How God Led MLK’s Niece to Choose Forgiveness with Dr. Alveda King

How God Led MLK’s Niece to Choose Forgiveness with Dr. Alveda King

After family tragedies, Dr. Alveda King started to explore to find herself and her faith. She learned to forgive through the example of her grandfather when he forgave the man who shot his wife. Hear this in-depth interview to learn how Dr. King gave her life to Christ and why she fights for truth and light.

34 Minutes • a month ago

Episode Notes

In-Depth with

Stephen Strang

Guest: Dr. Alveda King

After family tragedies, Dr. Alveda King started to explore to find herself and her faith. She learned to forgive through the example of her grandfather when he forgave the man who shot his wife.

Hear this in-depth interview to learn how Dr. King gave her life to Christ and why she fights for truth and light.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Hello, everyone. I'm Stephen Strang and welcome to this edition of In-Depth with Stephen Strang. Today, I'm going to go in-depth with someone who knew Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. very well. It's his niece, Dr. Alva King, whom I've interviewed on my podcast before. I have two podcast formats. And this one is more in-depth. I want to find out about you as a person, about your life and so forth. But you have been on my podcast a couple of times, and most recently, it was the biggest podcast I ever had in the in the three or four years that we've been doing podcasts. So, I'm excited to have you back again today. Back then, we were talking about current events, especially some things that were going on down at the border. Today I want to talk about you. The King family is famous, and as far as I'm concerned, you have about the highest profile of any of the nearest of kin. But actually, you're on the board for the King Center, is that right?

·         Read the Strang Report: Martin Luther King’s Niece Says ‘We Can’t Hate White People’

Dr. Alveda King: I'm on the board with The King Center. I'm on the board with you and your Christian charitable organization, and, if I can say this publicly, I've had a wheelhouse, and I've had a bucket list. I'd like to be a first sometimes, so, I'm the first female, the first woman on the Promise Keepers Board. I had followed Coach McCartney, who founded it years ago, as a younger woman, because, as you know, I have four sons and two daughters, and I've had to raise the sons kind of as a single parent because of a tragic divorce. So, I was always looking for mentors and role models such as yourself for my sons. So, I found Promise Keepers to learn how to talk to young men. And all these years later, I have been appointed as the first female on the board of Promise Keepers. Isn't that something?

Dr. Alveda King on Charisma

·         Alveda King Reveals the Truth About Planned Parenthood

·         Alveda King: Liberals Rage at Gov. Northam’s Racism but Ignore Grotesque Push for Infanticide

·         Evangelist Alveda King Responds to Controversial Omarosa Book

·         Evangelist Alveda King: As Attacks Mount, Trump Still Delivers

Stephen Strang: It really is, congratulations. Promise Keepers has had a huge impact over the years. Probably more when Coach McCartney was more involved, but it's good that you're on the board and let's get right into your life. Your relationship with Dr. King was through his brother, A.D King. In fact, your name Alveda … I've never known anyone named Alveda, but it has a very special meaning that I know but I'd like you to tell my listeners. You were actually named after your father and what else?

Alveda King on Charisma Podcast Network

·         March for Life: Alveda King Reveals the Truth About Planned Parenthood

·         Special Strang Report: Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with Alveda King

Dr. Alveda King: And for life. In the romantic languages, Italian, Spanish, French, Veda derivative means life. So, my daddy said she will be Al, after me, and Veda, for life. My mother was a French major, she liked that Veda and life. So, they had to make a decision when she became pregnant with me in 1950. She was a college student and she wanted to finish college before she had a child. My grandfather, because she and dad were engaged at the time or betrothed like Mary and Joseph sort of. But my grandfather said, Naomi, they're lying to you. That's not a lump of flesh. That's my granddaughter. I've seen her in a dream three years ago, and she has bright skin and bright red hair and she's going to bless many people. So, my daddy and my mother would laugh through years of his lifetime, and mother still remembers that they chose life for me because of that prophetic word from my grandfather, Martin Luther King Sr.

Stephen Strang: That's a wonderful story. And of course, I've had the opportunity to meet your mother, who is very spry even though she's got to be close to 90 years old now. She's just one of the most loving people that I've ever had the privilege of knowing and to consider all the things that she's had to go through, the civil rights movement. In fact, let's start at the beginning because when you were very little girl, you actually lived in the same house with your grandparents and Martin Luther King Jr. and his family and it was just like one big extended family. You've taken me on a tour of the place. It's up there very close to The King Center, like maybe just a block away. It is called the King Birth Home. It's a very nice house even today, but back then, it must have been a huge house to hold three families.

