Rick Joyner's Prophetic Dream of Massive Cuban Revival Is Coming to Pass

Rick Joyner's Prophetic Dream of Massive Cuban Revival Is Coming to Pass

In this episode, Russell Black shares how when Castro took power, he said he would clear the next generation's memory of any thoughts of God. But even Castro couldn't stop the Holy Spirit from saving souls and performing miracles. "The great revival of Cuba has been going on almost 30 years, especially among the youth," Black says. Listen to hear more of what is happening in Cuba and why Rick Joyner's prophetic dream is coming true.

24 Minutes • 2 months ago

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

with Stephen Strang

Guest: Russell Black

In this episode, Russell Black shares how when Castro took power, he said he would clear the next generation's memory of any thoughts of God. But even Castro couldn't stop the Holy Spirit from saving souls and performing miracles.

"The great revival of Cuba has been going on almost 30 years, especially among the youth," Black says. Listen to hear more of what is happening in Cuba and why Rick Joyner's prophetic dream is coming true.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: This is Stephen Strang. I want to introduce my listeners to Charisma magazine if you don't already get it. If you do get it, you could respond to this special offer, and we will continue your subscription into the future. The offer is to give you both of my books on Donald Trump, God and Donald Trump and the new one, Trump Aftershock. These are a value of just less than $50 plus two years of Charisma, which costs around $40. And you can get the whole thing for only $39. Now, let me repeat. You get both of my best-selling books, and two years of charisma for only $39. And all you have to do is go to this site, trumpbooks.charismamag.com. I'll repeat it. But the good thing about a podcast is you can back it up and listen to it again. It’s trumpbooks.charismamag.com. I hope you'll take advantage of this offer. Even if you have read the books, you know it's always nice to have a new book, especially one signed by the author. It makes a good birthday present, later in the year it will make a good Christmas present. I hope that you'll take advantage of it because it's a good offer. It’s my way to try to connect you with Charisma and also get more copies of my book out there. Thank you for listening to the Strang Report. And here's my episode.

·         Read the Strang Report: How Rick Joyner’s Prophetic Dream of Massive Cuban Revival is Coming to Pass

Stephen Strang: It's been six decades since Fidel Castro took over as dictator of Cuba, and Cuba has never been the same. Hello, everyone. This is Stephen Strang and this week, I visited Havana, Cuba. I went as a tourist and I'm just interested in what's happening spiritually because even though Cuba is a communist country, even though it's still repressed economically in many ways, there are changes. My guest today is Russell Black, who, I'll call him, a missionary to Cuba, a contact that I have through my sister-in-law, Rosella Ridings, who visited Cuba on kind of a missions trip recently and put us in touch. So, welcome, Russell, and thank you for taking time to be on my Strang Report podcast today. What I'm interested in is kind of an update on what's happening spiritually in Cuba. When I found out I was going down, I was inquiring what stories I might run into, who I might be able to meet. It ended up that I was not able to meet anyone, but I knew that talking to you would actually give me and my readers and listeners an up-to-date report of what God is doing in Cuba.

 

The Cuban Church on Charisma

·         How Will Cuba’s New Leader Affect the Church?

·         Cuba Opens First Church Since Communist Rule Began in 1959

·         Meeting the Spiritual Needs of Cuba

·         Contrary to Popular Opinion, Christians Still Face Persecution in Cuba

·         Castro Couldn’t Kill Christianity in Cuba

 

Russell Black: Yes, sir. Great to be with you today on the podcast. I've been working in Cuba since October 1993. I've never been able to live there. My intention was to live there full-time, but they're very restrictive on missionaries in Cuba, especially American citizens. So, I tried to get in and I couldn’t. But I live as close as you can. I live in south Miami, and I travel in on a regular basis. It's been just an amazing experience to see what God's been doing in Cuba, really, for almost 30 years. It seems like it started almost sovereignly as an outpouring of the Holy Spirit close to the time that the Soviet Union fell. And God began to visit the country in little pockets of outpourings. From what I can gather, there had been a Charismatic experience even amongst the Methodists going back to the late 1950s. And of course, there was some classical Pentecostal denominations as well, but after Castro took over, there was a repression that took place. Over half the pastors left the country. Many pastors felt like there was going to be some sort of situation similar to what happened in the Soviet Union or China. Ultimately, the decade of the 1960s was very difficult, but never came to a place that they actually on a big scale shut down churches. The government came in and society changed and a lot of the pastors left. There was an overall bad feeling towards Christians. So, many people just walked away from the church and for almost 30 years, the church was depressed, attendance dropped to almost nothing. And then starting around 1989, God began to just sovereignly visit the church. There was a remnant that had held on for all those many, many years. I think they just prepared a place for the Holy Spirit to come in. There were places where the Holy Spirit would just so powerfully upon the believers that miracles became so commonplace that they didn't even get surprised by them anymore. One of the places that really poured out is in the western part of the country and the Lord just began to visit, especially this man that ultimately became the bishop of the Methodist Church.

