Stephen Strang: After 5 Years, What God Taught Me About Fear, Faith and Cancer

Stephen Strang: After 5 Years, What God Taught Me About Fear, Faith and Cancer

In 2014, doctors officially pronounced Charisma Founder and CEO Stephen Strang as “cancer free.” Threatened with a “severe prognosis” of perhaps living only five years, God laid his hand upon Stephen and healed him from the dreaded disease.

Stephen continues to lead Charisma Media into the future, and sat down with Charisma Publisher and Charisma Podcast Network Executive Producer Dr. Steve Greene to talk about his battle with cancer and how God touched him in 2014.

30 Minutes • 4 months ago

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

with Stephen Strang

Guest Host: Dr. Steve Greene

 

In 2014, doctors officially pronounced Charisma Founder and CEO Stephen Strang as “cancer free.” Threatened with a “severe prognosis” of perhaps living only five years, God laid his hand upon Stephen and healed him from the dreaded disease.

 

Stephen continues to lead Charisma Media into the future, and sat down with Charisma Publisher and Charisma Podcast Network Executive Producer Dr. Steve Greene to talk about his battle with cancer and how God touched him in 2014.

 

Check out Stephen’s Strang Report newsletter on this milestone on charismamag.com.

 

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Today we have a very special guest, me. You probably wonder why it’s me. Well, it's because something very significant happened in my life five years ago today, January 24, the day that we're running the podcast. Of course, podcasts are online basically forever. We're going to talk today about fear, faith and cancer, because it was five years ago that I became cancer free. We were talking about the fact that I wanted to do a podcast, and Dr. Steve Greene, who is one of the smartest people I know, had an idea and his idea was that he would interview me which is much easier than me trying to figure out objectively what would be interesting. So, I'm going to introduce Dr. Greene who's should be well known to everyone who has listened to the Charisma Podcast Network, a very significant part of the leadership team here at Charisma Media and one of my very best friends. So, with that, I'll turn it over to you.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Steve, I want to first of all do what I should not do and that's correct you. It wasn't five years ago today that you were cancer free. We’re celebrating you being cancer free for five years effective today. You are five years without cancer, that's what's amazing  We like to celebrate around here particularly significant events that we call Stones of Remembrance, or we go through things where we build memorial stones so that we can point to our children and say this was what happened here. This is where we cross the river. And in a very literal sense, you had that experience as you were threatened with a surgery; a very severe prognosis of maybe only living five years. So, let's start there with your feelings when you first heard those words, that you've got a problem.

 

·         Overcoming Cancer, Charisma Publisher Steve Strang Shares Private Battle

·         Strang Report Podcast: What is the State of Cancer in Our Culture?

 

Stephen Strang: I remember well going into the doctor's office after having a biopsy and I fully expected to be told that I was fine. I was diagnosed as having prostate cancer, which is something that 22 percent of all males will be diagnosed with during their lifetime. The reason I say that is it a number of men will have prostate cancer when they die and not even know about it. They find this out with autopsies. Occasionally there will be a car wreck or something where they do an autopsy and they find this. I just think that's a significant statistic. So, from the time I was 40, when I would go to the doctor once a year, I would get tested. There's a test; they call it the PSA test. Every single male over the age of 40 should take it. It is not a perfect test, but it's the best they have to diagnose that there might be cancer there. And my PSA numbers were not bad, but they weren't good. And so, we were just kind of watching it. Finally, I decided that I just needed to know. The doctor had encouraged me to get a biopsy. But there are some dangers to biopsies, which is a whole different discussion, but the only way you can diagnose prostate cancer is with a biopsy. They actually take some cells; in my case they took 12 samples and then they look at the cells and out of the 12 samples, seven came back as cancerous. So, I walked in thinking I'd be fine. And I walked out a cancer patient, complete with a little bag that said cancer. At the hospital, they had some kind of cancer center with all kinds of books in it. Before the day was out, they were booking appointments. It was a very interesting odyssey. At first it was hard for me to even to tell people I had cancer. It was so serious to me that in some cases I felt like I needed to do it in person instead of by text or by email. I did not widely publicize it or maybe I should say report it partly because I felt it was really nobody's business and I wanted to deal with it myself. I was dealing with my own emotions, of course. I didn't even publicly talk about it until it was over. Then I wrote a column in Charisma magazine and gave glory to God and put it online. It was quite widely distributed.