Dr. Alveda King: It was actually considered a mansion. Now at that time, Daddy King and Mama King during their early days of their marriage lived there with Mama King’s family. So, Daddy King lived with his in-laws and his bride. Mama King’s father, A.D.Williams, had passed away but the mother and Lamont King and my grandmother would live there and they got married. So, for many years Daddy King and Mama King lived and they birthed their three children there. So, where Uncle M.L. was born, it’s called the King Birth Home, the King family birth home. The Park Service bought it from the family recently. So, when Martin Luther King Jr. was born, they say Daddy King, who was about 5-foot-7, maybe. I thought he was a giant, but he carried himself with such great stature. But when my uncle was born, he was present. They said he jumped and touched the top of that ceiling, and those ceilings were high in that home. I've got a son. And then when daddy was born 18 months later, he says God has given me another son. So, through the years, each members of the family have lived there. When my daddy and mother married, they live there, and four of us were born; maybe all five of their children were born while they lived as a married couple in the birth home. So that really is the King Family Gome. And it's still historically known as that today.

Stephen Strang: I've seen some pictures of you from that era. You must have been like maybe three or four, and weren’t you in the wedding of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta King?

Dr. Alveda King: Right, and I could share a little story with you about that, too. My uncle met her, I think it was, in school in Boston, if I'm correct. But they met as college students and he brought her home to say this is the woman that I'm going to marry. Daddy King had picked an Atlanta lady for him to marry and she was high society so to speak. But Uncle M.L. married this woman from Marion, Alabama. My mother, Naomi, was from Dothan, Alabama. So, he brought her home and they say I could not say her name. So, I would follow them around. She was so pretty and she reminded me of my mother. They look almost alike … same height, same hair, same figure, all of that. And I said Coco, so I fell in love with Coco Coretta, and Daddy King says well, if a little child can love her, then we love her too. I was the flower girl in their wedding.

Stephen Strang: That's a great story. Also, there's a story about how your grandfather actually chose the name Martin Luther. I don't think that story is widely known. But it's an interesting story because he actually changed his name. Could you kind of outline how that happened?

Dr. Alveda King: Steve, you're a historian, so you understand oral history. So, there are various versions of it in many family stories. But the one that granddaddy told me, and he writes about it in the book as well, Daddy King, and you can find his explanation there as well. But when he was born, he was born to parents … as a matter of fact Daddy King’s grandfather, Nathan Brandon King, was an Irishman, an immigrant from Ireland and his mother … that was his grandparents until his parents birth, a man named James came and when James was born, he was visibly … you can see the Irish ancestry. So, here you have this young man from Stockbridge, Georgia, who walked with the shoes on his back to Atlanta, Georgia, to marry a middle-class woman, Alberta. She was the descendant directly of slaves and he was descended from Europe, as well as slaves. So, you had that that mixture. So, here we have Daddy King, but when he was born, it is said that his mother wanted to name him Martin Luther. She was a historian, an educator, a lot of teachers in our family on both sides. She had in mind Martin Luther. So she was going to name my son Martin Luther, but supposedly the midwife said that's too much of a fine name for a little negro or a little colored baby. So, she wrote Michael Luther King on the birth record. That's the way granddaddy told it to me. So, he was Michael Luther, and as a young man, really all of his life, some of peers called him Big Mike. But he also said it was Martin Luther, granddaddy and his wife and his young family traveled to Europe and studied a lot of history. He changed his name and his son's name. He went to the courthouse and that was something that Negro or African Americans didn't do a lot of during those days. He changed his name and his son's name to Martin Luther King. So, Daddy King became Martin Luther King and his son became Martin Luther King, Jr.

Stephen Strang: That's an interesting story. Of course, Martin Luther was a great person in history. And I'd heard the story about when he went to Europe. Actually, I think that story is told in Eric Metaxes’ wonderful biography of Martin Luther. I think that he told that story, maybe in the forward or something like that, but it's just interesting how all these things happen. Let's move along. You would have been probably in high school during the Civil Rights Movement, or maybe junior high, and then of course, everyone knows that in April of 1968, your uncle was tragically assassinated, and, in many ways, changed history. I think the history of race relations in the United States would be better had he lived. Not that it makes any difference, but I believe that he would have been the first African-American president had he lived. But actually, he was assassinated … wasn't he still in his late 30s when he died?