·         Cuba Opens Its First New Church Since the Revolution 60 Years Ago

For six months in his small church in the provincial capital of Pinar del Rio, they would have on the weekends, like eight services just to fit all the people in. They would hand out tickets first thing in the morning to tell people what time they could come back to service during the day. It would be such a visitation that the traffic would be shut down outside the church and literally thousands of people were healed and saved. It came to a place at one time when they actually begin to send people from the local hospital … hopeless cases that medically they couldn't do anything for them. They said, we don't know anything else we can do for you but there is a church down the street where God is healing people. So, why don't you go visit that church. So, that seemed to happen there, and other pockets spread across the country. There was an awakening that took place. It came right along the same time that the Soviet Union fell. When the Soviet Union pulled out of Cuba, there became a very difficult economic time for the country and the government had to pull back and they lost a lot of the really heavy control they had. At the same time, God began to visit and the churches began to get filled up again. After 30 years of very small gatherings, even in big churches, the churches began to have such a great outpouring that it was standing room only. It happened especially amongst the youth. One of the things that I've learned is that at one time, maybe in the late 1970s, or maybe in the early 1960s, Fidel Castro said, if you give me one generation, I will wipe off of their memory all thoughts of God. It’s like that was a challenge to God. He said, watch what I do. And really the great revival of Cuba that’s been going on almost 30 years has been a revival, especially amongst the youth. Today, the churches are just overflowing, standing room only, generally multiple services in many churches, and miracles, healings lives transformed, alcoholics, people with very rough backgrounds getting transformed. So, it's been just an incredible experience to see this happening even today. I've seen ups and downs, starts and stops in this, but the last time I was in is six weeks ago, it seems like everyone is expecting a fresh wave of the Holy Spirit to come through with a great harvest again there. That's kind of a synopsis of what's been happening over these last 25-plus years that I've been going in

.

·         Rick Joyner: Cuban Revival Coming

 

Stephen Strang: Well, that's very interesting. I remember as a child hearing about what was going on in Cuba. I'm old enough to remember that I was pretty young. But there was a revolution that took place and the communists came within 90 miles of Key West, Florida. That's how far Havana is. My family moved from the Midwest to Florida in September 1962. That was approximately a month before what we call the Cuban Missile Crisis. When I was in Havana this week, we saw some guns and different things that they had there that they say were from that era, some missiles on display to remember it. The Bay of Pigs failed invasion happened along at that time a little bit before the Cuban Missile Crisis. But I can remember everyone in Florida was very, very concerned about the potential of nuclear war, and thankfully that was averted. But in Florida, we have a lot of Cuban refugees; a lot more in Miami where you live than in Central Florida where I live. But when I was in college, I dated a girl whose parents were refugees. In fact, I think she was born in Cuba. I remember her mother spoke almost no English back then. But we were very aware of all of this happening. The emotion down here was very strong, and my impression was that Fidel Castro was unusually brutal as communist dictators go because communism in different parts of the world, like in Albania, seemed to be a whole lot worse than it was in places like even the Soviet Union where they had at least a measure of religious freedom. Apparently, Castro allowed some freedom, but as you say, church attendance went down to practically nothing. They tried to stamp out Christianity, which, in Cuba, is mostly Roman Catholic. The Pentecostals are down there, of course, and Pentecostalism today is a force all through Latin America, but as you say it started about the time that the Soviet Union fell.

I've heard reports. I know the Assemblies of God has really tried to reach Cuba. I've been in services where missionaries came back. In fact, in one service, I remember there were maybe a bunch of Cuban pastors that had been allowed into the United States to attend and they had like a choir. I remember it was a very moving service. Then I would hear about people like you who would go back and forth. Even my sister-in-law Rosella, in more recent days, made what she kind of considered to be a missionary trip to see what she could do to help. I had always wanted to go to Cuba, but the United States made it very difficult for Americans to go. There was an embargo against Cuba financially. We wouldn't import cars and Cuba has become famous for its 1950s American cars because they got no more cars after that. You know the situation a whole lot more than I do. But it was just interesting to go in as a tourist with a lot of stereotypes and to kind of see it. But one thing that struck me when I woke up and we had just docked in the port there … they call it the San Francisco port … is I looked out my window of my state room and I could see churches. There was a Russian Orthodox Church with a gold dome. There were several cathedrals that were very, very old. I could tell the Castro had not totally stamped out religion in Cuba.