 

Stephen’s Cancer Journey

It's just a very interesting thing that I had to walk through. And many people have to walk through it. They talk about the different levels of grief and I don't know that it applies exactly, but at first, I couldn't believe it, and then I was timid to talk about it. And then what am I going to do? I found out that there's actually seven different things that you can do with prostate cancer. There is no chemo. With some cancers, there's chemo. I kind of thought they were going to be operating the next week because I know some women that had breast cancer and they were in surgery within seven days. Actually, I had a fishing trip with a bunch of buddies up in Canada. I'd never done it before. I was really concerned I was going to have to miss the fishing trip. As it turned out, I went. Actually it was good to be off and secluded, away from all media several hundred miles from any kind of civilization. We had to fly in on little airplane and land on a lake. It was quite an experience, and I was able to grapple with it. They were Christian guys, and they prayed with me and it really meant a lot. So I move from kind of fear because the cancer word, most people are very fearful. In fact, some guys when they get the diagnosis of prostate cancer, they just freak out. It’s like just get the thing out, which has some pretty nasty side effects, ramifications, if you pick the wrong treatment. There are several different treatments that you are almost sure that you will wear a diaper the rest of your life and whatever sex life you have is over. There are other treatments that where there's hope that you can come through it OK. And medical science is doing a much better job of treating this disease. So, I researched this and I ended up not doing surgery not doing radiation, which are the two main ones. There are a couple of others that if it was important to go through, I almost I felt like I became an amateur expert just with all the research I did to decide what was right for me. Also, I had to take charge of my own health. I decided to do this podcast and write a newsletter hopefully to help people because a lot of people have to go through cancer.

 

A couple of people very close to me just very, very recently, one lady here on staff here has had had to go through breast cancer. one of my very best friends just went through prostate cancer and I kind of helped walk him through it. In fact, he called me yesterday on the phone and told me something he was dealing with and asked if that’s normal. I said, no, you need to go see your urologist. I said, I'm not a doctor, but I think you really should check it out. But a lot of people will just do whatever the insurance company does whatever their doctor says, and at the risk of sounding cynical, I'm going to say what I've said before because this is absolutely the truth of what I found. Every doctor, with no exceptions, pushed what they made money at. And the doctors also were very critical of the other procedures. Now, this included the procedure I did. My own doctor, now I had come to the conclusion that he was right. But I just found this; that I had to take charge of my own health. The hospital had run up several tens of thousands of dollars of bills with tests. Actually, the test helped us know that the cancer had not metastasized, which is really the dangerous thing. Prostate cancer, as I came to find out, is very slow growing. In fact, some men who find out about it, it just grows so slow they just don't do anything and they're older and they die of a heart attack or something first. But prostate cancer does not kill you. What happens is it will metastasize; it sends cancer cells to other things generally nearby the bladder like the pancreas, even the intestines or the bones. Usually it's bone cancer. And my research led me to believe that I probably had about three years before it metastasized. I knew from actually a friend who for whatever reason, didn't get the treatment he really needed, he got bone cancer and he was dead in two years. It's very, very painful they say. Som three years in two years would have been five years. That's about where we are now. I have no proof that that's right. That was my speculation. I was having to make decisions. I'm too young to have waited to do nothing. I was in stage one, but I was moving towards stage two. So, I really needed to do something. It's not really dangerous since until stage three, and then it stage for it's a death sentence.

 

·         HIFU: HIFU or High Intensity Focus Ultrasound procedure may be an option for men diagnosed with organ-confined prostate cancer. During the procedure, precisely focused ultrasound waves raise the temperature of the targeted prostate tissue to 195 degrees Fahrenheit in 2-3 seconds.

 

Strong Faith

Stephen Strang: So, I had to move from fear to faith. For me it was to believe God that I would find the right treatment, the right doctor and have a good outcome. From the very time I was sitting in the doctor's office, I never said I'm going to do nothing and I'm going to call every prayer line in America to pray for me. We did have people pray of course, but I did not get my name put on every prayer sheet because I didn't want people really to know. I just I recognized that God heals through medical science as well as through faith healing. I've known people that, bless their heart, they did they believe God that they'd be healed and they weren't. You have to wonder why. Sometimes we just have to accept that it's their way to go. But I did have strong faith. I had some ups and downs.

