How to Pass on Your Legacy to Others with Maury Davis

How to Pass on Your Legacy to Others with Maury Davis

Listen as global pastor Maury Davis provides the steps for you, as a leader, to create a plan to pass down your legacy at your organization. He says it begins with changing your thinking and taking an assessment of your vision, staff, organizational structure, and personalities. Hear now to discover the main thing to look for in a successor.

17 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

With Stephen Strang

Maury Davis

Listen as global pastor Maury Davis provides the steps for you, as a leader, to create a plan to pass down your legacy at your organization. He says it begins with changing your thinking and taking an assessment of your vision, staff, organizational structure, and personalities.

Discover the main thing to look for in a successor.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: This is Stephen Strang. I want to introduce my listeners to Charisma magazine if you don't already get it. Or if you do get it, you could respond to this special offer and we will continue your subscription into the future. The offer is to give you both of my books on Donald Trump: God and Donald Trump and the new one. Trump Aftershock. These are a value of just less than $50 plus two years of Charisma, which costs around $40. You can get the whole package for only $39. Let me repeat, you get both of my best-selling books, and two years of Charisma for only $39. All you have to do is go to this site: Trumpbooks.charismamag.com. I hope that you'll take advantage of it because it's a good offer. It's my way to try to connect you with Charisma, and also get more copies of my book out there. Thank you for listening to the Strang Report. And here's my episode.

 

·         Read the Strang Report: How God Turned a Convicted Murderer into an AG Megachurch Pastor

·         Listen to the Strang Report: How God Turned a Convicted Murderer into a Megachurch Pastor

 

Stephen Strang: Today, we're going to talk about a very important topic on the Strang Report called leaving a legacy. The older you get, the more you have to realize that at some point, we've got to leave a legacy. My guest today is an expert about this. His name is Pastor Maury Davis, and he is even asked to speak in different places. Recently, my good friend, Sammy Rodriguez, asked him to speak at the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference about leaving a legacy. So I want to welcome you to the podcast and also tell you that the previous podcast we recorded about your testimony of how you committed a crime that included a terrible murder landed you in prison and then the Lord gloriously saved you and you ended up getting out miraculously.

OK, let's talk about this issue of leaving a legacy. Everyone grows old. Life goes on at some point and all of us are going to die. We wonder what did we leave on planet Earth. But you apparently have a system that you have been able to help others. We don't have a long time on a podcast like this, so we can't do a whole seminar. But can you give us a few pointers, maybe even pointers that you use there at Cornerstone Nashville when you passed off the church recently to your own son and how you have now become the global pastor. Maybe you could tell us what that means, too.

 

Maury Davis Books

·         The Last Ride: A 30-Day Devotional

·         Why I Believe in Santa Claus

 

Maury Davis: I went to Cornerstone church in February of 1991 and found a small, struggling church actually being repossessed on a gravel parking lot. So, in October of 2018, 27 years later, and a few months, we have one of Nashville's leading churches, the largest campus in Nashville.  It's up to date, its current, it's fit for a young generation to take it to the next level. Along the way, I just worked and worked and worked. But in about 2012, I was sitting at a roundtable with Dr. Sam Chand, and I heard for the first time of coaching pastors and consulting pastors. Before we had always gone to conferences and seminars. The more I listened and began to do research, I discovered that coaches and consultants actually create a more fruitful destination in season than conferences, because there's somebody holding you accountable. We've all been to seminars where we hear that things. We take 15 pages of notes, but we go back and don't do anything. So, I decided to add a coach consultant to my team, and brought Sam Chand on my team. He began to coach me through changing the way I think.