 

Russell Black: It was surprising to me as well, even from the day I arrived in October of 1993. The churches were still functioning. I've studied a lot about what happened in Russian in China. From what I've gathered, Christianity was discouraged but it wasn't prohibited and the churches, other than a few small cases, were allowed to function and there were very few churches shut down. So, interestingly as well is that during the 1950s, there was a pretty big missions effort made, especially from the United States, some from Canada to go in and plant churches. Thank God for that because many of those churches were the ones that were planted and continued to work throughout the last 60 years. One of the rules that the Castro regime brought down was that you could have a church and whatever it looked like, whatever it functioned as before the revolution in 1959, it could continue to do that. But one of the big restrictions was they could not build or even make repairs to churches for many years. Much of that has changed now. Actually, because of that, the whole semi-underground church planting movement started, and literally thousands of churches were planted in homes and even homes were bought just to become new churches. For the most part, except for some resistance and some retaliation from the government, many of those churches have been allowed to continue. Someone told me a few years ago that before Castro took over, there was roughly 800 Protestant churches in all of Cuba. And today, this was actually a statistic given by the Ministry of Religious Affairs in Cuba, that there are over 10,000 churches today.

So once again, because of repression and persecution, instead of decreasing it actually increased from roughly 800 to over 10,000 today. I don't think they really have a good handle on how many there are today as a whole. But another interesting fact about Cuba is that, just like many of the countries in Latin America, the Catholic Church was predominant. I would say probably 90 percent of the population were practicing Catholics. One of the differences in Cuba was all religious activity was discouraged throughout the early years of the Communist Revolution. On the other side, when things began to open up again, the Catholic Church had diminished significantly. Then God began to pour His Spirit out on the Protestant churches. I would say there's probably more practicing evangelical Protestant Christians in Cuba today than there are Catholic believers. By and large, a vast majority of those believers are Charismatic Pentecostals as well. The interesting thing is that the Methodist Church in Cuba is full blown Pentecostal Charismatic in its expression and about half of the Baptist churches in Cuba as well and the Nazarenes as well. Really, much of the church growth has come from an outpouring of the Holy Spirit, people accepting that and experiencing, enjoying the power of God that way.

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

with Stephen Strang

Guest: Russell Black

In this episode, Russell Black shares how when Castro took power, he said he would clear the next generation's memory of any thoughts of God. But even Castro couldn't stop the Holy Spirit from saving souls and performing miracles.

"The great revival of Cuba has been going on almost 30 years, especially among the youth," Black says. Listen to hear more of what is happening in Cuba and why Rick Joyner's prophetic dream is coming true.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: This is Stephen Strang. I want to introduce my listeners to Charisma magazine if you don't already get it. If you do get it, you could respond to this special offer, and we will continue your subscription into the future. The offer is to give you both of my books on Donald Trump, God and Donald Trump and the new one, Trump Aftershock. These are a value of just less than $50 plus two years of Charisma, which costs around $40. And you can get the whole thing for only $39. Now, let me repeat. You get both of my best-selling books, and two years of charisma for only $39. And all you have to do is go to this site, trumpbooks.charismamag.com. I'll repeat it. But the good thing about a podcast is you can back it up and listen to it again. It’s trumpbooks.charismamag.com. I hope you'll take advantage of this offer. Even if you have read the books, you know it's always nice to have a new book, especially one signed by the author. It makes a good birthday present, later in the year it will make a good Christmas present. I hope that you'll take advantage of it because it's a good offer. It’s my way to try to connect you with Charisma and also get more copies of my book out there. Thank you for listening to the Strang Report. And here's my episode.

·         Read the Strang Report: How Rick Joyner’s Prophetic Dream of Massive Cuban Revival is Coming to Pass

Stephen Strang: It's been six decades since Fidel Castro took over as dictator of Cuba, and Cuba has never been the same. Hello, everyone. This is Stephen Strang and this week, I visited Havana, Cuba. I went as a tourist and I'm just interested in what's happening spiritually because even though Cuba is a communist country, even though it's still repressed economically in many ways, there are changes. My guest today is Russell Black, who, I'll call him, a missionary to Cuba, a contact that I have through my sister-in-law, Rosella Ridings, who visited Cuba on kind of a missions trip recently and put us in touch. So, welcome, Russell, and thank you for taking time to be on my Strang Report podcast today. What I'm interested in is kind of an update on what's happening spiritually in Cuba. When I found out I was going down, I was inquiring what stories I might run into, who I might be able to meet. It ended up that I was not able to meet anyone, but I knew that talking to you would actually give me and my readers and listeners an up-to-date report of what God is doing in Cuba.