 

Treatment

I had to decide what treatment I was going to take. I actually visited Germany to see one of the very best doctors in the world with the with the procedure called HIFU, or High Intensity Focused ultrasound. Most people could understand that they focus light and, in the process, it becomes a laser that they can actually do surgery with in the way that they used to do with a scalpel. But, much less invasive. In the same way they focused ultrasound, and in the

 

process they obliterate the cancerous prostate, a lot like radiation does. But radiation kills good cells on its way to the prostate cancer and good cells on the way out. It is so strong they have to do it in 39 doses every day for 39 days, kipping weekends. I always wondered if it was so important to do it every day why they skipped weekend. I think it's because the doctors don't want to work on the weekend. But if they did it in one setting, it would kill you. It would absolutely kill you. With HIFU, the procedure was two hours and I was in the hospital for six hours. I ended up having to go out of the country to get it because the FDA at the time considered it experimental. In fact, that's what a lot of the doctors said, Oh, it's experimental. They don't know. Well, it's been around for 25 years, more or less. And the results, while not perfect, are significantly better than the other procedures. They talk about if you're a good candidate. I was a good candidate. They caught it early, I'm healthy, the cancer was contained; it had not metastasized. The ones where it's not successful generally we're not good candidates. But I had to come to a point where I decided no, I'm going to decide, I'm going to pick the doctor and I did, and I'm glad I did. I think that our health care system which is in a mess would be better if people would take charge of it.

 

Cause for Celebration

Dr. Steve Greene: So we're here five years later. We celebrate. We've got balloons behind us. To celebrate the fact that five years free is a significant date. Now you have a new prognosis and a new thought. What is the prognosis over you? What are doctors saying about it now?

 

Stephen Strang: I go into the urologist every six months for a routine blood test, and my PSA level is less than .01. It has remained that way. If it goes up, that's an indication that maybe the cancer has reemerged somewhere. Sometimes there's an isolated cancer cell floating around somewhere that they can’t identify and it shows up. So, in my case, it hasn't shown up, it hasn't gone up at all. I'm healthy. When I have opportunity like this to talk about it, I'm happy to do it. When my friend went through this, when he found he had prostate cancer in just the last few months and went through this procedure. … he went through the same procedure that I did, partly because of my good experience and partly because I had done so much research. I shared with him what I knew, but I encouraged him to do his own research. Don't take my word for it. And he did the research. He got this procedure. So, I'm happy to talk about it. But other than that, to me, it's like an unpleasant dream. It happened, but it doesn't seem really real. Thank God I was one of the ones that came through it with no problems, and I'm very, very thankful I had just heard over the years that when people went through cancer treatment of whatever kind if they survived five years, they considered that a success. Now, no one's going to live forever. So, you can go through a successful prostate cancer or any kind of cancer treatment, and eventually you're going to die of something. Whoever it was that came up with five years, I just always heard it. So, whenever I had this procedure, I just thought to myself, I hope everything's OK in five years. I just had that in the back of my mind. Now that it's rolled around. I'm happy to do this.

 

I got to know a lot of prostate cancer survivors and people that were dealing with it. It's like, it's like a community. In fact, it's kind of like a fraternity. Somebody said it's a fraternity that nobody wants to join. But just instantly when people when survivors or people that are coping with it found out I had prostate cancer, immediately there was acceptance and support. They would answer questions. That was kind of neat to find out. I even started my own little prostate cancer group on Facebook. I don't go to it much anymore. But every year I would post something. It's been one more year or something like that. I think it's something about HIFU for prostate cancer, something like that. People could go on Facebook and check it out if they want to. And I will in the next few days post this podcast and my newsletter, people will be interested in it, I think, because a lot of the people that I dealt with believe in God and would share very similar values. A lot don't. But what I found is that even those who don't believe in God, it's almost as if they want to believe in God. Because it's like, if you believe in God, they're not going to just dissuade you or be critical about saying that you pray about it or things like that.

 

Unfortunately, a lot of men deal with very, very serious things or it metastasizes. They say that 44,000 men a year in America die of prostate cancer. It's not literally prostate cancer, but it developed into something else. They literally die and most of the time is because they didn't catch it until stage four. So if I can leave anything to those who are listening because I know that all the people listening read my newsletter, a certain percentage of the men. a fairly small percentage would have prostate cancer. Or, maybe it's developing and it's not been diagnosed yet. So, I hope that I encourage them to get it checked out. The sooner you deal with it, the better and also to believe that God will help you navigate all of this stuff.