 

What They’re Saying About Maury Davis

·         “Pastor Maury Davis has been a great asset in my life as a leader. He has helped me to think though things and be healthier in my emotions and thought processes. He’s been a great resource to our church as we are trying to respond to God’s call and move to the next level and fulfill our potential.” – Richard Holmes, lead pastor, Trinity Harvest Church, Pikeville, Kentucky

·         “I wouldn’t have my ministry without Maury Davis speaking to me as a leader.” – Sheila Harper, Founder and President of SaveOne

·         “Pastor Maury’s visionary leadership and unending passion was the catalyst for Cornerstone Church to grow and to become the largest Assemblies of God church in Tennessee. He desires to come alongside you and to equip you to lead your church to greater growth than ever. Pastor Maury powerfully poured himself into our Tennessee pastors via three leadership roundtables during 2018 and we are going to continue building upon his expertise in the coming years. He is also personally helping me to develop into a more effective leader as District Superintendent.” – Terry G. Bailey, District Superintendent, Tennessee Assemblies of God Ministry Network

 

In 2013, I was at my doctor's office for my cholesterol medicine because I have an enchilada addiction. I love enchiladas. So, I just take Lipitor for cholesterol because it's easier than eating granola the rest of my life. He discovered some leukemia in my bloodstream. So, we were at the very beginning of a $17 million building project, and I realized that if I went to the oncologist, the bank would freak out and maybe shut the project down. So, I didn't feel like I could go and I had to do some inner research, seeking first the kingdom of God and all the things be added to you. Did I really believe if I tried to save my life I'll lose it. But if I lose my life for the kingdom, God will save it. Long story short, I went all the way to November of that year avoiding going to the doctor even though I had another blood test for my own doctor and urine samples and all that. It was worse than the second test and the first test. He really was adamant that I had to go and I just didn't feel like I could. In November of that year, I went and had Pastor George, the pastor that led me to the Lord, pray for me. He was the first person I told. We had the final approval for all the financing, all the contracts were signed so nobody could back out. I had him pray for me. I then went to the oncologist and discovered I had a supernatural healing. I didn't know if it was just a theory that my doctor had until my life insurance guy said you were diagnosed with cancer, we need to raise your life insurance policy, the premium.

Long story short, I realized at that moment that even though I'm growing and the church is growing, there is no successor. I began to talk to Dr. Chand about that. It was about the time I began to evaluate how old I would be if we did a five-year succession plan. I wanted to pass the baton, not a cane. I realized how many pastors I've watched a beyond their level of effectiveness. Because of whether its financial issues, they can't quit, or they don't know how to quit, or their identity is in their preaching, not in Christ. Paul said, I'm identified with Christ. I'm not identified with apostles, evangelism or missions. I'm identified with Christ. Our identities and our work make it very difficult. I told Sam I wanted to create a succession plan and a successor. We created one with the board of directors of my church and the elders of the church, and we began the process. It was during that five-year period between the beginning of that and the transition in October that I went back to school on renewing my mind.

I thought when I had renewed my mind in prison, reading my Bible three hours a day for five years, that my mind was renewed. I didn't realize that renewing your mind and is a perpetual challenge. The next level is in a different level of understanding or thinking or revelation, or wisdom. If you don't continue to pursue that personal development, you will create a lid that even faith won’t get over. Because, as a man thinks, so is he. So, if you want to be a legacy pastor, you have to think as a legacy pastor rather than as a lead pastor. I went through a tremendous amount of transition. I got to looking around at the number of churches that the pastors are going to be aging out, and I found that go-to in my life. I can leave what I'm doing because what I'm going to do, I believe, will actually be more effective for the kingdom of God as far as bearing fruit, and building healthier churches. So, in the process of that, we went through all the transitions, and you experience all the emotions. When you say goodbye to your church members, when you stop going to board meetings, when you stop knowing what's going on, it is an incredibly emotionally challenging season of life. Because I had Dr. Chand with me and Dr. Ron McManus, consultant coach, walking with me, we processed it in a healthy way. We were able to get it done in the church. I was in the church for the first time, Mother's Day, recently. It was the first time I had been back at church since October. It was a wonderful experience. The church has transitioned and Pastor Galen, my son, is the pastor and he's leading and people are following him. There are things that have changed. But the momentum and the attitude and the spirit of the church were incredible. I just looked and thought, we did it right. I'm grateful to God that He gave me friends to help me do that.

Stephen Strang: And what advice do you give to other pastors? Sammy Rodriguez asked you to share it. And, you do a lot of overseas missions’ work. You told me earlier that you have helped start 2,000 churches in Kenya.