 

The Cuban Church on Charisma

·         How Will Cuba’s New Leader Affect the Church?

·         Cuba Opens First Church Since Communist Rule Began in 1959

·         Meeting the Spiritual Needs of Cuba

·         Contrary to Popular Opinion, Christians Still Face Persecution in Cuba

·         Castro Couldn’t Kill Christianity in Cuba

 

Russell Black: Yes, sir. Great to be with you today on the podcast. I've been working in Cuba since October 1993. I've never been able to live there. My intention was to live there full-time, but they're very restrictive on missionaries in Cuba, especially American citizens. So, I tried to get in and I couldn’t. But I live as close as you can. I live in south Miami, and I travel in on a regular basis. It's been just an amazing experience to see what God's been doing in Cuba, really, for almost 30 years. It seems like it started almost sovereignly as an outpouring of the Holy Spirit close to the time that the Soviet Union fell. And God began to visit the country in little pockets of outpourings. From what I can gather, there had been a Charismatic experience even amongst the Methodists going back to the late 1950s. And of course, there was some classical Pentecostal denominations as well, but after Castro took over, there was a repression that took place. Over half the pastors left the country. Many pastors felt like there was going to be some sort of situation similar to what happened in the Soviet Union or China. Ultimately, the decade of the 1960s was very difficult, but never came to a place that they actually on a big scale shut down churches. The government came in and society changed and a lot of the pastors left. There was an overall bad feeling towards Christians. So, many people just walked away from the church and for almost 30 years, the church was depressed, attendance dropped to almost nothing. And then starting around 1989, God began to just sovereignly visit the church. There was a remnant that had held on for all those many, many years. I think they just prepared a place for the Holy Spirit to come in. There were places where the Holy Spirit would just so powerfully upon the believers that miracles became so commonplace that they didn't even get surprised by them anymore. One of the places that really poured out is in the western part of the country and the Lord just began to visit, especially this man that ultimately became the bishop of the Methodist Church.

·         Cuba Opens Its First New Church Since the Revolution 60 Years Ago

For six months in his small church in the provincial capital of Pinar del Rio, they would have on the weekends, like eight services just to fit all the people in. They would hand out tickets first thing in the morning to tell people what time they could come back to service during the day. It would be such a visitation that the traffic would be shut down outside the church and literally thousands of people were healed and saved. It came to a place at one time when they actually begin to send people from the local hospital … hopeless cases that medically they couldn't do anything for them. They said, we don't know anything else we can do for you but there is a church down the street where God is healing people. So, why don't you go visit that church. So, that seemed to happen there, and other pockets spread across the country. There was an awakening that took place. It came right along the same time that the Soviet Union fell. When the Soviet Union pulled out of Cuba, there became a very difficult economic time for the country and the government had to pull back and they lost a lot of the really heavy control they had. At the same time, God began to visit and the churches began to get filled up again. After 30 years of very small gatherings, even in big churches, the churches began to have such a great outpouring that it was standing room only. It happened especially amongst the youth. One of the things that I've learned is that at one time, maybe in the late 1970s, or maybe in the early 1960s, Fidel Castro said, if you give me one generation, I will wipe off of their memory all thoughts of God. It’s like that was a challenge to God. He said, watch what I do. And really the great revival of Cuba that’s been going on almost 30 years has been a revival, especially amongst the youth. Today, the churches are just overflowing, standing room only, generally multiple services in many churches, and miracles, healings lives transformed, alcoholics, people with very rough backgrounds getting transformed. So, it's been just an incredible experience to see this happening even today. I've seen ups and downs, starts and stops in this, but the last time I was in is six weeks ago, it seems like everyone is expecting a fresh wave of the Holy Spirit to come through with a great harvest again there. That's kind of a synopsis of what's been happening over these last 25-plus years that I've been going in

.