 

For more of Stephen’s story, visit cpnshows.com. {eoa}

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

with Stephen Strang

Guest Host: Dr. Steve Greene

 

In 2014, doctors officially pronounced Charisma Founder and CEO Stephen Strang as “cancer free.” Threatened with a “severe prognosis” of perhaps living only five years, God laid his hand upon Stephen and healed him from the dreaded disease.

 

Stephen continues to lead Charisma Media into the future, and sat down with Charisma Publisher and Charisma Podcast Network Executive Producer Dr. Steve Greene to talk about his battle with cancer and how God touched him in 2014.

 

Check out Stephen’s Strang Report newsletter on this milestone on charismamag.com.

 

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Today we have a very special guest, me. You probably wonder why it’s me. Well, it's because something very significant happened in my life five years ago today, January 24, the day that we're running the podcast. Of course, podcasts are online basically forever. We're going to talk today about fear, faith and cancer, because it was five years ago that I became cancer free. We were talking about the fact that I wanted to do a podcast, and Dr. Steve Greene, who is one of the smartest people I know, had an idea and his idea was that he would interview me which is much easier than me trying to figure out objectively what would be interesting. So, I'm going to introduce Dr. Greene who's should be well known to everyone who has listened to the Charisma Podcast Network, a very significant part of the leadership team here at Charisma Media and one of my very best friends. So, with that, I'll turn it over to you.

 

Dr. Steve Greene: Steve, I want to first of all do what I should not do and that's correct you. It wasn't five years ago today that you were cancer free. We’re celebrating you being cancer free for five years effective today. You are five years without cancer, that's what's amazing  We like to celebrate around here particularly significant events that we call Stones of Remembrance, or we go through things where we build memorial stones so that we can point to our children and say this was what happened here. This is where we cross the river. And in a very literal sense, you had that experience as you were threatened with a surgery; a very severe prognosis of maybe only living five years. So, let's start there with your feelings when you first heard those words, that you've got a problem.

 

·         Overcoming Cancer, Charisma Publisher Steve Strang Shares Private Battle

·         Strang Report Podcast: What is the State of Cancer in Our Culture?

 

Stephen Strang: I remember well going into the doctor's office after having a biopsy and I fully expected to be told that I was fine. I was diagnosed as having prostate cancer, which is something that 22 percent of all males will be diagnosed with during their lifetime. The reason I say that is it a number of men will have prostate cancer when they die and not even know about it. They find this out with autopsies. Occasionally there will be a car wreck or something where they do an autopsy and they find this. I just think that's a significant statistic. So, from the time I was 40, when I would go to the doctor once a year, I would get tested. There's a test; they call it the PSA test. Every single male over the age of 40 should take it. It is not a perfect test, but it's the best they have to diagnose that there might be cancer there. And my PSA numbers were not bad, but they weren't good. And so, we were just kind of watching it. Finally, I decided that I just needed to know. The doctor had encouraged me to get a biopsy. But there are some dangers to biopsies, which is a whole different discussion, but the only way you can diagnose prostate cancer is with a biopsy. They actually take some cells; in my case they took 12 samples and then they look at the cells and out of the 12 samples, seven came back as cancerous. So, I walked in thinking I'd be fine. And I walked out a cancer patient, complete with a little bag that said cancer. At the hospital, they had some kind of cancer center with all kinds of books in it. Before the day was out, they were booking appointments. It was a very interesting odyssey. At first it was hard for me to even to tell people I had cancer. It was so serious to me that in some cases I felt like I needed to do it in person instead of by text or by email. I did not widely publicize it or maybe I should say report it partly because I felt it was really nobody's business and I wanted to deal with it myself. I was dealing with my own emotions, of course. I didn't even publicly talk about it until it was over. Then I wrote a column in Charisma magazine and gave glory to God and put it online. It was quite widely distributed.