Maury Davis: We built 2,000 buildings. We led a movement to build 2,000 Assembly God church buildings in the nation of Kenya. That doesn't count Bible colleges, orphanages, things like that

Stephen Strang: That is pretty impressive. Now you're a global pastor. You're sharing with others, even as you're sharing with me. So, what is the first step that someone who maybe knows that they need to deal with legacy and passing it on and so forth? What are the steps that you go through? Maybe realization is number one, or sometimes I guess circumstances just force you to deal with it.

Maury Davis: You don't want to be in the place, you're forced to deal with it. You want to get on the front end of looking a little farther in the future. The first step is to have an assessment done, which assesses you, your vision, your desires, your dreams, your staff, your organizational structure, personalities. Then, kind of figure out really where you are. In my assessment with Sam, I was a buffalo leader. I'm old school leadership. If I move, you move. If I don't move, you don't move. That's how they killed the Buffalo. They would find the big bull in the herd and shoot him and the rest of them would stand around and get shot. Now that got us to a church of 4,000. But it wouldn't get us to a church of 5,000 because you can only make so many decisions. This young generation are much more like geese. The head goose is not always at the point of the V. He can be at the back of the V, honking and sharing with the young goose who is flying at the front of the V. And because different people take the lead, they actually go farther, faster, with less energy. So, I had to transition to a different kind of thinking. You really can't do that without somebody sitting with you monthly, or every other month and saying where are we at how are we doing, and creating a transition plan. You almost need a referee between the senior pastor and the successor to say let the successor move the ball up 10 yards. It’s time to let him preach once a month, twice a month, three times a month. It’s time for you to be gone in 90 days. Let's do the metrics and see what the church’s attendance and income and youth ministry and children's ministry are. There's a lot that goes on under the hood to make sure the transition is actually working the way the plan is. You can write a plan, but if the young guy doesn't take hold of the heart of the congregation, it won't work. The young guy has to take the baton. You don't slow down. He's got to run fast enough to take it. Having a coach there watching helps everybody get on schedule and in sync.

 

Connect with Maury Davis

·         By email at info@maurydavis.com

·         On Facebook

·         At maurydavis.com

·         On Instagram

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

Episode Notes

The Strang Report

With Stephen Strang

Maury Davis

Listen as global pastor Maury Davis provides the steps for you, as a leader, to create a plan to pass down your legacy at your organization. He says it begins with changing your thinking and taking an assessment of your vision, staff, organizational structure, and personalities.

Discover the main thing to look for in a successor.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: This is Stephen Strang. I want to introduce my listeners to Charisma magazine if you don't already get it. Or if you do get it, you could respond to this special offer and we will continue your subscription into the future. The offer is to give you both of my books on Donald Trump: God and Donald Trump and the new one. Trump Aftershock. These are a value of just less than $50 plus two years of Charisma, which costs around $40. You can get the whole package for only $39. Let me repeat, you get both of my best-selling books, and two years of Charisma for only $39. All you have to do is go to this site: Trumpbooks.charismamag.com. I hope that you'll take advantage of it because it's a good offer. It's my way to try to connect you with Charisma, and also get more copies of my book out there. Thank you for listening to the Strang Report. And here's my episode.

 

·         Read the Strang Report: How God Turned a Convicted Murderer into an AG Megachurch Pastor

·         Listen to the Strang Report: How God Turned a Convicted Murderer into a Megachurch Pastor

 

Stephen Strang: Today, we're going to talk about a very important topic on the Strang Report called leaving a legacy. The older you get, the more you have to realize that at some point, we've got to leave a legacy. My guest today is an expert about this. His name is Pastor Maury Davis, and he is even asked to speak in different places. Recently, my good friend, Sammy Rodriguez, asked him to speak at the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference about leaving a legacy. So I want to welcome you to the podcast and also tell you that the previous podcast we recorded about your testimony of how you committed a crime that included a terrible murder landed you in prison and then the Lord gloriously saved you and you ended up getting out miraculously.