Dr. Alveda King: He and his brother were the same age, 39. Now, interestingly enough, I was in junior high school at the very beginning of the 1960s. Then I graduated into high school, and then of course, into college. So, when Martin Luther King Jr. died or was killed. I was a senior, and the very next year, I got married, my daddy walked me down the aisle and then he was killed a week later. So, I grew up in the Civil Rights Movement. I marched; I went to jail all those things called fair housing. My first march was in 1963, the famous Children's March in Birmingham, Alabama, after the young girls have been killed in the church Birmingham. My daddy took me and my brothers to the Children’s March and we marched in protest of that. And then the Fair Housing movement. I was very active in Louisville, Kentucky. We lived in Birmingham for three years and Louisville, Kentucky for three years when my father was pastoring churches there. So, when my uncle died, people ask me all the time, when Martin Luther King was shot, where were you? I was at a seamstresses’ home. I've always liked to have designer clothes, clothes designed for me as well as off the rack. I was having a periwinkle gown designed for me. I can see the dress. I went to try on the garment and the TV was on, black and white TV, the box that we used to have. Martin Luther King Jr. has been shot. I remember dropping everything and rushing home. My daddy came home from Memphis, he was in Memphis when his brother was killed. He came home to get the body of his brother, but he stopped in Birmingham for us. It is a short drive between Birmingham and Atlanta. And he explained to me and to the family that his brother had been killed and he was so bereaved. And I said, Daddy, I hate white people. I hate white people. They killed my uncle. And my daddy, I can remember as I tell you, Steve, as he put his arms around me and he began to rock me, and said, Alveda, we can’t hate white people. We’re one blood. They taught Acts 17:26, of one blood God created all people. He says we can't hate white people. White people March with us. We can't white hate white people; white people go to jail with us. We can't hate white people; white people die with us. He said white people didn't kill my brother, your uncle, the devil did. We have to forgive? And he rocked me in his arms talking about love and forgiveness.

For the rest of Stephen’s interview with Dr. Alveda King, please click here.

Connect with Dr. Alveda King

·         On Facebook

·         On  Twitter

·         Priestsforlife.org

·         Alvedaking.com

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

 

·         On Facebook

 

Episode Notes

In-Depth with

Stephen Strang

Guest: Dr. Alveda King

After family tragedies, Dr. Alveda King started to explore to find herself and her faith. She learned to forgive through the example of her grandfather when he forgave the man who shot his wife.

Hear this in-depth interview to learn how Dr. King gave her life to Christ and why she fights for truth and light.

Introduction

Stephen Strang: Hello, everyone. I'm Stephen Strang and welcome to this edition of In-Depth with Stephen Strang. Today, I'm going to go in-depth with someone who knew Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. very well. It's his niece, Dr. Alva King, whom I've interviewed on my podcast before. I have two podcast formats. And this one is more in-depth. I want to find out about you as a person, about your life and so forth. But you have been on my podcast a couple of times, and most recently, it was the biggest podcast I ever had in the in the three or four years that we've been doing podcasts. So, I'm excited to have you back again today. Back then, we were talking about current events, especially some things that were going on down at the border. Today I want to talk about you. The King family is famous, and as far as I'm concerned, you have about the highest profile of any of the nearest of kin. But actually, you're on the board for the King Center, is that right?

·         Read the Strang Report: Martin Luther King’s Niece Says ‘We Can’t Hate White People’

Dr. Alveda King: I'm on the board with The King Center. I'm on the board with you and your Christian charitable organization, and, if I can say this publicly, I've had a wheelhouse, and I've had a bucket list. I'd like to be a first sometimes, so, I'm the first female, the first woman on the Promise Keepers Board. I had followed Coach McCartney, who founded it years ago, as a younger woman, because, as you know, I have four sons and two daughters, and I've had to raise the sons kind of as a single parent because of a tragic divorce. So, I was always looking for mentors and role models such as yourself for my sons. So, I found Promise Keepers to learn how to talk to young men. And all these years later, I have been appointed as the first female on the board of Promise Keepers. Isn't that something?