 

Stephen’s Cancer Journey

It's just a very interesting thing that I had to walk through. And many people have to walk through it. They talk about the different levels of grief and I don't know that it applies exactly, but at first, I couldn't believe it, and then I was timid to talk about it. And then what am I going to do? I found out that there's actually seven different things that you can do with prostate cancer. There is no chemo. With some cancers, there's chemo. I kind of thought they were going to be operating the next week because I know some women that had breast cancer and they were in surgery within seven days. Actually, I had a fishing trip with a bunch of buddies up in Canada. I'd never done it before. I was really concerned I was going to have to miss the fishing trip. As it turned out, I went. Actually it was good to be off and secluded, away from all media several hundred miles from any kind of civilization. We had to fly in on little airplane and land on a lake. It was quite an experience, and I was able to grapple with it. They were Christian guys, and they prayed with me and it really meant a lot. So I move from kind of fear because the cancer word, most people are very fearful. In fact, some guys when they get the diagnosis of prostate cancer, they just freak out. It’s like just get the thing out, which has some pretty nasty side effects, ramifications, if you pick the wrong treatment. There are several different treatments that you are almost sure that you will wear a diaper the rest of your life and whatever sex life you have is over. There are other treatments that where there's hope that you can come through it OK. And medical science is doing a much better job of treating this disease. So, I researched this and I ended up not doing surgery not doing radiation, which are the two main ones. There are a couple of others that if it was important to go through, I almost I felt like I became an amateur expert just with all the research I did to decide what was right for me. Also, I had to take charge of my own health. I decided to do this podcast and write a newsletter hopefully to help people because a lot of people have to go through cancer.

 

A couple of people very close to me just very, very recently, one lady here on staff here has had had to go through breast cancer. one of my very best friends just went through prostate cancer and I kind of helped walk him through it. In fact, he called me yesterday on the phone and told me something he was dealing with and asked if that’s normal. I said, no, you need to go see your urologist. I said, I'm not a doctor, but I think you really should check it out. But a lot of people will just do whatever the insurance company does whatever their doctor says, and at the risk of sounding cynical, I'm going to say what I've said before because this is absolutely the truth of what I found. Every doctor, with no exceptions, pushed what they made money at. And the doctors also were very critical of the other procedures. Now, this included the procedure I did. My own doctor, now I had come to the conclusion that he was right. But I just found this; that I had to take charge of my own health. The hospital had run up several tens of thousands of dollars of bills with tests. Actually, the test helped us know that the cancer had not metastasized, which is really the dangerous thing. Prostate cancer, as I came to find out, is very slow growing. In fact, some men who find out about it, it just grows so slow they just don't do anything and they're older and they die of a heart attack or something first. But prostate cancer does not kill you. What happens is it will metastasize; it sends cancer cells to other things generally nearby the bladder like the pancreas, even the intestines or the bones. Usually it's bone cancer. And my research led me to believe that I probably had about three years before it metastasized. I knew from actually a friend who for whatever reason, didn't get the treatment he really needed, he got bone cancer and he was dead in two years. It's very, very painful they say. Som three years in two years would have been five years. That's about where we are now. I have no proof that that's right. That was my speculation. I was having to make decisions. I'm too young to have waited to do nothing. I was in stage one, but I was moving towards stage two. So, I really needed to do something. It's not really dangerous since until stage three, and then it stage for it's a death sentence.

 

·         HIFU: HIFU or High Intensity Focus Ultrasound procedure may be an option for men diagnosed with organ-confined prostate cancer. During the procedure, precisely focused ultrasound waves raise the temperature of the targeted prostate tissue to 195 degrees Fahrenheit in 2-3 seconds.

 

Strong Faith

Stephen Strang: So, I had to move from fear to faith. For me it was to believe God that I would find the right treatment, the right doctor and have a good outcome. From the very time I was sitting in the doctor's office, I never said I'm going to do nothing and I'm going to call every prayer line in America to pray for me. We did have people pray of course, but I did not get my name put on every prayer sheet because I didn't want people really to know. I just I recognized that God heals through medical science as well as through faith healing. I've known people that, bless their heart, they did they believe God that they'd be healed and they weren't. You have to wonder why. Sometimes we just have to accept that it's their way to go. But I did have strong faith. I had some ups and downs.

