Arthlene Rippy Part 2: Unpacking President Trump's Often Overlooked Spiritual Roots

Arthlene Rippy Part 2: Unpacking President Trump's Often Overlooked Spiritual Roots

It's hard to deny that God has been using Donald Trump in a huge way since his election—not only in the U.S. but across the world. In Part 2 of his interview with television talk show host Arthlene Rippy, Stephen Strang gets to the heart of what Trump is all about spiritually. 

 

 

19 Minutes • 19 days ago

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

with Stephen Strang

Guest: Arthlene Rippy

Part 2

It's hard to deny that God has been using Donald Trump in a huge way since his election—not only in the U.S. but across the world. In Part 2 of my interview with television talk show host Arthlene Rippy, Stephen Strang gets to the heart of what Trump is all about spiritually. 

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Hello everyone. My latest book is Trump Aftershock. I continue to do interviews both on radio and TV. One of the best was with Arthlene Rippy on the Christian Television Network. Arthlene told me that I could share it with my podcast listeners. So, here is an excerpt from that excellent interview with Arthlene and I hope you enjoy it. I hope it makes you interested in my book.

·         Read the Strang Report: Uncanny Parallels Between Trump’s Revival Roots and Korea’s Prophetic Future

Arthlene Rippy: Thank you for staying over. I kind of twisted his arm yesterday. There's so much to talk about in this book, Trump Aftershock. I hope you saw the last program but, if not, we'll recap just a little bit. My wonderful guest Stephen Strang wrote this book first. We did talk about that a few months ago. God and Donald Trump and this is his newest book, Trump Aftershock. I think it is so appropriately named. Did you consider other words than Aftershock? It's perfect.

·         Listen to Part 1 of Arthlene Rippy’s interview with Stephen Strang

Stephen Strang: No, originally we were going to call it just Aftershock and found out there was another book called Aftershock that had something to do with finances. It has been out several years. If you're publishing as I am, the way you solve that is you put Aftershock colon, and like a real long subtitle. But as we thought about it, we thought this isn't just any … In fact, I found as I was talking to people about the book, they'd asked me, what kind of aftershock is it? It's a Trump Aftershock. It's all the things that we didn't really expect after the election, both good and bad.

Arthlene Rippy: In a nutshell, though, we were not used to having a candidate go through and say, I'm going to do this, this, this, this and this. He changed the whole method that we were used to. He got in office and did all of them.

Stephen Strang: Probably more than any other president in the first two years, and that's what I document in the book. But I also document the reaction where there were almost riots. Cars were burned. There's reason to believe that these protesters, a lot of them were actually paid. This was actually planned. It was a reaction on the part of the radical left. They never thought that Trump would get in there. They've been having their way for decades, and he has messed up their game. He's also messed up the Deep State, and even the Republican Party, which aren't nearly as sinister, of course. But he's just shaken up everything. He's a disrupter. Most of the things that people don't like about him is because he's disrupting their nice little status quo.

Arthlene Rippy: Do you know another thing I find just ingenious, but it's so much with this personality, it’s how he goes around when it comes to fake news. If he's walking to a plane, he will have a press conference. All day long, we're kind of getting messages from him. I think that's pretty brilliant to get around all of the mainstream news; they do not like him. They don't always tell the truth at all. But he's getting to the people anyway.

Stephen Strang: A lot of it is through Twitter, of course. The interesting thing is that they will take his Twitter feeds, even the fake news that wouldn't cover something, and they'll actually reprint exactly what it looks like. And so yes, you're right. He's getting to the people, and he's brilliant. He understands this intuitively in a way that no politician in our lifetime has done.

Arthlene Rippy: It has been an interesting ride, that's for sure. When we finished talking yesterday, kind of talking about Melania, his wife, and you say you have not met her. She's very lovely, very much a lady and a very devout Catholic. Now, Trump's background really is Presbyterian. But you've kind of raised something that makes us believe there's something more on his mother's side as far as the faith is concerned.