·         Rick Joyner: Cuban Revival Coming

 

Stephen Strang: Well, that's very interesting. I remember as a child hearing about what was going on in Cuba. I'm old enough to remember that I was pretty young. But there was a revolution that took place and the communists came within 90 miles of Key West, Florida. That's how far Havana is. My family moved from the Midwest to Florida in September 1962. That was approximately a month before what we call the Cuban Missile Crisis. When I was in Havana this week, we saw some guns and different things that they had there that they say were from that era, some missiles on display to remember it. The Bay of Pigs failed invasion happened along at that time a little bit before the Cuban Missile Crisis. But I can remember everyone in Florida was very, very concerned about the potential of nuclear war, and thankfully that was averted. But in Florida, we have a lot of Cuban refugees; a lot more in Miami where you live than in Central Florida where I live. But when I was in college, I dated a girl whose parents were refugees. In fact, I think she was born in Cuba. I remember her mother spoke almost no English back then. But we were very aware of all of this happening. The emotion down here was very strong, and my impression was that Fidel Castro was unusually brutal as communist dictators go because communism in different parts of the world, like in Albania, seemed to be a whole lot worse than it was in places like even the Soviet Union where they had at least a measure of religious freedom. Apparently, Castro allowed some freedom, but as you say, church attendance went down to practically nothing. They tried to stamp out Christianity, which, in Cuba, is mostly Roman Catholic. The Pentecostals are down there, of course, and Pentecostalism today is a force all through Latin America, but as you say it started about the time that the Soviet Union fell.

I've heard reports. I know the Assemblies of God has really tried to reach Cuba. I've been in services where missionaries came back. In fact, in one service, I remember there were maybe a bunch of Cuban pastors that had been allowed into the United States to attend and they had like a choir. I remember it was a very moving service. Then I would hear about people like you who would go back and forth. Even my sister-in-law Rosella, in more recent days, made what she kind of considered to be a missionary trip to see what she could do to help. I had always wanted to go to Cuba, but the United States made it very difficult for Americans to go. There was an embargo against Cuba financially. We wouldn't import cars and Cuba has become famous for its 1950s American cars because they got no more cars after that. You know the situation a whole lot more than I do. But it was just interesting to go in as a tourist with a lot of stereotypes and to kind of see it. But one thing that struck me when I woke up and we had just docked in the port there … they call it the San Francisco port … is I looked out my window of my state room and I could see churches. There was a Russian Orthodox Church with a gold dome. There were several cathedrals that were very, very old. I could tell the Castro had not totally stamped out religion in Cuba.

 

Russell Black: It was surprising to me as well, even from the day I arrived in October of 1993. The churches were still functioning. I've studied a lot about what happened in Russian in China. From what I've gathered, Christianity was discouraged but it wasn't prohibited and the churches, other than a few small cases, were allowed to function and there were very few churches shut down. So, interestingly as well is that during the 1950s, there was a pretty big missions effort made, especially from the United States, some from Canada to go in and plant churches. Thank God for that because many of those churches were the ones that were planted and continued to work throughout the last 60 years. One of the rules that the Castro regime brought down was that you could have a church and whatever it looked like, whatever it functioned as before the revolution in 1959, it could continue to do that. But one of the big restrictions was they could not build or even make repairs to churches for many years. Much of that has changed now. Actually, because of that, the whole semi-underground church planting movement started, and literally thousands of churches were planted in homes and even homes were bought just to become new churches. For the most part, except for some resistance and some retaliation from the government, many of those churches have been allowed to continue. Someone told me a few years ago that before Castro took over, there was roughly 800 Protestant churches in all of Cuba. And today, this was actually a statistic given by the Ministry of Religious Affairs in Cuba, that there are over 10,000 churches today.

So once again, because of repression and persecution, instead of decreasing it actually increased from roughly 800 to over 10,000 today. I don't think they really have a good handle on how many there are today as a whole. But another interesting fact about Cuba is that, just like many of the countries in Latin America, the Catholic Church was predominant. I would say probably 90 percent of the population were practicing Catholics. One of the differences in Cuba was all religious activity was discouraged throughout the early years of the Communist Revolution. On the other side, when things began to open up again, the Catholic Church had diminished significantly. Then God began to pour His Spirit out on the Protestant churches. I would say there's probably more practicing evangelical Protestant Christians in Cuba today than there are Catholic believers. By and large, a vast majority of those believers are Charismatic Pentecostals as well. The interesting thing is that the Methodist Church in Cuba is full blown Pentecostal Charismatic in its expression and about half of the Baptist churches in Cuba as well and the Nazarenes as well. Really, much of the church growth has come from an outpouring of the Holy Spirit, people accepting that and experiencing, enjoying the power of God that way.

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

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Rick Joyner's Prophetic Dream of Massive Cuban Revival Is Coming to Pass