 

Treatment

I had to decide what treatment I was going to take. I actually visited Germany to see one of the very best doctors in the world with the with the procedure called HIFU, or High Intensity Focused ultrasound. Most people could understand that they focus light and, in the process, it becomes a laser that they can actually do surgery with in the way that they used to do with a scalpel. But, much less invasive. In the same way they focused ultrasound, and in the

 

process they obliterate the cancerous prostate, a lot like radiation does. But radiation kills good cells on its way to the prostate cancer and good cells on the way out. It is so strong they have to do it in 39 doses every day for 39 days, kipping weekends. I always wondered if it was so important to do it every day why they skipped weekend. I think it's because the doctors don't want to work on the weekend. But if they did it in one setting, it would kill you. It would absolutely kill you. With HIFU, the procedure was two hours and I was in the hospital for six hours. I ended up having to go out of the country to get it because the FDA at the time considered it experimental. In fact, that's what a lot of the doctors said, Oh, it's experimental. They don't know. Well, it's been around for 25 years, more or less. And the results, while not perfect, are significantly better than the other procedures. They talk about if you're a good candidate. I was a good candidate. They caught it early, I'm healthy, the cancer was contained; it had not metastasized. The ones where it's not successful generally we're not good candidates. But I had to come to a point where I decided no, I'm going to decide, I'm going to pick the doctor and I did, and I'm glad I did. I think that our health care system which is in a mess would be better if people would take charge of it.

 

Cause for Celebration

Dr. Steve Greene: So we're here five years later. We celebrate. We've got balloons behind us. To celebrate the fact that five years free is a significant date. Now you have a new prognosis and a new thought. What is the prognosis over you? What are doctors saying about it now?

 

Stephen Strang: I go into the urologist every six months for a routine blood test, and my PSA level is less than .01. It has remained that way. If it goes up, that's an indication that maybe the cancer has reemerged somewhere. Sometimes there's an isolated cancer cell floating around somewhere that they can’t identify and it shows up. So, in my case, it hasn't shown up, it hasn't gone up at all. I'm healthy. When I have opportunity like this to talk about it, I'm happy to do it. When my friend went through this, when he found he had prostate cancer in just the last few months and went through this procedure. … he went through the same procedure that I did, partly because of my good experience and partly because I had done so much research. I shared with him what I knew, but I encouraged him to do his own research. Don't take my word for it. And he did the research. He got this procedure. So, I'm happy to talk about it. But other than that, to me, it's like an unpleasant dream. It happened, but it doesn't seem really real. Thank God I was one of the ones that came through it with no problems, and I'm very, very thankful I had just heard over the years that when people went through cancer treatment of whatever kind if they survived five years, they considered that a success. Now, no one's going to live forever. So, you can go through a successful prostate cancer or any kind of cancer treatment, and eventually you're going to die of something. Whoever it was that came up with five years, I just always heard it. So, whenever I had this procedure, I just thought to myself, I hope everything's OK in five years. I just had that in the back of my mind. Now that it's rolled around. I'm happy to do this.

 

I got to know a lot of prostate cancer survivors and people that were dealing with it. It's like, it's like a community. In fact, it's kind of like a fraternity. Somebody said it's a fraternity that nobody wants to join. But just instantly when people when survivors or people that are coping with it found out I had prostate cancer, immediately there was acceptance and support. They would answer questions. That was kind of neat to find out. I even started my own little prostate cancer group on Facebook. I don't go to it much anymore. But every year I would post something. It's been one more year or something like that. I think it's something about HIFU for prostate cancer, something like that. People could go on Facebook and check it out if they want to. And I will in the next few days post this podcast and my newsletter, people will be interested in it, I think, because a lot of the people that I dealt with believe in God and would share very similar values. A lot don't. But what I found is that even those who don't believe in God, it's almost as if they want to believe in God. Because it's like, if you believe in God, they're not going to just dissuade you or be critical about saying that you pray about it or things like that.

 

Unfortunately, a lot of men deal with very, very serious things or it metastasizes. They say that 44,000 men a year in America die of prostate cancer. It's not literally prostate cancer, but it developed into something else. They literally die and most of the time is because they didn't catch it until stage four. So if I can leave anything to those who are listening because I know that all the people listening read my newsletter, a certain percentage of the men. a fairly small percentage would have prostate cancer. Or, maybe it's developing and it's not been diagnosed yet. So, I hope that I encourage them to get it checked out. The sooner you deal with it, the better and also to believe that God will help you navigate all of this stuff.

 

For more of Stephen’s story, visit cpnshows.com. {eoa}

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Stephen Strang: After 5 Years, What God Taught Me About Fear, Faith and Cancer