Dr. Alveda King on Charisma

·         Alveda King Reveals the Truth About Planned Parenthood

·         Alveda King: Liberals Rage at Gov. Northam’s Racism but Ignore Grotesque Push for Infanticide

·         Evangelist Alveda King Responds to Controversial Omarosa Book

·         Evangelist Alveda King: As Attacks Mount, Trump Still Delivers

Stephen Strang: It really is, congratulations. Promise Keepers has had a huge impact over the years. Probably more when Coach McCartney was more involved, but it's good that you're on the board and let's get right into your life. Your relationship with Dr. King was through his brother, A.D King. In fact, your name Alveda … I've never known anyone named Alveda, but it has a very special meaning that I know but I'd like you to tell my listeners. You were actually named after your father and what else?

Alveda King on Charisma Podcast Network

·         March for Life: Alveda King Reveals the Truth About Planned Parenthood

·         Special Strang Report: Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with Alveda King

Dr. Alveda King: And for life. In the romantic languages, Italian, Spanish, French, Veda derivative means life. So, my daddy said she will be Al, after me, and Veda, for life. My mother was a French major, she liked that Veda and life. So, they had to make a decision when she became pregnant with me in 1950. She was a college student and she wanted to finish college before she had a child. My grandfather, because she and dad were engaged at the time or betrothed like Mary and Joseph sort of. But my grandfather said, Naomi, they're lying to you. That's not a lump of flesh. That's my granddaughter. I've seen her in a dream three years ago, and she has bright skin and bright red hair and she's going to bless many people. So, my daddy and my mother would laugh through years of his lifetime, and mother still remembers that they chose life for me because of that prophetic word from my grandfather, Martin Luther King Sr.

Stephen Strang: That's a wonderful story. And of course, I've had the opportunity to meet your mother, who is very spry even though she's got to be close to 90 years old now. She's just one of the most loving people that I've ever had the privilege of knowing and to consider all the things that she's had to go through, the civil rights movement. In fact, let's start at the beginning because when you were very little girl, you actually lived in the same house with your grandparents and Martin Luther King Jr. and his family and it was just like one big extended family. You've taken me on a tour of the place. It's up there very close to The King Center, like maybe just a block away. It is called the King Birth Home. It's a very nice house even today, but back then, it must have been a huge house to hold three families.

Dr. Alveda King: It was actually considered a mansion. Now at that time, Daddy King and Mama King during their early days of their marriage lived there with Mama King’s family. So, Daddy King lived with his in-laws and his bride. Mama King’s father, A.D.Williams, had passed away but the mother and Lamont King and my grandmother would live there and they got married. So, for many years Daddy King and Mama King lived and they birthed their three children there. So, where Uncle M.L. was born, it’s called the King Birth Home, the King family birth home. The Park Service bought it from the family recently. So, when Martin Luther King Jr. was born, they say Daddy King, who was about 5-foot-7, maybe. I thought he was a giant, but he carried himself with such great stature. But when my uncle was born, he was present. They said he jumped and touched the top of that ceiling, and those ceilings were high in that home. I've got a son. And then when daddy was born 18 months later, he says God has given me another son. So, through the years, each members of the family have lived there. When my daddy and mother married, they live there, and four of us were born; maybe all five of their children were born while they lived as a married couple in the birth home. So that really is the King Family Gome. And it's still historically known as that today.

Stephen Strang: I've seen some pictures of you from that era. You must have been like maybe three or four, and weren’t you in the wedding of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta King?

Dr. Alveda King: Right, and I could share a little story with you about that, too. My uncle met her, I think it was, in school in Boston, if I'm correct. But they met as college students and he brought her home to say this is the woman that I'm going to marry. Daddy King had picked an Atlanta lady for him to marry and she was high society so to speak. But Uncle M.L. married this woman from Marion, Alabama. My mother, Naomi, was from Dothan, Alabama. So, he brought her home and they say I could not say her name. So, I would follow them around. She was so pretty and she reminded me of my mother. They look almost alike … same height, same hair, same figure, all of that. And I said Coco, so I fell in love with Coco Coretta, and Daddy King says well, if a little child can love her, then we love her too. I was the flower girl in their wedding.

Stephen Strang: That's a great story. Also, there's a story about how your grandfather actually chose the name Martin Luther. I don't think that story is widely known. But it's an interesting story because he actually changed his name. Could you kind of outline how that happened?