Stephen Strang: His mother comes from Scotland and the state church in Scotland, of course, it's the Presbyterian Church. She was actually in a breakaway denomination, kind of a branch of Presbyterianism that was not the state church; kind of like a Free church. She lived in the Hebrides Islands, which are very remote islands kind of on the northwest side of Scotland. And they're very devout people. They take their Presbyterianism very, very seriously. Even today, where the Presbyterian church in our nation, of course, there are a number of different denominations, but the mainstream Presbyterians have become very, very liberal, even embracing gay marriage. He was not raised like that. He was raised a very conservative Presbyterian. His mother came over here married his father. It was very important to her to raise her five children in the church. They went to church virtually every Sunday. They actually went to the oldest Presbyterian church in America. He went through confirmation. He has shown his confirmation picture to verify his legitimacy as a Christian. He was also given a Bible as confirmation by his mother. He took the oath of office on two Bibles. One was the Bible that Lincoln took the oath of office on, which is a historical piece, of course. Then the Bible that his mother gave him. In fact, in the book, there's actually a picture section and a picture, and I talk a little bit about that Bible.

Arthlene Rippy: But there was a great revival in the Hebrides. What's was the years, or do you know about when that happened?

Stephen Strang: I researched this for my book, Trump Aftershock. There was a great revival in the Hebrides Islands. Donald Trump's mother was from the Hebrides Islands. It also relates, interestingly, to Kim Jong Un. In fact, we were writing the book while that great summit was going on in Singapore, and I was researching this and I believe that there's almost a spiritual parallel that very few people know. First of all, the Hebrides revival was from 1948 to 1951. The story goes that two old women, too old to go to church, prayed in that revival. This is documented in history. The women's name was Smith, and there are those who believe that those two old women were Donald Trump's great aunts. There are other people that say that's apocryphal, but here's the truth. If they were the aunts or not, the Hebrides revival affected virtually everyone in the Hebrides Islands and that would have included all of Donald Trump's extended family. There are some stories that his mother was in the Hebrides Islands. Actually, she had she moved to America in the early 1930s. But her family would have been certainly influenced. She was a very conservative Christian. She was from a very conservative branch of Presbyterianism, which is the state church in Scotland. They really believed the Bible and she wanted her son raised in the Presbyterian Church, went to confirmation, she gave him a Bible for his confirmation which he used in his swearing in. Around the world, there is a parallel with Kim Jong Un. Of course, North Korea is one of the most godless regimes in the history of mankind right; one of the most oppressive even today. What most people don’t know and which I didn't really know until I researched it, was that in 1909, there was a great revival in Korea. There was no North and South Korea. It was a great revival. It was so great that there was that Pyongyang, which is the capital of North Korea today, was given the nickname “The Jerusalem of Asia.” Over 3,000 Presbyterian churches started. This was back kind of in the era of Azusa Street, only a couple of years after Azusa Street, but Pentecost had not made it around the world. So, these were Presbyterians. Here's the interesting thing. Kim Jong Un’s family was involved in that revival. His grandfather was the dictator who brought communism to Korea and fought the Korean War. He was raised a Presbyterian. Obviously, he rejected it. The dictator’s father was a Presbyterian elder. His father was a Presbyterian pastor. There were 3,000 churches back then in what today is North Korea. Today, there are two churches that are only used for propaganda purposes. You have to wonder how much history would have been different. Here's the interesting parallel. The Hebrides Revival, which was almost exactly the same years as a Korean War, the late 1940s, early 1950s, Hebrides was called the Jerusalem of Europe. It's just interesting that people put the two tags on. Both were Presbyterians. You just kind of have to wonder about the parallels. You don’t know if this is true or not, but I think that it makes you at least go hmmm, I wonder what God is up to.

Arthlene Rippy: I know and it ought to be very thought provoking for Americans, to think that you could have a presence of the Lord in a nation one way or another and then so completely and absolutely reject it.

Stephen Strang: In Trump Aftershock, I talk about Korea and the South Koreans had been praying for a reunification of the two Koreas and also for revival. They want to flood North Korea with missionaries. In fact, we have a mutual friend in Alex Clattenburg. He was actually in Korea in May, the month before the Great Summit. He said he went to a six-hour prayer meeting where they were praying for the unification of Korea. I believe that God is answering their prayers. And in that summit, President Trump, when he gave a press conference afterwards and some reporter asked him, he said he talked to Kim Jong Un about religious liberties and I believe that as this plays out, time will tell. I think that not only will we get denuclearization, which is the goal, we all want that. But I believe that Kim Jong Un will make Korea more open to the gospel.

