I don't know if I can do this, but leading this great people and it's so hard and it's so difficult. He said that he heard the voice of Jesus say, ‘Martin Luther stand up for truth, stand up for justice and lo I will never leave you even until the ends of the earth. That strengthened Uncle ML and his own spiritual life began to change. Many people say he's often compared to King David, an imperfect man who was after God's own heart and some people call ML the black Moses, the Liberator. Some even say, you remember John the Revelator who wrote the book of Revelations, talked about the love of God. Then you've got the book of John and first, second and third John, and the book of Revelation. What you hear there is the talk about the love of God. Martin Luther King Jr.’s message agape love.

 

Stephen Strang: He's very well known for that and embodied that in so many ways. I'm personally very grateful that our nation has acknowledged did in the sense that a national holiday was created. Virtually every city in America of any size has a Martin Luther King Boulevard. I drove down the one in our area just a day or two ago. I'm not too far from St. Augustine, Florida, which was one of the pivotal fights for civil rights with the sit-in at the lunch counter at Woolworth’s and throwing the acid in the swimming pool. That's a whole different discussion. And someday I hope that you can visit St. Augustine and we can visit some of these places. But what I wanted to ask you is what do you hope that people remember about your famous uncle considering that every 12 months this rolls around, and so that it doesn't just become routine. But what do you hope people take away from his life and legacy?

 

The Life and Legacy of Dr. King

Dr. Alveda King: I believe that if my uncle, Martin Luther King Jr, were here today, he would say don't spend your time arguing about the wall, or it's okay to abort a baby and all of these different kinds of things. He said, don't forget to take care of the poor. Don't forget the baby in the womb. Don't forget the sick. Don't forget the elderly. Learn how to love each other. One of my favorite quotes of his is, we must learn to live together as brothers and I add a sister or we will perish together as fools. He also said when you value the human personality, you won't kill anybody. So, he would say don't be violent in seeking your solution. Seek the love of God and love each other. I really believe if he were here today, that would still be his message because those are the things that he said during his lifetime.

 

Stephen Strang: That's a wonderful thing to remember. You know you mention protecting life in the womb. And that is really a focus, especially this weekend because of the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. And there was a great March for Life in Washington, D.C., and you were there. And while it's been reported in different ways, I wanted you to just comment on your personal view of what happened as a participant.

 

Dr. Alveda King: Well, of course Vice President Pence spoke at the rally. President Donald Trump spoke via video, a live feed. There were so many young people here, as is always the case, people regardless of nationality or creed or ethnic differences. All of that came together. That one blood, one human race, I saw it in action here; people from every walk of life. So, I believe that we are moving forward in America to begin to value the life in the womb.

 

Conclusion

Stephen Strang: I hope you enjoyed my interview with Dr. Alveda King. I so admire the way that she speaks up for righteousness, the way that she articulates things so well. She is a contributor for Fox News, which means you see are on TV a lot. She speaks many different places, including this March for Life. I've recorded podcasts with her in the past. In fact, you can go on charismapodcastnetwork/show/strangreport.if you're interested in listening to our other podcasts. The most recent one I did just a couple of weeks ago was one of the biggest podcasts I've ever done. She was talking about the wall and today, she talked about her famous uncle. I've had the privilege of her giving me a tour of the birth home and the King Center. In fact, the picture that we're using with the newsletter is a picture that I had taken with her in front of the birth home there in Atlanta, just a block or so down the street from The King Center, along with a couple of her sons. I just found the picture and I thought this would be great for Martin Luther King Day.

 

Of course, podcasts are heard long after we post them. I very often don't date it. But, I just thought it was significant that we're putting this online. We're putting it with my Strang Report newsletter on Martin Luther King Day because we want to honor his life and legacy. He wasn't a perfect man, but then none of us are. A lot of people say that about Donald Trump. So, we have to keep in mind that God uses imperfect people. Martin Luther King changed America more than almost anyone else in our generation. And, we thank God for that.

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

 

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The Spirituality of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with Dr. Alveda King