Dr. Alveda King: Steve, you're a historian, so you understand oral history. So, there are various versions of it in many family stories. But the one that granddaddy told me, and he writes about it in the book as well, Daddy King, and you can find his explanation there as well. But when he was born, he was born to parents … as a matter of fact Daddy King’s grandfather, Nathan Brandon King, was an Irishman, an immigrant from Ireland and his mother … that was his grandparents until his parents birth, a man named James came and when James was born, he was visibly … you can see the Irish ancestry. So, here you have this young man from Stockbridge, Georgia, who walked with the shoes on his back to Atlanta, Georgia, to marry a middle-class woman, Alberta. She was the descendant directly of slaves and he was descended from Europe, as well as slaves. So, you had that that mixture. So, here we have Daddy King, but when he was born, it is said that his mother wanted to name him Martin Luther. She was a historian, an educator, a lot of teachers in our family on both sides. She had in mind Martin Luther. So she was going to name my son Martin Luther, but supposedly the midwife said that's too much of a fine name for a little negro or a little colored baby. So, she wrote Michael Luther King on the birth record. That's the way granddaddy told it to me. So, he was Michael Luther, and as a young man, really all of his life, some of peers called him Big Mike. But he also said it was Martin Luther, granddaddy and his wife and his young family traveled to Europe and studied a lot of history. He changed his name and his son's name. He went to the courthouse and that was something that Negro or African Americans didn't do a lot of during those days. He changed his name and his son's name to Martin Luther King. So, Daddy King became Martin Luther King and his son became Martin Luther King, Jr.

Stephen Strang: That's an interesting story. Of course, Martin Luther was a great person in history. And I'd heard the story about when he went to Europe. Actually, I think that story is told in Eric Metaxes’ wonderful biography of Martin Luther. I think that he told that story, maybe in the forward or something like that, but it's just interesting how all these things happen. Let's move along. You would have been probably in high school during the Civil Rights Movement, or maybe junior high, and then of course, everyone knows that in April of 1968, your uncle was tragically assassinated, and, in many ways, changed history. I think the history of race relations in the United States would be better had he lived. Not that it makes any difference, but I believe that he would have been the first African-American president had he lived. But actually, he was assassinated … wasn't he still in his late 30s when he died?

Dr. Alveda King: He and his brother were the same age, 39. Now, interestingly enough, I was in junior high school at the very beginning of the 1960s. Then I graduated into high school, and then of course, into college. So, when Martin Luther King Jr. died or was killed. I was a senior, and the very next year, I got married, my daddy walked me down the aisle and then he was killed a week later. So, I grew up in the Civil Rights Movement. I marched; I went to jail all those things called fair housing. My first march was in 1963, the famous Children's March in Birmingham, Alabama, after the young girls have been killed in the church Birmingham. My daddy took me and my brothers to the Children’s March and we marched in protest of that. And then the Fair Housing movement. I was very active in Louisville, Kentucky. We lived in Birmingham for three years and Louisville, Kentucky for three years when my father was pastoring churches there. So, when my uncle died, people ask me all the time, when Martin Luther King was shot, where were you? I was at a seamstresses’ home. I've always liked to have designer clothes, clothes designed for me as well as off the rack. I was having a periwinkle gown designed for me. I can see the dress. I went to try on the garment and the TV was on, black and white TV, the box that we used to have. Martin Luther King Jr. has been shot. I remember dropping everything and rushing home. My daddy came home from Memphis, he was in Memphis when his brother was killed. He came home to get the body of his brother, but he stopped in Birmingham for us. It is a short drive between Birmingham and Atlanta. And he explained to me and to the family that his brother had been killed and he was so bereaved. And I said, Daddy, I hate white people. I hate white people. They killed my uncle. And my daddy, I can remember as I tell you, Steve, as he put his arms around me and he began to rock me, and said, Alveda, we can’t hate white people. We’re one blood. They taught Acts 17:26, of one blood God created all people. He says we can't hate white people. White people March with us. We can't white hate white people; white people go to jail with us. We can't hate white people; white people die with us. He said white people didn't kill my brother, your uncle, the devil did. We have to forgive? And he rocked me in his arms talking about love and forgiveness.

For the rest of Stephen’s interview with Dr. Alveda King, please click here.

Connect with Dr. Alveda King

·         On Facebook

·         On  Twitter

·         Priestsforlife.org

·         Alvedaking.com

 

Where to Find Stephen Strang on the Internet

·         The Strang Report on Charismamag.com

·         The Strang Report on cpnshows.com

·         On Twitter

 

·         On Facebook

 

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How God Led MLK’s Niece to Choose Forgiveness with Dr. Alveda King