For the rest of Arthlene Rippy’s interview with Stephen Strang, please click here.

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

with Stephen Strang

Guest: Arthlene Rippy

Part 2

It's hard to deny that God has been using Donald Trump in a huge way since his election—not only in the U.S. but across the world. In Part 2 of my interview with television talk show host Arthlene Rippy, Stephen Strang gets to the heart of what Trump is all about spiritually. 

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Hello everyone. My latest book is Trump Aftershock. I continue to do interviews both on radio and TV. One of the best was with Arthlene Rippy on the Christian Television Network. Arthlene told me that I could share it with my podcast listeners. So, here is an excerpt from that excellent interview with Arthlene and I hope you enjoy it. I hope it makes you interested in my book.

·         Read the Strang Report: Uncanny Parallels Between Trump’s Revival Roots and Korea’s Prophetic Future

Arthlene Rippy: Thank you for staying over. I kind of twisted his arm yesterday. There's so much to talk about in this book, Trump Aftershock. I hope you saw the last program but, if not, we'll recap just a little bit. My wonderful guest Stephen Strang wrote this book first. We did talk about that a few months ago. God and Donald Trump and this is his newest book, Trump Aftershock. I think it is so appropriately named. Did you consider other words than Aftershock? It's perfect.

·         Listen to Part 1 of Arthlene Rippy’s interview with Stephen Strang

Stephen Strang: No, originally we were going to call it just Aftershock and found out there was another book called Aftershock that had something to do with finances. It has been out several years. If you're publishing as I am, the way you solve that is you put Aftershock colon, and like a real long subtitle. But as we thought about it, we thought this isn't just any … In fact, I found as I was talking to people about the book, they'd asked me, what kind of aftershock is it? It's a Trump Aftershock. It's all the things that we didn't really expect after the election, both good and bad.

Arthlene Rippy: In a nutshell, though, we were not used to having a candidate go through and say, I'm going to do this, this, this, this and this. He changed the whole method that we were used to. He got in office and did all of them.

Stephen Strang: Probably more than any other president in the first two years, and that's what I document in the book. But I also document the reaction where there were almost riots. Cars were burned. There's reason to believe that these protesters, a lot of them were actually paid. This was actually planned. It was a reaction on the part of the radical left. They never thought that Trump would get in there. They've been having their way for decades, and he has messed up their game. He's also messed up the Deep State, and even the Republican Party, which aren't nearly as sinister, of course. But he's just shaken up everything. He's a disrupter. Most of the things that people don't like about him is because he's disrupting their nice little status quo.

Arthlene Rippy: Do you know another thing I find just ingenious, but it's so much with this personality, it’s how he goes around when it comes to fake news. If he's walking to a plane, he will have a press conference. All day long, we're kind of getting messages from him. I think that's pretty brilliant to get around all of the mainstream news; they do not like him. They don't always tell the truth at all. But he's getting to the people anyway.

Stephen Strang: A lot of it is through Twitter, of course. The interesting thing is that they will take his Twitter feeds, even the fake news that wouldn't cover something, and they'll actually reprint exactly what it looks like. And so yes, you're right. He's getting to the people, and he's brilliant. He understands this intuitively in a way that no politician in our lifetime has done.

Arthlene Rippy: It has been an interesting ride, that's for sure. When we finished talking yesterday, kind of talking about Melania, his wife, and you say you have not met her. She's very lovely, very much a lady and a very devout Catholic. Now, Trump's background really is Presbyterian. But you've kind of raised something that makes us believe there's something more on his mother's side as far as the faith is concerned.

Stephen Strang: His mother comes from Scotland and the state church in Scotland, of course, it's the Presbyterian Church. She was actually in a breakaway denomination, kind of a branch of Presbyterianism that was not the state church; kind of like a Free church. She lived in the Hebrides Islands, which are very remote islands kind of on the northwest side of Scotland. And they're very devout people. They take their Presbyterianism very, very seriously. Even today, where the Presbyterian church in our nation, of course, there are a number of different denominations, but the mainstream Presbyterians have become very, very liberal, even embracing gay marriage. He was not raised like that. He was raised a very conservative Presbyterian. His mother came over here married his father. It was very important to her to raise her five children in the church. They went to church virtually every Sunday. They actually went to the oldest Presbyterian church in America. He went through confirmation. He has shown his confirmation picture to verify his legitimacy as a Christian. He was also given a Bible as confirmation by his mother. He took the oath of office on two Bibles. One was the Bible that Lincoln took the oath of office on, which is a historical piece, of course. Then the Bible that his mother gave him. In fact, in the book, there's actually a picture section and a picture, and I talk a little bit about that Bible.