OK, let's talk about this issue of leaving a legacy. Everyone grows old. Life goes on at some point and all of us are going to die. We wonder what did we leave on planet Earth. But you apparently have a system that you have been able to help others. We don't have a long time on a podcast like this, so we can't do a whole seminar. But can you give us a few pointers, maybe even pointers that you use there at Cornerstone Nashville when you passed off the church recently to your own son and how you have now become the global pastor. Maybe you could tell us what that means, too.

 

Maury Davis Books

·         The Last Ride: A 30-Day Devotional

·         Why I Believe in Santa Claus

 

Maury Davis: I went to Cornerstone church in February of 1991 and found a small, struggling church actually being repossessed on a gravel parking lot. So, in October of 2018, 27 years later, and a few months, we have one of Nashville's leading churches, the largest campus in Nashville.  It's up to date, its current, it's fit for a young generation to take it to the next level. Along the way, I just worked and worked and worked. But in about 2012, I was sitting at a roundtable with Dr. Sam Chand, and I heard for the first time of coaching pastors and consulting pastors. Before we had always gone to conferences and seminars. The more I listened and began to do research, I discovered that coaches and consultants actually create a more fruitful destination in season than conferences, because there's somebody holding you accountable. We've all been to seminars where we hear that things. We take 15 pages of notes, but we go back and don't do anything. So, I decided to add a coach consultant to my team, and brought Sam Chand on my team. He began to coach me through changing the way I think.

 

What They’re Saying About Maury Davis

·         “Pastor Maury Davis has been a great asset in my life as a leader. He has helped me to think though things and be healthier in my emotions and thought processes. He’s been a great resource to our church as we are trying to respond to God’s call and move to the next level and fulfill our potential.” – Richard Holmes, lead pastor, Trinity Harvest Church, Pikeville, Kentucky

·         “I wouldn’t have my ministry without Maury Davis speaking to me as a leader.” – Sheila Harper, Founder and President of SaveOne

·         “Pastor Maury’s visionary leadership and unending passion was the catalyst for Cornerstone Church to grow and to become the largest Assemblies of God church in Tennessee. He desires to come alongside you and to equip you to lead your church to greater growth than ever. Pastor Maury powerfully poured himself into our Tennessee pastors via three leadership roundtables during 2018 and we are going to continue building upon his expertise in the coming years. He is also personally helping me to develop into a more effective leader as District Superintendent.” – Terry G. Bailey, District Superintendent, Tennessee Assemblies of God Ministry Network

 

In 2013, I was at my doctor's office for my cholesterol medicine because I have an enchilada addiction. I love enchiladas. So, I just take Lipitor for cholesterol because it's easier than eating granola the rest of my life. He discovered some leukemia in my bloodstream. So, we were at the very beginning of a $17 million building project, and I realized that if I went to the oncologist, the bank would freak out and maybe shut the project down. So, I didn't feel like I could go and I had to do some inner research, seeking first the kingdom of God and all the things be added to you. Did I really believe if I tried to save my life I'll lose it. But if I lose my life for the kingdom, God will save it. Long story short, I went all the way to November of that year avoiding going to the doctor even though I had another blood test for my own doctor and urine samples and all that. It was worse than the second test and the first test. He really was adamant that I had to go and I just didn't feel like I could. In November of that year, I went and had Pastor George, the pastor that led me to the Lord, pray for me. He was the first person I told. We had the final approval for all the financing, all the contracts were signed so nobody could back out. I had him pray for me. I then went to the oncologist and discovered I had a supernatural healing. I didn't know if it was just a theory that my doctor had until my life insurance guy said you were diagnosed with cancer, we need to raise your life insurance policy, the premium.

Long story short, I realized at that moment that even though I'm growing and the church is growing, there is no successor. I began to talk to Dr. Chand about that. It was about the time I began to evaluate how old I would be if we did a five-year succession plan. I wanted to pass the baton, not a cane. I realized how many pastors I've watched a beyond their level of effectiveness. Because of whether its financial issues, they can't quit, or they don't know how to quit, or their identity is in their preaching, not in Christ. Paul said, I'm identified with Christ. I'm not identified with apostles, evangelism or missions. I'm identified with Christ. Our identities and our work make it very difficult. I told Sam I wanted to create a succession plan and a successor. We created one with the board of directors of my church and the elders of the church, and we began the process. It was during that five-year period between the beginning of that and the transition in October that I went back to school on renewing my mind.