Arthlene Rippy: But there was a great revival in the Hebrides. What's was the years, or do you know about when that happened?

Stephen Strang: I researched this for my book, Trump Aftershock. There was a great revival in the Hebrides Islands. Donald Trump's mother was from the Hebrides Islands. It also relates, interestingly, to Kim Jong Un. In fact, we were writing the book while that great summit was going on in Singapore, and I was researching this and I believe that there's almost a spiritual parallel that very few people know. First of all, the Hebrides revival was from 1948 to 1951. The story goes that two old women, too old to go to church, prayed in that revival. This is documented in history. The women's name was Smith, and there are those who believe that those two old women were Donald Trump's great aunts. There are other people that say that's apocryphal, but here's the truth. If they were the aunts or not, the Hebrides revival affected virtually everyone in the Hebrides Islands and that would have included all of Donald Trump's extended family. There are some stories that his mother was in the Hebrides Islands. Actually, she had she moved to America in the early 1930s. But her family would have been certainly influenced. She was a very conservative Christian. She was from a very conservative branch of Presbyterianism, which is the state church in Scotland. They really believed the Bible and she wanted her son raised in the Presbyterian Church, went to confirmation, she gave him a Bible for his confirmation which he used in his swearing in. Around the world, there is a parallel with Kim Jong Un. Of course, North Korea is one of the most godless regimes in the history of mankind right; one of the most oppressive even today. What most people don’t know and which I didn't really know until I researched it, was that in 1909, there was a great revival in Korea. There was no North and South Korea. It was a great revival. It was so great that there was that Pyongyang, which is the capital of North Korea today, was given the nickname “The Jerusalem of Asia.” Over 3,000 Presbyterian churches started. This was back kind of in the era of Azusa Street, only a couple of years after Azusa Street, but Pentecost had not made it around the world. So, these were Presbyterians. Here's the interesting thing. Kim Jong Un’s family was involved in that revival. His grandfather was the dictator who brought communism to Korea and fought the Korean War. He was raised a Presbyterian. Obviously, he rejected it. The dictator’s father was a Presbyterian elder. His father was a Presbyterian pastor. There were 3,000 churches back then in what today is North Korea. Today, there are two churches that are only used for propaganda purposes. You have to wonder how much history would have been different. Here's the interesting parallel. The Hebrides Revival, which was almost exactly the same years as a Korean War, the late 1940s, early 1950s, Hebrides was called the Jerusalem of Europe. It's just interesting that people put the two tags on. Both were Presbyterians. You just kind of have to wonder about the parallels. You don’t know if this is true or not, but I think that it makes you at least go hmmm, I wonder what God is up to.

Arthlene Rippy: I know and it ought to be very thought provoking for Americans, to think that you could have a presence of the Lord in a nation one way or another and then so completely and absolutely reject it.

Stephen Strang: In Trump Aftershock, I talk about Korea and the South Koreans had been praying for a reunification of the two Koreas and also for revival. They want to flood North Korea with missionaries. In fact, we have a mutual friend in Alex Clattenburg. He was actually in Korea in May, the month before the Great Summit. He said he went to a six-hour prayer meeting where they were praying for the unification of Korea. I believe that God is answering their prayers. And in that summit, President Trump, when he gave a press conference afterwards and some reporter asked him, he said he talked to Kim Jong Un about religious liberties and I believe that as this plays out, time will tell. I think that not only will we get denuclearization, which is the goal, we all want that. But I believe that Kim Jong Un will make Korea more open to the gospel.

For the rest of Arthlene Rippy’s interview with Stephen Strang, please click here.

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

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Arthlene Rippy Part 2: Unpacking President Trump's Often Overlooked Spiritual Roots