I thought when I had renewed my mind in prison, reading my Bible three hours a day for five years, that my mind was renewed. I didn't realize that renewing your mind and is a perpetual challenge. The next level is in a different level of understanding or thinking or revelation, or wisdom. If you don't continue to pursue that personal development, you will create a lid that even faith won’t get over. Because, as a man thinks, so is he. So, if you want to be a legacy pastor, you have to think as a legacy pastor rather than as a lead pastor. I went through a tremendous amount of transition. I got to looking around at the number of churches that the pastors are going to be aging out, and I found that go-to in my life. I can leave what I'm doing because what I'm going to do, I believe, will actually be more effective for the kingdom of God as far as bearing fruit, and building healthier churches. So, in the process of that, we went through all the transitions, and you experience all the emotions. When you say goodbye to your church members, when you stop going to board meetings, when you stop knowing what's going on, it is an incredibly emotionally challenging season of life. Because I had Dr. Chand with me and Dr. Ron McManus, consultant coach, walking with me, we processed it in a healthy way. We were able to get it done in the church. I was in the church for the first time, Mother's Day, recently. It was the first time I had been back at church since October. It was a wonderful experience. The church has transitioned and Pastor Galen, my son, is the pastor and he's leading and people are following him. There are things that have changed. But the momentum and the attitude and the spirit of the church were incredible. I just looked and thought, we did it right. I'm grateful to God that He gave me friends to help me do that.

Stephen Strang: And what advice do you give to other pastors? Sammy Rodriguez asked you to share it. And, you do a lot of overseas missions’ work. You told me earlier that you have helped start 2,000 churches in Kenya.

Maury Davis: We built 2,000 buildings. We led a movement to build 2,000 Assembly God church buildings in the nation of Kenya. That doesn't count Bible colleges, orphanages, things like that

Stephen Strang: That is pretty impressive. Now you're a global pastor. You're sharing with others, even as you're sharing with me. So, what is the first step that someone who maybe knows that they need to deal with legacy and passing it on and so forth? What are the steps that you go through? Maybe realization is number one, or sometimes I guess circumstances just force you to deal with it.

Maury Davis: You don't want to be in the place, you're forced to deal with it. You want to get on the front end of looking a little farther in the future. The first step is to have an assessment done, which assesses you, your vision, your desires, your dreams, your staff, your organizational structure, personalities. Then, kind of figure out really where you are. In my assessment with Sam, I was a buffalo leader. I'm old school leadership. If I move, you move. If I don't move, you don't move. That's how they killed the Buffalo. They would find the big bull in the herd and shoot him and the rest of them would stand around and get shot. Now that got us to a church of 4,000. But it wouldn't get us to a church of 5,000 because you can only make so many decisions. This young generation are much more like geese. The head goose is not always at the point of the V. He can be at the back of the V, honking and sharing with the young goose who is flying at the front of the V. And because different people take the lead, they actually go farther, faster, with less energy. So, I had to transition to a different kind of thinking. You really can't do that without somebody sitting with you monthly, or every other month and saying where are we at how are we doing, and creating a transition plan. You almost need a referee between the senior pastor and the successor to say let the successor move the ball up 10 yards. It’s time to let him preach once a month, twice a month, three times a month. It’s time for you to be gone in 90 days. Let's do the metrics and see what the church’s attendance and income and youth ministry and children's ministry are. There's a lot that goes on under the hood to make sure the transition is actually working the way the plan is. You can write a plan, but if the young guy doesn't take hold of the heart of the congregation, it won't work. The young guy has to take the baton. You don't slow down. He's got to run fast enough to take it. Having a coach there watching helps everybody get on schedule and in sync.

 

Connect with Maury Davis

·         By email at info@maurydavis.com

·         On Facebook

·         At maurydavis.com

·         On Instagram

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

·         On Facebook

15

0:00/17:38

How to Pass on Your Legacy to Others with Maury Davis